1938 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Gerald Nugent
Manager(s)Jimmie Wilson
Local radioWCAU
(Bill Dyer)
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The 1938 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in eighth place – last in an eight-team National League – with a record of 45–105, 43 games behind the first-place Chicago Cubs and 24.5 games behind the seventh-place Brooklyn Dodgers. It was the first of five straight seasons in which the Phillies finished in last place. The Phillies wore blue and yellow on their uniforms in honor of the Tercentenary of New Sweden.[1]

The Phillies moved from their old home park, Baker Bowl, to Shibe Park midway through the season. Phillies president Gerald Nugent was eager to cut expenses and he cited the move as an opportunity for the Phillies to cut expenses by sharing stadium upkeep with the Philadelphia Athletics.[2]

Offseason

Regular season

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Chicago Cubs 89 63 0.586 44–33 45–30
Pittsburgh Pirates 86 64 0.573 2 44–33 42–31
New York Giants 83 67 0.553 5 43–30 40–37
Cincinnati Reds 82 68 0.547 6 43–34 39–34
Boston Bees 77 75 0.507 12 45–30 32–45
St. Louis Cardinals 71 80 0.470 17½ 36–41 35–39
Brooklyn Dodgers 69 80 0.463 18½ 31–41 38–39
Philadelphia Phillies 45 105 0.300 43 26–48 19–57

Record vs. opponents

1938 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 10–12 12–10 11–9 8–14 14–8 9–13 13–9–1
Brooklyn 10–12 9–11–1 9–13 8–14 15–7 9–11 9–12–1
Chicago 12–10 11–9–1 11–11 12–10 18–4 12–10 13–9–1
Cincinnati 9–11 13–9 11–11 12–9 14–7 10–12 13–9–1
New York 14–8 14–8 10–12 9–12 16–5 9–13–1 11–9–1
Philadelphia 8–14 7–15 4–18 7–14 5–16 8–12–1 6–16
Pittsburgh 13–9 11–9 10–12 12–10 13–9–1 12–8–1 15–7
St. Louis 9–13–1 12–9–1 9–13–1 9–13–1 9–11–1 16–6 7–15


