1949 Philadelphia Phillies
Also known as the Philadelphia Blue Jays
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)R. R. M. Carpenter, R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
General manager(s)R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
Manager(s)Eddie Sawyer
Local televisionWPTZ/WCAU/WFIL
Local radioWIBG
(By Saam, George Walsh)
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Offseason

Regular season

On June 2, 1949, the Phillies matched a Major League record with five home runs in one inning in a 12–3 win over the Cincinnati Reds at Shibe Park.[5]

On August 19, 1949, the Phillies held "Eddie Waitkus Night" at Shibe Park. Waitkus was in uniform for the first time since being shot on June 14, 1949, in Chicago by an infatuated girl.

This marked the Phillies' first winning season since 1932, ending an MLB record of 16 consecutive losing seasons. This would remain the longest streak in league history until the Pirates suffered their 17th consecutive losing season in 2009.

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Brooklyn Dodgers 97 57 0.630 48–29 49–28
St. Louis Cardinals 96 58 0.623 1 51–26 45–32
Philadelphia Phillies 81 73 0.526 16 40–37 41–36
Boston Braves 75 79 0.487 22 43–34 32–45
New York Giants 73 81 0.474 24 43–34 30–47
Pittsburgh Pirates 71 83 0.461 26 36–41 35–42
Cincinnati Reds 62 92 0.403 35 35–42 27–50
Chicago Cubs 61 93 0.396 36 33–44 28–49

Record vs. opponents


Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 10–12 12–10 12–10–1 12–10–2 11–11 12–10 6–16
Brooklyn 12–10 17–5 17–5 14–8 11–11 16–6 10–12–1
Chicago 10–12 5–17 9–13 12–10 6–16 11–11 8–14
Cincinnati 10–12–1 5–17 13–9 7–15 13–9 9–13 5–17–1
New York 10–12–2 8–14 10–12 15–7 11–11 12–10 7–15
Philadelphia 11–11 11–11 16–6 9–13 11–11 13–9 10–12
Pittsburgh 10–12 6–16 11–11 13–9 10–12 9–13 12–10
St. Louis 16–6 12–10–1 14–8 17–5–1 15–7 12–10 10–12


