1910 Harvard Crimson football
National champion
ConferenceIndependent
1910 record8–0–1
Head coach
Home stadiumHarvard Stadium
(capacity: 42,000)
Seasons
← 1909
1911 →
1910 Eastern college football independents records
Conf Overall
Team W   L   T W   L   T
Pittsburgh     9 0 0
Harvard     9 0 1
Penn     9 1 1
Princeton     7 1 0
Trinity (CT)     7 1 0
Ursinus     6 1 0
Rhode Island State     5 1 1
Lafayette     7 2 0
Army     6 2 0
Brown     7 2 1
Yale     6 2 2
Dartmouth     5 2 0
Cornell     5 2 1
Penn State     5 2 1
Colgate     4 2 1
Swarthmore     5 3 0
Franklin & Marshall     4 3 2
Syracuse     5 4 1
Rutgers     3 2 3
Carlisle     8 6 0
Holy Cross     3 3 2
Temple     3 3 0
Washington & Jefferson     3 3 1
Wesleyan     4 4 1
Geneva     2 5 2
NYU     2 4 1
Dickinson     3 7 0
Lehigh     2 6 1
Bucknell     2 6 0
Vermont     1 5 1
Carnegie Tech     1 6 1
Boston College     0 4 2
Tufts     1 7 1
Villanova     0 4 2

The 1910 Harvard Crimson football team was an American football team that represented Harvard University as an independent during the 1910 college football season. In its third year under head coach Percy Haughton, the Crimson compiled an 8–0–1 record, shut out seven of eight opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 155 to 5.[1]

There was no contemporaneous system in 1910 for determining a national champion. However, Harvard was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, and Houlgate System, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation.[2]: 112–114 

Three Harvard players were consensus first-team selections on the 1910 All-American football team: halfback Percy Wendell, guard Bob Fisher, and tackle Robert McKay.[3] Other notable players included fullback/halfback Hamilton Corbett (chosen as All-American by Wilton S. Farnsworth of the New York Evening Journal),[4] ends Lawrence Dunlap Smith and Richard Plimpton Lewis, tackle Lothrop "Ted" Withington, and guard Wayland Minot (chosen as first-team All-American by The New York Times).[5]

Schedule

DateTimeOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 283:30 p.m.BatesW 22–04,000[6][7]
October 13:00 p.m.Bowdoin
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 32–0[8][9]
October 83:00 p.m.Williams
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 21–0> 10,000[10][11]
October 153:00 p.m.Amherst
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 17–0[12][13]
October 19All-Stars
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 6–03,000[14]
October 22Brown
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 12–0[15]
October 29at ArmyW 6–0[16]
November 5Cornell
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA
W 27–510,000[17]
November 12Dartmouth
  • Harvard Stadium
  • Boston, MA (rivalry)
W 18–0[18]
November 19at YaleT 0–033,000[19]

References

  1. ^ "1910 Harvard Crimson Schedule and Results". S/R College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  2. ^ 2020 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. July 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 1, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  3. ^ "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. p. 6. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  4. ^ Farnsworth, W.S. (1910-12-04). "Picking All-Stars Is No Easy Task: Backfield Men Show Greater Individuality Then Men on the Line and Are More Easily Chosen". The Billings Daily Gazette.
  5. ^ "5 HARVARD MEN ON ALL-AMERICAN TEAM; Superiority of Crimson Players Earns Places on Picked Football Eleven" (PDF). The New York Times. 1910-12-04.
  6. ^ "Harvard Scores 22 to Bates' 0". The Boston Globe. September 29, 1910. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Harvard Meets Bates". The Boston Globe. September 28, 1910. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Harvard Swamps Bowdoin, 32 to 0". The Boston Globe. October 2, 1910. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Much Changed Team Meets Bowdoin Today". The Boston Globe. October 1, 1910. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Playing Good Football, Harvard Wins, 21 to 0". The Boston Globe. October 9, 1910. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Harvard Has a Last Season's Score to Settle With Williams This Afternoon". The Boston Globe. October 8, 1910. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Harvard Gains 17-to-0 Victory: Amherst, With a Bit of Luck, Early Threatens, But Never Again". The Boston Globe. October 16, 1910. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Harvard in Shape for Amherst Lads". The Boston Globe. October 15, 1910. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Harvard by 6-0: All-Stars Give Varsity Good Hard Tussle -- Field Goals Win". The Boston Globe. October 20, 1910. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Melville E. Webb Jr. (October 23, 1910). "Harvard Gains 12-0 Triumph Over Brown: Luck of the Game Is With Crimson Team in Battle That Comes Close to Being a Draw". The Boston Globe. pp. 1, 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Melville E. Webb Jr. (October 30, 1910). "Cadets Played to a Standstill: Ball Never Theirs on Harvard Side Of Field, Yet Score Is 6-0". The Boston Globe. pp. 1, 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Harvard Wins by 27-5: Cornell First to Cross Crimson's Goal Line". The Boston Globe. November 6, 1910. pp. 1, 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ W.S. Barnes Jr. (November 13, 1910). "Harvard Gains 18-to-0 Victory Over Dartmouth". The Boston Globe. pp. 1, 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Melville E. Webb Jr. and W.D. Sullivan (November 20, 1910). "Harvard Held to 0-to-0 Tie: Yale Gives Big Red Team Surprise and Shock". The Boston Globe. pp. 1, 16, 17 – via Newspapers.com.