Game log

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Phillies tie
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1938 Game Log[4]
Overall Record: 45–105–1
April (1–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
1 April 19 Dodgers 5–12 Luke Hamlin (1–0) Wayne LaMaster (0–1) None 10,000 0–1
2 April 20 Dodgers 6–5 Bucky Walters (1–0) Max Butcher (0–1) None 2,000 1–1
3 April 21 Dodgers 0–9 Tot Pressnell (1–0) Hugh Mulcahy (0–1) None 2,000 1–2
April 22 @ Bees Postponed (rain);[5] Makeup: July 1 as a traditional double-header
4 April 23 @ Bees 1–3 Lou Fette (1–0) Bill Hallahan (0–1) None 10,180 1–3
5 April 24 @ Bees 0–2 Danny MacFayden (1–1) Bucky Walters (1–1) None 11,216 1–4
April 25 @ Giants Postponed (rain[6] and inclement weather[7]); Makeup: April 27 as a traditional double-header
6 April 26 @ Giants 8–12 Dick Coffman (1–0) Wayne LaMaster (0–2) None 5,871 1–5
7 April 27 (1) @ Giants 3–7 Harry Gumbert (2–0) Hugh Mulcahy (0–2) None see 2nd game 1–6
8 April 27 (2) @ Giants 6–11 Cliff Melton (3–0) Syl Johnson (0–1) None 21,829 1–7
9 April 28 @ Dodgers 3–6 Luke Hamlin (2–1) Bucky Walters (1–2) Max Butcher (1) 6,745 1–8
10 April 29 @ Dodgers 4–5 (12) Tot Pressnell (2–1) Bill Hallahan (0–2) None 5,123 1–9
11 April 30 Bees 11–16 Johnny Niggeling (1–0) Tommy Reis (0–1) Ira Hutchinson (1) 2,500 1–10
May (10–11)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
12 May 1 Bees 5–1 Hugh Mulcahy (1–2) Jim Turner (2–1) None 5,000[8] 2–10
13 May 3 @ Cubs 2–5 Dizzy Dean (3–0) Bucky Walters (1–3) Charlie Root (2) 8,327[9] 2–11
14 May 4 @ Cubs 6–4 Claude Passeau (1–0) Larry French (1–2) Al Smith (1) 5,048[10] 3–11
15 May 5 @ Cubs 2–21 Al Epperly (1–0) Wayne LaMaster (0–3) None 1,314[11] 3–12
16 May 6 @ Cardinals 3–4 Curt Davis (1–1) Hugh Mulcahy (1–3) None 1,858 3–13
May 7 @ Cardinals Postponed (rain);[12] Makeup: July 17 as a traditional double-header
17 May 8 @ Reds 2–0 Bucky Walters (2–3) Johnny Vander Meer (1–2) None 11,116 4–13
18 May 9 @ Reds 4–9 Peaches Davis (2–3) Claude Passeau (1–1) None 540 4–14
19 May 10 @ Reds 3–7 Joe Cascarella (2–0) Hugh Mulcahy (1–4) None 947 4–15
May 11 @ Pirates Postponed (cold[13] and rain[14]); Makeup: June 12 as a traditional double-header
May 12 @ Pirates Postponed (cold[15] and rain[16]); Makeup: July 20 as a traditional double-header
May 14 Giants Postponed (rain);[17] Makeup: June 29 as a traditional double-header
May 15 Giants Postponed (rain);[18] Makeup: August 13 as a traditional double-header
20 May 16 Giants 12–3 Bucky Walters (3–3) Hal Schumacher (2–2) None 1,500 5–15
21 May 17 Reds 1–13 Paul Derringer (5–2) Claude Passeau (1–2) None 1,500[19] 5–16
May 18 Reds Postponed (rain);[20] Makeup: June 26 as a traditional double-header
22 May 19 Reds 5–4 Hugh Mulcahy (2–4) Joe Cascarella (2–1) None 1,000[21] 6–16
23 May 20 Cubs 7–16 Tex Carleton (4–2) Bucky Walters (3–4) Jack Russell (2) 2,964[22] 6–17
24 May 21 Cubs 1–10 Larry French (2–4) Claude Passeau (1–3) None 5,000[23] 6–18
25 May 22 Cardinals 2–1 Pete Sivess (1–0) Bill McGee (2–1) None 5,000[24] 7–18
26 May 23 Cardinals 7–6 Hugh Mulcahy (3–4) Mike Ryba (0–1) None 1,000 8–18
May 24 Pirates Postponed (rain[25] and wet grounds[26]); Makeup: June 19 as a traditional double-header[25]
27 May 25 Pirates 2–1 Bucky Walters (4–4) Jim Tobin (3–3) None 1,000 9–18
May 26 Pirates Postponed (rain);[27] Makeup: September 18 as a traditional double-header
May 27 @ Giants Postponed (rain[28] and wet grounds[29]); Makeup: May 28 as a traditional double-header
28 May 28 (1) @ Giants 4–5 Cliff Melton (7–1) Hugh Mulcahy (3–5) Dick Coffman (5) see 2nd game 9–19
29 May 28 (2) @ Giants 0–11 Carl Hubbell (6–1) Pete Sivess (1–1) None 26,476 9–20
30 May 29 @ Giants 6–7 Harry Gumbert (4–3) Bucky Walters (4–5) Jumbo Brown (1) 14,889 9–21
