122P/de Vico
Discovery
Discovered byFrancesco de Vico
Discovery date20 February 1846
Alternative
designations
1846 IV, P/1846 D1, P/1995 S1
Orbital characteristics A
Aphelion34.70 AU
Perihelion0.659337 AU
Semi-major axis17.6808 AU
Eccentricity0.962709
Orbital period74.35 yr
Inclination85.3828°
Last perihelionOctober 6, 1995
Next perihelion14 October 2069[1][2][3]
21 October 2069[4]

122P/de Vico (provisional designation: 1846 D1) is a periodic comet with an orbital period of 74 years. It fits the classical definition of a Halley-type comet with (20 years < period < 200 years).[5] It was discovered by Francesco de Vico in Rome on February 20, 1846.

On 3 December 2153 the comet will pass about 0.694 AU (103,800,000 km; 64,500,000 mi) from Uranus.[5]

Daniel Kirkwood in 1884 noticed that the comet shares elements with comet 12P/Pons-Brooks. He suggested that 122P had calved off Pons-Brooks some centuries prior. Later he identified the two comets' capture into their elliptical orbits (or their parent body's capture) with their shared aphelion close to Neptune 991 CE.[6]

References

  1. ^ Syuichi Nakano (19 November 1999). "122P/de Vico (NK 724)". OAA Computing and Minor Planet Sections. Retrieved 2 February 2012.
  2. ^ "Horizons Batch for 44P/Reinmuth 2 (90001004) on 2029-May-20" (Perihelion occurs when rdot flips from negative to positive). JPL Horizons. Retrieved 21 June 2022. (JPL#27 Soln.date: 2001-Jul-02)
  3. ^ "122P/de Vico Orbit". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  4. ^ Seiichi Yoshida (9 November 2005). "122P/de Vico". Seiichi Yoshida's Comet Catalog. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  5. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 122P/de Vico" (25 June 1996 (last obs) // Soln.date: 2001-Jul-02). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  6. ^ Daniel Kirkwood (1886). "The Comets 1812 I, and 1846 IV". The Sidereal Messenger. 5: 13–14. Bibcode:1886SidM....5...13K.