Game log

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss (via forfeit)
  Phillies loss
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1949 Game Log[6]
Overall Record: 81–73
April (5–8)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
1 April 18 @ Braves 4–0 Ken Heintzelman (1–0) Johnny Sain (0–1) None 9,195 1–0
2 April 19 (1) @ Braves 3–4 Nels Potter (1–0) Ken Trinkle (0–1) None see 2nd game 1–1
3 April 19 (2) @ Braves 2–11 Vern Bickford (1–0) Russ Meyer (0–1) None 30,337 1–2
4 April 20 @ Braves 5–6 Nels Potter (2–0) Jim Konstanty (0–1) None 6,095 1–3
April 22 Dodgers Postponed (rain, wet grounds);[7][8] Makeup: June 30
5 April 23 Dodgers 6–8 Erv Palica (1–0) Robin Roberts (0–1) None 13,198 1–4
6 April 24 (1) Dodgers 7–4 Ken Heintzelman (2–0) Carl Erskine (0–1) None see 2nd game 2–4
7 April 24 (2) Dodgers 5–6 Ralph Branca (2–0) Curt Simmons (0–1) Jack Banta (1) 33,748 2–5
8 April 25 Giants 3–6 Clint Hartung (2–0) Hank Borowy (0–1) None 3,366 2–6
9 April 26 Giants 12–11 (11) Schoolboy Rowe (1–0) Andy Hansen (0–1) None 3,296 3–6
10 April 27 Braves 0–2 Warren Spahn (1–1) Robin Roberts (0–2) None 16,436 3–7
11 April 28 Braves 1–6 Vern Bickford (2–1) Jocko Thompson (0–1) None 2,417 3–8
12 April 29 @ Dodgers 5–2 Ken Heintzelman (3–0) Joe Hatten (1–1) None 8,090 4–8
13 April 30 @ Dodgers 12–4 Hank Borowy (1–1) Jack Banta (0–1) None 19,572 5–8
May (13–13)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
14 May 1 @ Dodgers 4–2 Russ Meyer (1–1) Preacher Roe (1–2) None 20,507 6–8
15 May 3 Cardinals 7–3 Robin Roberts (1–2) Ken Johnson (0–1) Ken Trinkle (1) 16,228 7–8
16 May 4 Cardinals 7–5 Ken Heintzelman (4–0) Al Brazle (2–1) Ken Trinkle (2) 14,169 8–8
17 May 5 Cardinals 2–3 Red Munger (1–0) Hank Borowy (1–2) None 4,354 8–9
18 May 6 Pirates 4–3 Russ Meyer (2–1) Elmer Riddle (0–2) None 15,754 9–9
19 May 7 Pirates 4–6 Hal Gregg (1–0) Schoolboy Rowe (1–1) None 6,832 9–10
20 May 8 (1) Reds 7–14 (12) Ken Raffensberger (3–3) Schoolboy Rowe (1–2) None see 2nd game 9–11
21 May 8 (2) Reds 8–1 (6)[a] Robin Roberts (2–2) Eddie Erautt (0–1) None 17,707 10–11
May 9 Reds Postponed (rain);[9] Makeup: June 3 as a traditional double-header
May 10 Reds Postponed (rain);[10] Makeup: June 3 as a traditional double-header
22 May 11 Cubs 2–4 Emil Kush (3–0) Ken Heintzelman (4–1) None 7,433 10–12
23 May 12 Cubs 4–3 Hank Borowy (2–2) Bob Rush (1–4) None 2,506 11–12
24 May 13 @ Giants 1–9 Larry Jansen (3–2) Russ Meyer (2–2) None 21,765 11–13
25 May 14 @ Giants 2–12 Sheldon Jones (4–3) Robin Roberts (2–3) None 17,867 11–14
26 May 15 @ Giants 3–7 Monty Kennedy (3–2) Curt Simmons (0–2) None 24,637 11–15
27 May 17 @ Cardinals 5–4 (12) Robin Roberts (3–3) Al Brazle (3–2) None 12,357 12–15
28 May 18 @ Cardinals 3–2 Curt Simmons (1–2) Ted Wilks (2–2) None 2,666 13–15
May 19 @ Cubs Postponed (weather,[11] wet grounds,[12] threatening weather[13]); Makeup: June 15 as a traditional double-header
May 20 @ Cubs Postponed (cold);[13] Makeup: July 30 as a traditional double-header
29 May 21 @ Cubs 5–1 Hank Borowy (3–2) Dutch Leonard (1–4) None 11,839 14–15
30 May 22 (1) @ Pirates 6–5 Robin Roberts (4–3) Elmer Riddle (0–4) Jim Konstanty (1) 31,467 15–15
May 22 (2) @ Pirates Postponed (rain and wet grounds);[14] Makeup: June 20
31 May 24 @ Reds 3–4 (11) Harry Gumbert (2–1) Curt Simmons (1–3) None 16,111 15–16
32 May 25 @ Reds 2–3 Buddy Lively (4–1) Ken Heintzelman (4–2) None 4,870 15–17