31 May 30 (1) @ Dodgers 9–5 Claude Passeau (2–3) Vito Tamulis (0–4) None see 2nd game 10–21
32 May 30 (2) @ Dodgers 7–4 Wayne LaMaster (1–3) Van Mungo (2–5) Pete Sivess (1) 18,500 11–21
June (5–20)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
33 June 1 @ Cardinals 4–9 Ray Harrell (2–1) Hugh Mulcahy (3–6) None 1,471 11–22
34 June 2 @ Cardinals 5–12 Roy Henshaw (1–0) Bucky Walters (4–6) None 1,635 11–23
35 June 3 @ Cardinals 7–8 (11) Max Macon (1–4) Al Smith (0–1) None 1,456 11–24
36 June 4 @ Cubs 1–5 Larry French (4–5) Claude Passeau (2–4) None 8,505 11–25
37 June 5 @ Cubs 1–7 Tex Carleton (6–3) Hugh Mulcahy (3–7) None 17,311 11–26
38 June 6 @ Cubs 8–10 Charlie Root (3–1) Bucky Walters (4–7) Bob Logan (2) 2,906 11–27
June 7 @ Reds Postponed (rain);[30] Makeup: July 22 as a traditional double-header
39 June 8 @ Reds 5–7 Paul Derringer (8–4) Claude Passeau (2–5) None 14,898 11–28
40 June 10 @ Pirates 3–2 Hugh Mulcahy (4–7) Russ Bauers (1–4) None 1,034 12–28
41 June 11 @ Pirates 3–4 Bill Swift (3–2) Bucky Walters (4–8) None 3,811 12–29
42 June 12 (1) @ Pirates 5–11 Mace Brown (8–2) Claude Passeau (2–6) None 4,826 12–30
June 12 (2) @ Pirates Postponed (rain[31] and Sunday curfew[a]); Makeup: August 25 as a traditional double-header
43 June 14 Cardinals 3–4 Curt Davis (6–2) Hugh Mulcahy (4–8) None 1,000[32] 12–31
44 June 15 Cardinals 7–9 Mike Ryba (1–1) Syl Johnson (0–2) Clyde Shoun (1) 1,500 12–32
45 June 16 Cardinals 3–2 Claude Passeau (3–6) Bill McGee (2–5) None 975 13–32
46 June 17 Pirates 3–4 (10) Mace Brown (9–2) Al Hollingsworth (2–3) None 4,000 13–33
47 June 18 Pirates 5–3 Hugh Mulcahy (5–8) Russ Bauers (1–6) Claude Passeau (1) 3,000[33] 14–33
48 June 19 (1) Pirates 4–14 Jim Tobin (5–3) Pete Sivess (1–2) None see 2nd game 14–34
49 June 19 (2) Pirates 3–16 Cy Blanton (2–1) Wayne LaMaster (1–4) None 10,000 14–35
50 June 21 Cubs 3–4 Al Epperly (2–0) Claude Passeau (3–7) Charlie Root (4) 1,200 14–36
June 22 Cubs Postponed (rain);[34] Makeup: July 31 as a traditional double-header
June 23 Cubs Postponed (rain);[35] Makeup: September 20 as a traditional double-header
51 June 24 Reds 4–6 Peaches Davis (4–3) Al Hollingsworth (2–4) Joe Cascarella (3) 5,000 14–37
52 June 25 Reds 7–6 (12) Al Hollingsworth (3–4) Joe Cascarella (3–4) None 2,500 15–37
53 June 26 (1) Reds 10–3 Claude Passeau (4–7) Jim Weaver (4–3) None see 2nd game 16–37
54 June 26 (2) Reds 5–8 Paul Derringer (10–5) Wayne LaMaster (1–5) None 8,520 16–38
June 28 Giants Postponed (rain);[36] Makeup: August 14 as a traditional double-header
55 June 29 (1) Giants 1–9 Hal Schumacher (7–5) Al Hollingsworth (3–5) None see 2nd game 16–39
56 June 29 (2) Giants 2–6 Cliff Melton (8–5) Hugh Mulcahy (5–9) None 8,000 16–40
57 June 30 Giants 1–14[b] Slick Castleman (3–2) Claude Passeau (4–8) None 1,500 16–41
July (13–19)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
58 July 1 (1) @ Bees 4–1 Claude Passeau (5–8) Bobby Reis (0–1) None see 2nd game 17–41
59 July 1 (2) @ Bees 5–0 Wayne LaMaster (2–5) Dick Errickson (0–4) None 2,313 18–41
60 July 2 @ Bees 1–2 Ira Hutchinson (4–4) Syl Johnson (0–3) None 7,252 18–42
61 July 3 (1)[c] @ Dodgers 1–3 Vito Tamulis (2–6) Al Hollingsworth (3–6) None see 2nd game 18–43
62 July 3 (2)[c] @ Dodgers 0–2 Bill Posedel (4–4) Bill Hallahan (0–3) None 10,157 18–44
63 July 4 (1) Bees 5–10 Bobby Reis (1–1) Hugh Mulcahy (5–10) None see 2nd game 18–45
64 July 4 (2) Bees 10–2 Claude Passeau (6–8) Dick Errickson (0–5) None 12,000 19–45
July 6 1938 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Crosley Field in Cincinnati
65 July 8 Dodgers 2–13 Vito Tamulis (3–6) Hugh Mulcahy (5–11) None 2,500 19–46
66 July 9 Dodgers 4–3 (16) Claude Passeau (7–8) Luke Hamlin (4–6) None 1,277 20–46
67 July 10 (1)[d] Dodgers 3–6 Tot Pressnell (7–7) Al Hollingsworth (3–7) Vito Tamulis (2) see 2nd game 20–47
