1944 Florida gubernatorial election

← 1940 November 7, 1944 1948 →
 
Nominee Millard Caldwell Bert L. Acker
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 361,007 96,321
Percentage 78.94% 21.06%

County Results
Caldwell:      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%

Governor before election

Spessard Holland
Democratic

Elected Governor

Millard Caldwell
Democratic

The 1944 Florida gubernatorial election was held on November 7, 1944. Democratic nominee Millard Caldwell defeated Republican nominee Bert L. Acker with 78.94% of the vote.

Primary elections

Primary elections were held on May 2, 1944, with the Democratic runoff held on May 23, 1944.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results[1][2][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Millard F. Caldwell 116,111 28.39
Democratic Robert A. Green 113,300 27.90
Democratic Ernest R. Graham 91,174 22.45
Democratic Frank D. Upchurch 30,524 7.52
Democratic Raymond Sheldon 27,940 6.88
Democratic J. Edwin Baker 27,028 6.66
Total votes 406,077 100.00
Democratic primary runoff results[4][2][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Millard F. Caldwell 215,485 55.31
Democratic Robert A. Green 174,100 44.69
Total votes 389,585 100.00

Republican primary

Candidates

Results

Republican primary results[5][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bert L. Acker 5,954 61.26
Republican Edward T. Keenan 3,766 38.75
Total votes 9,720 100.00

General election

Candidates

Results

1944 Florida gubernatorial election[6][7][8][9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Millard F. Caldwell 361,007 78.94%
Republican Bert L. Acker 96,321 21.06%
Majority 264,686 57.88%
Turnout 457,328 100.00%
Democratic hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "FL Governor, 1944 - D Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  2. ^ a b Florida Handbook 1965-66, p. 364.
  3. ^ a b c Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 105.
  4. ^ "FL Governor, 1944 - D Runoff". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  5. ^ "FL Governor, 1944 - R Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  6. ^ "FL Governor, 1944". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  7. ^ Florida Handbook 1965-66, p. 372.
  8. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 58–59.
  9. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 47.

Bibliography