33 May 27 Giants 9–3 Curt Simmons (2–3) Clint Hartung (4–4) Jim Konstanty (2) 10,397 16–17
34 May 28 Giants 5–2 Hank Borowy (4–2) Larry Jansen (4–4) None 6,340 17–17
35 May 29 (1) Giants 2–4 (15) Dave Koslo (1–0) Jim Konstanty (0–2) None see 2nd game 17–18
36 May 29 (2) Giants 0–3 (7)[b] Hank Behrman (2–0) Russ Meyer (2–3) None 22,350 17–19
37 May 30 (1) Braves 3–7 Bill Voiselle (3–1) Ken Heintzelman (4–3) Nels Potter (3) see 2nd game 17–20
38 May 30 (2) Braves 6–5 (10) Russ Meyer (3–3) Bobby Hogue (0–1) None 21,933 18–20
39 May 31 Braves 6–7 Nels Potter (4–3) Schoolboy Rowe (1–3) None 2,386 18–21
June (20–11)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
40 June 1 Reds 4–3 (10) Robin Roberts (5–3) Harry Gumbert (2–3) None 6,845 19–21
41 June 2 Reds 12–3 Schoolboy Rowe (2–3) Ken Raffensberger (6–4) None 10,549 20–21
42 June 3 (1) Reds 2–3 Harry Gumbert (3–3) Jim Konstanty (0–3) None see 2nd game 20–22
43 June 3 (2) Reds 3–1 Russ Meyer (4–3) Buddy Lively (4–3) None 7,911 21–22
44 June 4 Cubs 1–0 Ken Heintzelman (5–3) Bob Rush (3–6) None 6,190 22–22
45 June 5 (1) Cubs 7–2 Hank Borowy (5–2) Johnny Schmitz (2–3) None see 2nd game 23–22
46 June 5 (2) Cubs 7–8 Bob Rush (4–6) Russ Meyer (4–4) None 15,240 23–23
47 June 7 Pirates 6–5 Schoolboy Rowe (3–3) Murry Dickson (2–8) None 12,105 24–23
48 June 8 Pirates 2–0 Robin Roberts (6–3) Tiny Bonham (0–2) None 10,136 25–23
49 June 9 Pirates 4–3 (18) Jim Konstanty (1–3) Murry Dickson (2–9) None 4,095 26–23
50 June 10 Cardinals 3–2 Ken Heintzelman (6–3) Al Brazle (6–3) None 23,332 27–23
51 June 11 Cardinals 2–6 Red Munger (4–2) Hank Borowy (5–3) None 12,199 27–24
52 June 12 (1) Cardinals 3–7 Harry Brecheen (5–3) Curt Simmons (2–4) None see 2nd game 27–25
53 June 12 (2) Cardinals 8–3 Robin Roberts (7–3) Gerry Staley (3–3) None 33,224 28–25
54 June 14 @ Cubs 9–2 Russ Meyer (5–4) Bob Muncrief (1–7) None 7,815 29–25
55 June 15 (1) @ Cubs 4–1 Ken Heintzelman (7–3) Bob Rush (4–8) None see 2nd game 30–25
56 June 15 (2) @ Cubs 3–0 Hank Borowy (6–3) Johnny Schmitz (2–5) Robin Roberts (1) 18,809 31–25
57 June 16 @ Cubs 4–3 Jim Konstanty (2–3) Bob Muncrief (1–8) None 4,899 32–25
58 June 17 @ Cardinals 8–0 Robin Roberts (8–3) Harry Brecheen (5–4) None 17,676 33–25
59 June 18 @ Cardinals 3–4 Howie Pollet (7–4) Curt Simmons (2–5) None 20,034 33–26
60 June 19 @ Cardinals 5–6 Ted Wilks (5–2) Robin Roberts (8–4) None 20,136 33–27
61 June 20 @ Pirates 7–1 Russ Meyer (6–4) Bill Werle (4–4) None 30,066 34–27
62 June 21 @ Pirates 9–4 Hank Borowy (7–3) Murry Dickson (2–10) None 32,332 35–27
63 June 22 @ Pirates 3–12 Vic Lombardi (1–1) Robin Roberts (8–5) None 8,957 35–28
64 June 23 @ Pirates 9–3 Curt Simmons (3–5) Elmer Riddle (1–7) None 10,283 36–28
June 24 @ Reds Postponed (rain);[15] Makeup: August 4 as a traditional double-header
65 June 25 @ Reds 6–5 Ken Heintzelman (8–3) Howie Fox (4–6) Robin Roberts (2) 5,681 37–28
66 June 26 (1) @ Reds 3–4 (10) Harry Gumbert (4–3) Curt Simmons (3–6) None see 2nd game 37–29
67 June 26 (2) @ Reds 2–5 Herm Wehmeier (2–3) Hank Borowy (7–4) None 14,522 37–30
68 June 28 Dodgers 3–5 Preacher Roe (7–2) Robin Roberts (8–6) None 22,997 37–31
69 June 29 Dodgers 1–5 Ralph Branca (10–1) Curt Simmons (3–7) None 36,814 37–32
70 June 30 Dodgers 4–2 Ken Heintzelman (9–3) Joe Hatten (6–4) None 9,660 38–32
July (12–15)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