68 July 10 (2)[d] Dodgers 5–3 Wayne LaMaster (3–5) Max Butcher (4–4) Pete Sivess (2) 4,949 21–47
July 13 @ Cubs Postponed (wet grounds[37] and rain[38]); Makeup: July 14 as a traditional double-header
69 July 14 (1) @ Cubs 0–3 Clay Bryant (7–7) Claude Passeau (7–9) None 10,000[39][40] 21–48
70 July 14 (2) @ Cubs 1–5 Bill Lee (10–5) Hugh Mulcahy (5–12) None 9,581[40] 21–49
71 July 15 @ Cubs 1–4 Larry French (6–12) Wayne LaMaster (3–6) None 5,581[41][42] 21–50
72 July 16 @ Cardinals 2–1 Al Hollingsworth (4–7) Lon Warneke (6–4) None 1,781 22–50
July 17 (1) @ Cardinals Postponed (rain);[43] Makeup: August 30 as a traditional double-header
July 17 (2) @ Cardinals Postponed (rain);[43] Makeup: August 31 as a traditional double-header
73 July 18 @ Cardinals 3–5 Curt Davis (8–2) Claude Passeau (7–10) Max Macon (2) 95 22–51
74 July 19 @ Pirates 0–8 Ed Brandt (2–2) Hugh Mulcahy (5–13) None 2,472 22–52
75 July 20 (1) @ Pirates 11–0 Al Hollingsworth (5–7) Bob Klinger (8–2) None see 2nd game 23–52
76 July 20 (2) @ Pirates 1–4 Russ Bauers (5–7) Pete Sivess (1–3) None 6,000 23–53
77 July 21 @ Pirates 4–5 Mace Brown (13–3) Al Smith (0–2) None 10,535 23–54
78 July 22 (1) @ Reds 2–5 Paul Derringer (12–7) Claude Passeau (7–11) None see 2nd game 23–55
79 July 22 (2) @ Reds 11–10 Wayne LaMaster (4–6) Peaches Davis (5–6) Hugh Mulcahy (1) 5,419 24–55
80 July 23 @ Reds 9–10 Gene Schott (3–2) Bill Hallahan (0–4) None 3,619 24–56
81 July 24 (1)[e] @ Reds 5–7 Whitey Moore (2–0) Al Hollingsworth (5–8) Paul Derringer (1) see 2nd game 24–57
82 July 24 (2)[e] @ Reds 5–1 Syl Johnson (1–3) Johnny Vander Meer (11–6) None 26,630 25–57
83 July 26 Pirates 6–5 Pete Sivess (2–3) Mace Brown (13–4) None 1,500 26–57
84 July 27 Pirates 2–4 Russ Bauers (6–8) Bill Hallahan (0–5) None 1,000[44] 26–58
85 July 28 Pirates 2–9 Jim Tobin (9–4) Al Hollingsworth (5–9) None 2,000 26–59
86 July 29 Cubs 5–4 (12) Pete Sivess (3–3) Larry French (7–14) None 3,000 27–59
87 July 30 Cubs 5–4 Claude Passeau (8–11) Larry French (7–15) None 1,931[45] 28–59
88 July 31 (1) Cubs 6–5 (12) Syl Johnson (2–3) Bill Lee (13–6) None see 2nd game 29–59
89 July 31 (2) Cubs 3–4 (7)[f] Charlie Root (4–2) Hugh Mulcahy (5–14) None 15,000 29–60
August (9–21)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
90 August 2 Reds 2–3 Johnny Vander Meer (12–6) Wayne LaMaster (4–7) Paul Derringer (2) 2,000[46] 29–61
91 August 3 Reds 3–6 (10) Whitey Moore (3–0) Claude Passeau (8–12) None 1,845 29–62
August 4 Reds Postponed (rain);[47] Makeup: September 16 as a traditional double-header
92 August 5 Cardinals 0–3 Lon Warneke (9–5) Hugh Mulcahy (5–15) None 1,246 29–63
93 August 6 Cardinals 6–7 Bob Weiland (11–8) Al Hollingsworth (5–10) Curt Davis (2) 1,000[48] 29–64
94 August 7 (1)[g] Cardinals 6–3 Claude Passeau (9–12) Clyde Shoun (2–5) None see 2nd game 30–64
95 August 7 (2)[g] Cardinals 1–5 (7) Bill McGee (4–9) Bill Hallahan (0–6) None 3,500 30–65
96 August 9 @ Dodgers 6–9 Tot Pressnell (10–11) Syl Johnson (2–4) Luke Hamlin (5) 3,268[49] 30–66
97 August 12 Giants 0–1 Harry Gumbert (10–9) Al Hollingsworth (5–11) None 5,000 30–67
98 August 13 (1) Giants 1–11 Carl Hubbell (13–9) Claude Passeau (9–13) None see 2nd game 30–68
99 August 13 (2) Giants 4–2 Max Butcher (6–4) Cliff Melton (9–11) None 10,000 31–68
100 August 14 (1) Giants 0–11 Hal Schumacher (10–7) Hugh Mulcahy (5–16) Jumbo Brown (2) see 2nd game 31–69
101 August 14 (2) Giants 6–14 Bill Lohrman (7–1) Pete Sivess (3–4) Dick Coffman (12) 12,000 31–70
102 August 15 Bees 3–5 Dick Errickson (4–5) Syl Johnson (2–5) None 700 31–71
103 August 16 Bees 7–6 (11) Hugh Mulcahy (6–16) Milt Shoffner (5–5) None 1,000 32–71
104 August 17 Bees 0–3 (8) Ira Hutchinson (5–7) Max Butcher (6–5) None 1,000 32–72
August 18 Bees Postponed (wet grounds[50] and rain[51]); Makeup: September 11 as a traditional double-header
105 August 19 @ Giants 2–4 Bill Lohrman (8–1) Bill Hallahan (0–7) None 10,967 32–73
106 August 20 @ Giants 8–7 Al Hollingsworth (6–11) Jumbo Brown (3–3) None 6,771 33–73
107 August 21 @ Giants 8–3 Max Butcher (7–5) Cliff Melton (10–12) None 8,970 34–73
108 August 23 @ Reds 0–3 Whitey Moore (5–1) Al Hollingsworth (6–12) None 3,010 34–74
109 August 24 @ Reds 1–3 Lee Grissom (2–3) Hugh Mulcahy (6–17) Jim Weaver (1) 4,156 34–75
110 August 25 (1) @ Pirates 2–1 Max Butcher (8–5) Cy Blanton (10–4) None see 2nd game 35–75
111 August 25 (2) @ Pirates 2–1 (11) Bill Hallahan (1–7) Red Lucas (4–3) None 3,093 36–75
112 August 26 @ Pirates 6–4 Al Smith (1–2) Jim Tobin (11–7) Pete Sivess (3) 3,294[52] 37–75
113 August 27 @ Pirates 1–6 Ed Brandt (5–2) Al Hollingsworth (6–13) None 5,889 37–76
114 August 28 (1)[h] @ Cubs 5–6 (11) Clay Bryant (13–10) Pete Sivess (3–5) None see 2nd game 37–77
115 August 28 (2)[h] @ Cubs 1–3 Vance Page (3–2) Syl Johnson (2–6) None 26,348 37–78
116 August 30 (1) @ Cardinals 4–3 Max Butcher (9–5) Max Macon (2–9) None see 2nd game 38–78
117 August 30 (2) @ Cardinals 7–8 (10) Clyde Shoun (4–5) Al Smith (1–3) None 2,679[53] 38–79
118 August 31 (1) @ Cardinals 1–2 (10) Clyde Shoun (5–5) Claude Passeau (9–14) None see 2nd game 38–80
119 August 31 (2) @ Cardinals 6–7 Lon Warneke (13–5) Al Hollingsworth (6–14) None 2,449[54] 38–81
September (7–22–1)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
120 September 1 @ Cardinals 5–6 Curt Davis (11–7) Al Smith (1–4) None 1,134[55] 38–82
121 September 3 @ Bees 0–1 Danny MacFayden (12–6) Max Butcher (9–6) None 5,276 38–83
122 September 4 (1) @ Bees 4–2 Hugh Mulcahy (7–17) Jim Turner (12–15) None see 2nd game 39–83
123 September 4 (2) @ Bees 2–6 Dick Errickson (7–6) Syl Johnson (2–7) None 14,867[56] 39–84
124 September 5 (1) Giants 0–7 Cliff Melton (11–13) Claude Passeau (9–15) None see 2nd game 39–85
125 September 5 (2) Giants 4–3 Al Hollingsworth (7–14) Bill Lohrman (8–4) None 10,000 40–85
126 September 6 Dodgers 4–6 Vito Tamulis (9–9) Bill Hallahan (1–8) None 500 40–86
127 September 7 Dodgers 6–3 Hugh Mulcahy (8–17) Tot Pressnell (11–14) None 500 41–86
128 September 8 @ Dodgers[i] 0–5 Luke Hamlin (10–12) Max Butcher (9–7) None 11,908 41–87
129 September 9 Bees 4–2 Claude Passeau (10–15) Lou Fette (11–10) None 1,000[57] 42–87
130 September 10 Bees 5–6 Johnny Lanning (8–7) Al Hollingsworth (7–15) None 1,000[58] 42–88
131 September 11 (1) Bees 11–2 Hugh Mulcahy (9–17) Danny MacFayden (12–8) None see 2nd game 43–88
132 September 11 (2) Bees 2–3 Ira Hutchinson (7–8) Max Butcher (9–8) Dick Errickson (6) 2,500 43–89
September 13 Cardinals Postponed (rain[59] and wet grounds[60]); Makeup: September 14 as a traditional double-header[60]
133 September 14 (1) Cardinals 9–12 Max Macon (4–11) Claude Passeau (10–16) None see 2nd game 43–90
134 September 14 (2) Cardinals 2–3 Mort Cooper (1–0) Al Hollingsworth (7–16) None 1,000 43–91
135 September 16 (1) Reds 0–2 Paul Derringer (20–12) Max Butcher (9–9) None see 2nd game 43–92
136 September 16 (2) Reds 2–1 Hugh Mulcahy (10–17) Whitey Moore (6–3) None 3,000 44–92
September 17 Reds Canceled (rain);[61] No makeup scheduled
137 September 18 (1) Pirates 0–1 Russ Bauers (11–13) Al Hollingsworth (7–17) None see 2nd game 44–93
138 September 18 (2) Pirates 1–1 (5)[j] None None None 1,500 44–93–1
September 19 (1) Pirates Canceled (rain);[62] No makeup scheduled
September 19 (2) Pirates Canceled (rain);[62] No makeup scheduled
September 20 (1) Cubs Postponed (rain);[63] Makeup: September 21 as a traditional double-header
September 20 (2) Cubs Postponed (rain);[63] Makeup: September 22 as a traditional double-header
September 21 (1) Cubs Postponed (rain);[64] Makeup: September 23 as a traditional double-header