71 July 1 @ Braves 1–2 (12) Vern Bickford (10–4) Hank Borowy (7–5) None 17,058 38–33
72 July 2 @ Braves 3–2 Blix Donnelly (1–0) Warren Spahn (9–7) None 21,661 39–33
73 July 3 @ Braves 7–0 Robin Roberts (9–6) Johnny Sain (5–9) None 10,540 40–33
74 July 4 (1) @ Dodgers 1–7 Preacher Roe (8–2) Curt Simmons (3–8) None see 2nd game 40–34
75 July 4 (2) @ Dodgers 4–8 Don Newcombe (6–2) Jocko Thompson (0–2) Jack Banta (2) 11,754 40–35
76 July 5 @ Dodgers 7–2 Ken Heintzelman (10–3) Joe Hatten (6–5) None 24,535 41–35
July 6 @ Giants Postponed (rain);[16] Makeup: August 13 as a traditional double-header
77 July 7 @ Giants 3–11 Dave Koslo (5–2) Hank Borowy (7–6) None 21,841 41–36
78 July 8 Braves 3–4 (16) Bobby Hogue (1–2) Schoolboy Rowe (3–4) None 11,238 41–37
79 July 9 Braves 3–4 Johnny Sain (6–9) Blix Donnelly (1–1) Nels Potter (7) 6,854 41–38
July 10 Braves Postponed (rain);[17] Makeup: September 4 as a traditional double-header
July 12 1949 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn
80 July 14 Cardinals 1–0 Ken Heintzelman (11–3) Max Lanier (0–1) None 13,379 42–38
81 July 15 Cardinals 0–1 Howie Pollet (12–5) Robin Roberts (9–7) None 14,395 42–39
82 July 16 Cardinals 4–2 Hank Borowy (8–6) Harry Brecheen (6–7) Jim Konstanty (3) 9,854 43–39
83 July 17 (1) Pirates 1–2 (5)[18] Cliff Chambers (5–1) Russ Meyer (6–5) None 12,761 43–40
July 17 (2) Pirates Postponed (rain);[19] Makeup: August 25 as a traditional double-header[20]
84 July 18 Pirates 2–7 Murry Dickson (4–11) Jim Konstanty (2–4) None 4,068 43–41
85 July 19 Cubs 1–0 Ken Heintzelman (12–3) Doyle Lade (0–1) None 7,076 44–41
86 July 20 Cubs 3–4 (11) Dutch Leonard (4–11) Curt Simmons (3–9) None 7,036 44–42
87 July 21 Cubs 8–4 Hank Borowy (9–6) Monk Dubiel (3–6) None 3,082 45–42
88 July 22 Reds 2–1 Russ Meyer (7–5) Kent Peterson (2–2) Robin Roberts (3) 10,905 46–42
89 July 23 Reds 8–2 Ken Heintzelman (13–3) Johnny Vander Meer (2–6) None 6,581 47–42
90 July 24 (1) Reds 1–10 Ken Raffensberger (10–9) Curt Simmons (3–10) None see 2nd game 47–43
91 July 24 (2) Reds 3–4 Herm Wehmeier (4–6) Robin Roberts (9–8) None 16,796 47–44
92 July 26 @ Cardinals 5–9 Harry Brecheen (8–7) Robin Roberts (9–9) None 21,052 47–45
93 July 27 @ Cardinals 3–7 Red Munger (9–4) Hank Borowy (9–7) None 19,984 47–46
94 July 28 @ Cardinals 2–10 Al Brazle (10–5) Ken Heintzelman (13–4) None 14,570 47–47
July 29 @ Cubs Postponed (rain);[21] Makeup: September 21 as a traditional double-header
95 July 30 (1) @ Cubs 4–3 Russ Meyer (8–5) Doyle Lade (1–2) None see 2nd game 48–47
96 July 30 (2) @ Cubs 9–1 Robin Roberts (10–9) Johnny Schmitz (6–8) None 33,461 49–47
97 July 31 @ Cubs 5–4 (10) Jim Konstanty (3–4) Bob Muncrief (3–9) None 18,926 50–47
August (14–15)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
98 August 2 @ Reds 3–11 Herm Wehmeier (6–6) Ken Heintzelman (13–5) None 9,097 50–48
99 August 3 @ Reds 0–2 Ken Raffensberger (11–11) Robin Roberts (10–10) None 2,690 50–49
100 August 4 (1) @ Reds 5–8 Kent Peterson (4–3) Russ Meyer (8–6) Ewell Blackwell (1) see 2nd game 50–50
101 August 4 (2) @ Reds 1–9 Johnny Vander Meer (3–6) Hank Borowy (9–8) None 5,709 50–51
102 August 5 @ Pirates 0–1 Bill Werle (8–8) Schoolboy Rowe (3–5) None 24,944 50–52
103 August 6 @ Pirates 4–3 Jim Konstanty (4–4) Harry Gumbert (5–5) None 13,260 51–52
104 August 7 (1) @ Pirates 7–3 Hank Borowy (10–8) Cliff Chambers (6–3) None see 2nd game 52–52