September 21 (2) Cubs Postponed (rain);[64] Makeup: September 23 as a traditional double-header
139 September 22 (1) Cubs 0–4 Bill Lee (20–9) Max Butcher (9–10) None see 2nd game 44–94–1
140 September 22 (2) Cubs 1–2 Clay Bryant (18–11) Claude Passeau (10–17) None 2,000[65] 44–95–1
141 September 23 (1) Cubs 2–3 Jack Russell (6–1) Hugh Mulcahy (10–18) None see 2nd game 44–96–1
142 September 23 (2) Cubs 6–7 Larry French (10–18) Al Hollingsworth (7–18) None 1,000[66] 44–97–1
143 September 24 @ Dodgers 1–8 Vito Tamulis (11–9) Tom Lanning (0–1) None 2,772 44–98–1
144 September 25 (1)[k] @ Dodgers 1–5 Luke Hamlin (12–14) Max Butcher (9–11) Tot Pressnell (3) see 2nd game 44–99–1
145 September 25 (2)[k] @ Dodgers 5–1 (7) Claude Passeau (11–17) Lee Rogers (1–3) None 8,124 45–99–1
146 September 27 (1)[l] @ Bees 1–2 (11) Jim Turner (14–17) Hugh Mulcahy (10–19) None see 2nd game 45–100–1
147 September 27 (2)[l] @ Bees 1–4 Tom Earley (1–0) Elmer Burkart (0–1) None 11,617 45–101–1
148 September 28 @ Bees 1–3 Ira Hutchinson (9–8) Pete Sivess (3–6) None 952 45–102–1
149 September 29 @ Giants 2–9 Cliff Melton (14–14) Max Butcher (9–12) None 1,190[67] 45–103–1
September 30 @ Giants Canceled (rain);[68] No makeup scheduled
October (0–2)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
150 October 2 (1)[m] Dodgers 3–7 Sam Nahem (1–0) Claude Passeau (11–18) None see 2nd game 45–104–1
151 October 2 (2)[m] Dodgers 2–7 John Gaddy (2–0) Hugh Mulcahy (10–20) None 500 45–105–1
^[a] The second game on June 12, 1938, was called due to the Pennsylvania Sunday curfew in the middle of the second inning[69] with the score 0–0.[70] Since the game was not yet official, it was replayed from the beginning on August 25.
^[b] The June 30, 1938, game was protested by the Phillies in the bottom of the first inning.[71] The protest is not mentioned in contemporary newspaper accounts.
^[c] The original schedule indicated single games on July 3 and August 10 in Brooklyn[72] which became a double-header on July 3. Contemporary newspaper accounts indicated the August 10 game was postponed due to rain.[73]
^[d] The original schedule indicated single games on July 10 (in Philadelphia) and August 11 (in Brooklyn) with Brooklyn[72] which became a double-header on July 10 (in Philadelphia).[74]
^[e] The original schedule indicated single games on June 9 and July 24 at Cincinnati[72] which became a double-header on July 24.
^[f] The second game on July 31, 1938, ended after seven innings due to the Pennsylvania Sunday curfew law[75][76] with the score 3–4.[77]
^[g] The original schedule indicated single games on August 7 and September 15 with St. Louis[72] which became a double-header on August 7.
^[h] The original schedule indicated single games on August 28 and 29 at Chicago[72] which became a double-header on August 28.[78]
^[i] The original schedule indicated a home game on September 8 with Brooklyn[72] which became an away game at Brooklyn. This became necessary because the August 11 away game at Brooklyn became the July 10 home game in Philadelphia.(See note d above.)
^[j] The September 18, 1938, game ended after five innings due to darkness with the score tied 1–1,[79] and an additional game was scheduled for September 19.[80]
^[k] The original schedule indicated single games on September 23 and 25 at Brooklyn[72] which became a double-header on September 25. September 23 was used to reschedule home games with Chicago that were postponed due to rain on September 20 and 21.
^[l] The original schedule indicated single games on September 26 and 27 at Boston[72] which became a double-header on September 27.
^[m] The original schedule indicated single games on October 1 and 2 with Brooklyn[72] which became a double-header on October 2.