105 August 7 (2) @ Pirates 5–4 Jim Konstanty (5–4) Bob Chesnes (5–7) Robin Roberts (4) 27,928 53–52
106 August 9 Dodgers 1–8 Carl Erskine (2–1) Robin Roberts (10–11) None 21,463 53–53
107 August 10 Dodgers 5–7 Jack Banta (5–4) Jim Konstanty (5–5) None 16,426 53–54
108 August 11 Dodgers 7–10 Joe Hatten (10–6) Schoolboy Rowe (3–6) Jack Banta (3) 15,856 53–55
109 August 12 @ Giants 2–0 (7) Hank Borowy (11–8) Sheldon Jones (9–8) None 4,099 54–55
August 13 (1)[c] @ Giants Postponed (rain);[22] Makeup: August 14 as a traditional double-header
August 13 (2)[c] @ Giants Postponed (rain);[22] Makeup: September 6 as a traditional double-header
110 August 14 (1)[c] @ Giants 1–8 Dave Koslo (8–6) Robin Roberts (10–12) None see 2nd game 54–56
111 August 14 (2)[c] @ Giants 0–1 Larry Jansen (13–11) Russ Meyer (8–7) None 25,402 54–57
112 August 16 @ Dodgers 2–1 (12) Ken Heintzelman (14–5) Don Newcombe (11–5) None 20,071 55–57
113 August 17 @ Dodgers 11–7 Jim Konstanty (6–5) Erv Palica (7–7) Russ Meyer (1) 16,172 56–57
114 August 18 @ Dodgers 9–5 Hank Borowy (12–8) Rex Barney (6–7) Jim Konstanty (4) 7,327 57–57
115 August 19 Giants 7–1 Robin Roberts (11–12) Dave Koslo (8–7) None 19,654 58–57
116 August 20 Giants 9–3 Russ Meyer (9–7) Monty Kennedy (9–9) Jim Konstanty (5) 9,110 59–57
117 August 21 (1) Giants 4–0 Ken Heintzelman (15–5) Sheldon Jones (9–9) None see 2nd game 60–57
118 August 21 (2) Giants 2–4[d] (9) None None None 19,742 60–58
119 August 23 Reds 4–3 (13) Robin Roberts (12–12) Kent Peterson (4–5) None 6,976 61–58
120 August 25 (1) Pirates 1–5 Murry Dickson (7–12) Russ Meyer (9–8) None see 2nd game 61–59
121 August 25 (2) Pirates 4–2 Robin Roberts (13–12) Junior Walsh (1–2) None 7,179 62–59
122 August 26 Pirates 2–3 Bill Werle (10–9) Ken Heintzelman (15–6) None 9,586 62–60
123 August 27 Pirates 2–8 Tiny Bonham (7–4) Schoolboy Rowe (3–7) None 6,070 62–61
124 August 28 (1) Cubs 4–7 Doyle Lade (4–3) Hank Borowy (12–9) None see 2nd game 62–62
125 August 28 (2) Cubs 8–2 Russ Meyer (10–8) Dewey Adkins (0–3) None 12,719 63–62
126 August 29 Cubs 6–5 Blix Donnelly (2–1) Bob Muncrief (5–10) Jim Konstanty (6) 2,802 64–62
August 31 Cardinals Postponed (rain);[23] Makeup: September 1
September (16–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
127 September 1 Cardinals 0–4 Howie Pollet (17–8) Ken Heintzelman (15–7) None 14,138 64–63
128 September 2 Braves 6–3 Jim Konstanty (7–5) Bill Voiselle (6–5) None 6,538 65–63
129 September 3 Braves 10–4 Robin Roberts (14–12) Bob Hall (5–4) None 5,273 66–63
130 September 4 (1) Braves 9–8 Ken Trinkle (1–1) Nels Potter (6–9) None see 2nd game 67–63
131 September 4 (2) Braves 8–7 Curt Simmons (4–10) Vern Bickford (14–9) None 18,727 68–63
132 September 5 (1) @ Giants 9–7 Ken Heintzelman (16–7) Adrián Zabala (2–2) Jim Konstanty (7) see 2nd game 69–63
133 September 5 (2) @ Giants 4–2 Russ Meyer (11–8) Dave Koslo (8–11) None 16,577 70–63
134 September 6 (1)[c] @ Giants 4–2 (10) Jim Konstanty (8–5) Larry Jansen (15–14) None see 2nd game 71–63
135 September 6 (2)[c] @ Giants 1–4 Sheldon Jones (12–10) Hank Borowy (12–10) None 4,150 71–64
136 September 8 @ Braves 3–1 Russ Meyer (12–8) Johnny Sain (10–14) None 5,856 72–64
September 9 @ Braves Postponed (rain); Makeup:[24] September 11 as a traditional double-header
137 September 10 @ Braves 0–1 Warren Spahn (18–12) Robin Roberts (14–13) None 5,450 72–65
138 September 11 (1) @ Braves 3–1 Ken Heintzelman (17–7) Bill Voiselle (6–7) None see 2nd game 73–65