Roster

1938 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
2B Heinie Mueller 136 444 111 .250 4 34
SS Del Young 108 340 78 .229 0 31

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Cap Clark 52 74 19 .257 0 4
Jimmie Wilson 3 2 0 .000 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Max Butcher 12 98.1 4 8 2.93 29

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Pete Sivess 39 116 3 6 5.51 32
Elmer Burkart 2 10 0 1 4.50 1

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO

Farm system

See also: Minor League Baseball

Level Team League Manager
B Montgomery Bombers Southeastern League Bud Connolly
D Centreville Colts Eastern Shore League Patsy O'Rourke
D Jonesboro Giants Northeast Arkansas League Pete Cooper, Gus Albright and Fred Millican

[81]

Notes

  1. ^ Levin, Morris; Hecken, Phil (August 2, 2013). "Where the Phillies Wore Blue and Yellow for Swedish Heritage". uni-watch.com. Paul Lukas. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  2. ^ "Phils Set to Close Deal for Use of Shibe Park". New York Times. June 26, 1938.
  3. ^ Earl Grace page at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ "1938 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  5. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. April 23, 1938. p. 16. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  6. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. April 26, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  7. ^ "Majors At A Glance". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. April 26, 1938. p. 25. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  8. ^ "Phils 5, Bees 1". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). May 2, 1938. p. 5. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  9. ^ "Dizzy Dean Gains Third Win As Cubs Down Phils 5 To 2: "Great One" Yanked Out In 7th For Pinch-Hitter After Allowing Eight Hits and Two Runs—Cards Nip Bees". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). May 4, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  10. ^ "Phils 6, Cubs 4". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). May 5, 1938. p. 10. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  11. ^ "Bruins Smother Phillies Under 21 To 2 Score: Paul Epperly Limits Phils To Six Hits As Mates Collect 18". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). May 6, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  12. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 8, 1938. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  13. ^ Biederman, Lester (May 11, 1938). "Cold Keeps Pirates Idle Again: Phils Play Single Game Tomorrow: Brubaker On First; Dickshot In Right; Al Todd Swings Fifth". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 24. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  14. ^ "Van Mungo Puts Cubs In Place: Brooklyn Hurler Shuts Them Out—Giants Defeat Cards". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. May 12, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  15. ^ Biederman, Lester (May 12, 1938). "Cold Ruins Phil Finale; Bucs Go West Tonight". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 26. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  16. ^ "The Scoreboard". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. May 13, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  17. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 15, 1938. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  18. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. May 16, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  19. ^ "Redlegs Crush Phillies, 13-1; Frey Connects: McCormick Smacks Four Out of Six". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). May 18, 1938. p. 9. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  20. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. May 19, 1938. p. 16. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  21. ^ "Chicago Chops At Giant Lead: Cubs Take 10-Inning Struggle—Bees Humble Pittsburgh Again". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). May 20, 1938. p. 23. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  22. ^ "Cubs Wallop Phillies In 16-7 Frolic: Hack Leads Attack, Whitney Homers". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). May 21, 1938. p. 11. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  23. ^ "Chicago Trims Phillies, 10-1, Behind French: Larry Yields Only Five Hits". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). May 22, 1938. p. 19. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  24. ^ "Phillies Upset Cardinals, 2-1 In Ninth Frame: Klein Bangs Triple With Brown On". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). May 23, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  25. ^ a b Biederman, Lester (May 24, 1938). "Lloyd Now 'Big Poison' of Waners: First Pirate-Phil Battle Rained Out: Lloyd Termed 'Pro' Because He's Only Bucco to Look Like Professional—Mace Brown Injured as Pirates Finally Beat Giants". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. pp. 23, 25. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  26. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. May 25, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  27. ^ "Pirates Rained Out; Play Here Tomorrow". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). May 26, 1938. pp. 26, 28. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  28. ^ "Baseball At A Glance". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 27, 1938. p. 33. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  29. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 28, 1938. p. 6. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  30. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 8, 1938. p. 25. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  31. ^ Biederman, Lester (June 13, 1938). "Another Pirate Trading Effort Fails: Phils Ignore Bid Of Dickshot Or Jensen For Klein: Bucs Leave for East Tonight Still Hopeful of Trade Before Major Deadline Wednesday". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 20. Retrieved April 17, 2020. Two games were carded yesterday, but persistent and at times, heavy rain caused a two-hour delay starting the first contest and when it was over there was time enough for only an inning and a half of the second game. But the 7900 fans were satisfied to have waited through the long afternoon.
  32. ^ "Cards 4, Phils 3". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). June 15, 1938. pp. 4–5. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  33. ^ "New York Giants Push Their National League Margin to Four Games: Bartell Clouts Pair of Homers: Trounce Cardinals While Dodgers Turn Back Chicago Outfit". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). June 19, 1938. pp. 1-2 (Part Two). Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  34. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. June 23, 1938. p. 15. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  35. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. June 24, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  36. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 28, 1938. p. 21. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  37. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. July 13, 1938. p. 20. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  38. ^ "Baseball Scores". The Ottawa Evening Citizen. Ottawa, ON. July 14, 1938. p. 11. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  39. ^ "Cubs 3-5, Phils 0-1". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). July 15, 1938. p. 15. Retrieved April 22, 2020. 10,000 (estimated)
  40. ^ a b "Pirates Forge Back Into Lead: Win Heartbreaker From Brooklyn as Cincinnati Beats New York". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). July 15, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  41. ^ "Cubs 4, Phils 1". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). July 16, 1938. p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2020. Ladies' day crowd of 21,968 ... 5,581 (official) 16,387 Ladies Day
  42. ^ "French Hurls Cubs to Win". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. Associated Press (AP). July 16, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 22, 2020. before a ladies' day crowd of 21,968
  43. ^ a b "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. July 18, 1938. p. 19. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  44. ^ "Young's Hitting Gives Bucs 4-2 Win Over Phils: Second Sacker Bats In All Pittsburgh's Tallies: Cards 7, Giants 0: Bees Score 1 To 0 And 5 To 1 Triumphs Over Reds". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). July 28, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  45. ^ "Giants Beat Reds, 3-2; Phils Chase 'Dizzy' And Check Cubs, 5-4: 'Jo-Jo' Moore's Homer Clinches—French Makes Futile Effort After Bruins Tie Score". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). July 31, 1938. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  46. ^ "Boston and Chicago Set Back National League Front Runners Easily: Pirates Beaten By Bees, 3 To 1: Get but 4 Hits—Cub Hurler Handcuffs New York Batters". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). August 3, 1938. p. 8. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  47. ^ "Baseball at Glance". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. August 4, 1938. p. 19. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  48. ^ "Reds Stretch Their Winning Streak to Five---Equal Major League Mark: Pass Chicago To Take Third: Boston Blanks Cubs While St. Louis Noses Out Philadelphia". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). August 7, 1938. p. 2 (Part 2). Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  49. ^ "Dodger 9, Phils 6". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). August 10, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  50. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. August 18, 1938. p. 22. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  51. ^ "The Scoreboard". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. August 19, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  52. ^ "Phils Hand Bucs Third Straight Defeat 6 To 4: Lefty Al Smith Limits League Leaders To Seven Hits: Cards 7, Giants 6: Bees Beat Reds Again 6 To 1, Cubs Top Dodgers, 7-3". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). August 27, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved April 24, 2020. Attendance—3,294 paid; 4.251 children.
  53. ^ "Cards, Phils Split Games: Error in Tenth Gives Second Battle to St. Louis". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). August 31, 1938. p. 11. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  54. ^ "Cards 2-7, Phils 1-6". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). September 1, 1938. pp. 4, 10. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  55. ^ "Cards 6, Phils 5". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). September 2, 1938. pp. 12–13. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  56. ^ "Phillies Bump Bees". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). September 5, 1938. p. 9. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  57. ^ "Giants Humbled By Fitzsimmons: Ex-New York Hurler Pitches Brooklyn to Strong 7-1 Victory". The Spokesman Review. Spokane, WA. Associated Press (AP). September 10, 1938. p. 15. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  58. ^ "Bees Squeeze Out Win Over Phils". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). September 11, 1938. p. 3 (Sports). Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  59. ^ "The Scoreboard". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. September 14, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  60. ^ a b "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. September 14, 1938. p. 14. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  61. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. September 18, 1938. p. 1 (Sports). Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  62. ^ a b Biederman, Lester (September 19, 1938). "Rain Washes Out Pirates in Philly: Move To Brooklyn For New Series of Doubleheaders". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 19. Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  63. ^ a b "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. September 20, 1938. p. 22. Retrieved April 26, 2020. The rain may be the result of the 1938 New England hurricane.
  64. ^ a b "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. September 21, 1938. p. 16. Retrieved April 26, 2020. The rain may be the result of the 1938 New England hurricane.
  65. ^ "Giants Beat Reds Twice, 6-1, 2-1; Take Third Place: Schumacher Bests Vander Meer, Gumbert Outhurls Derringer: Bees Win Two: Boston Takes Measure Of Cardinals 6 To 4 And 4 To 1". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). September 23, 1938. pp. 12–13. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  66. ^ "Cubs Back In Thick of Fight: Chicagoans Stage Late-Inning Rallies to Triumph Twice in Philadelphia While Cincinnati Noses Out Pittsburgh". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. September 24, 1938. p. 1 (Section 3). Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  67. ^ "Only 1,190 At Polo Grounds". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. September 30, 1938. p. 3. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  68. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. October 1, 1938. p. 8. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  69. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates 11, Philadelphia Phillies 5". retrosheet.org. June 12, 1938. Retrieved April 17, 2020. Start of game was delayed for two hours due to rain[.] ... Game 2 of scheduled doubleheader was cancelled after one inning due to Sunday curfew[.]
  70. ^ "Pirates Crush Phillies, 11-5: Brown Gets Eighth Relief Victory". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). June 13, 1938. p. 8. Retrieved April 17, 2020. The game was delayed more than two hours by rain and a scheduled second contest was called in the second inning because of the Sunday curfew law. Neither team had scored.
  71. ^ "New York Giants 14, Philadelphia Phillies 1". retrosheet.org. June 30, 1938. Retrieved April 18, 2020. This is the last game played by the Phillies in Baker Bowl[.] ... [Chuck] Klein flied into a double play to center [[Heinie] Mueller out at second (center to shortstop)]; Phillies Manager Jimmie Wilson argued Hank Leiber did not hold the ball before dropping it so Heinie Mueller did not have to tag up; Wilson protested the game[.]
  72. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1938 Original Regular Season Schedules". retrosheet.org. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  73. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. August 11, 1938. p. 10. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  74. ^ "Yesterday's Baseball". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. August 12, 1938. p. 12. Retrieved April 11, 2020. to be played at later [sic] date.
  75. ^ "Majors at Glance". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. August 1, 1938. p. 21. Retrieved April 26, 2020. (Game called end of seventh; Sunday law).
  76. ^ "Chicago Cubs 4, Philadelphia Phillies 3 (2)". retrosheet.org. July 31, 1938. Retrieved April 26, 2020. Game called on account of Sunday curfew[.]
  77. ^ "Phils 6-3, Cubs 5-4". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). August 1, 1938. pp. 4, 11. Retrieved April 26, 2020. The second game went only seven innings due to Philadelphia's Sunday law.
  78. ^ "Baseball Scores". The Ottawa Evening Citizen. Ottawa, ON. August 30, 1938. p. 10. Retrieved April 22, 2020. [Game] played previously[.]
  79. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 1, Pittsburgh Pirates 1 (2)". retrosheet.org. September 18, 1938. Retrieved April 25, 2020. Game called for darkness[.]
  80. ^ "Pirates Win And Increase Lead Over Cubs To 3 And 1-2 Games: Pie Traynor's Charges Gain 1 To 0 Decision In Opening Game Of Twin Bill With Phils And Gain 1 To 1 Tie In Abbreviated Second Game—Cubs Subdued By Dodgers 4 To 1 In First Game And Second End in 3 To 3 Tie". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). September 19, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved April 25, 2020. A doubleheader was scheduled for tomorrow.
  81. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References