139 September 11 (2) @ Braves 6–3 Russ Meyer (13–8) Vern Bickford (14–10) Curt Simmons (1) 10,801 74–65
140 September 13 @ Pirates 6–11 Cliff Chambers (10–7) Hank Borowy (12–11) None 11,878 74–66
141 September 14 @ Pirates 12–4 Robin Roberts (15–13) Junior Walsh (1–4) None 3,920 75–66
142 September 16 @ Reds 1–2 Ken Raffensberger (16–15) Ken Heintzelman (17–8) None 1,185 75–67
143 September 17 @ Reds 4–0 Russ Meyer (14–8) Herm Wehmeier (11–10) None 2,065 76–67
144 September 18 @ Cardinals 3–15[25] Red Munger (15–6) Robin Roberts (15–14) Gerry Staley (5) 24,319 76–68
145 September 19 @ Cardinals 4–3 Jocko Thompson (1–2) Howie Pollet (19–9) None 16,874 77–68
146 September 20 @ Cardinals 5–7 Fred Martin (6–0) Ken Heintzelman (17–9) Gerry Staley (6) 9,642 77–69
147 September 21 (1) @ Cubs 3–1 Russ Meyer (15–8) Warren Hacker (5–8) None see 2nd game 78–69
148 September 21 (2) @ Cubs 6–9 Monk Dubiel (6–9) Robin Roberts (15–15) None 5,572 78–70
149 September 22 @ Cubs 2–3 Dewey Adkins (2–4) Hank Borowy (12–12) None 1,813 78–71
150 September 24 @ Dodgers 1–8 Don Newcombe (16–8) Jocko Thompson (1–3) None 34,083 78–72
151 September 25 @ Dodgers 5–3 Russ Meyer (16–8) Jack Banta (9–6) None 33,452 79–72
152 September 28 Giants 2–0 Russ Meyer (17–8) Sheldon Jones (15–12) None 1,996 80–72
October (1–1)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
153 October 1 Dodgers 6–4 Jim Konstanty (9–5) Preacher Roe (15–6) None 29,165 81–72
154 October 2 Dodgers 7–9 (10) Jack Banta (10–6) Ken Heintzelman (17–10) None 36,765 81–73
^[a] The second game on May 8, 1949, was called due to the Pennsylvania Sunday curfew at the end of the sixth inning with the score 8–1.[26][27][28]
^[b] The second game on May 29, 1949, was called due to the Pennsylvania Sunday curfew at the end of the seventh inning with the score 0–3.[29][30][31]
^[c] The original schedule indicated single games on August 13 (which became a double-header after the July 7 postponement), 14[32] (which became a double-header after the August 13 postponement), and 15[22] (later moved to September 6) with no games scheduled on September 6 (which became a double-header from the August 13 postponement and the August 15 schedule change).[33]
^[d] The second game on August 21, 1949, was forfeited in favor of the New York Giants.[34][35][36][37] Contemporary newspaper accounts indicate a 9–0 final score as a result of the forfeiture,[38] but Baseball-Reference indicates a 2–4 score and Phillies loss.[39]

Roster

1949 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Andy Seminick 109 334 81 .243 24 68
1B Dick Sisler 121 412 119 .289 7 50
2B Eddie Miller 85 266 55 .207 6 29
SS Granny Hamner 154 662 174 .263 6 53
3B Willie Jones 149 532 130 .244 19 77
OF Del Ennis 154 610 184 .302 25 110
OF Bill Nicholson 98 299 70 .234 11 40
OF Richie Ashburn 154 662 188 .284 1 37

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Stan Hollmig 81 251 64 .255 2 26
Stan Lopata 83 240 65 .271 8 27
Eddie Waitkus 54 209 64 .306 1 28
Mike Goliat 55 189 40 .212 3 19
Buddy Blattner 64 97 24 .247 5 21
Putsy Caballero 29 68 19 .279 0 3
Jackie Mayo 45 39 5 .128 0 2
Ed Sanicki 7 13 3 .231 3 7
Bill Glynn 8 10 2 .200 0 1
Johnny Blatnik 6 8 1 .125 0 0
Ken Silvestri 4 4 0 .000 0 0
Hal Wagner 1 4 0 .000 0 0
Bert Haas 2 1 0 .000 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Ken Heintzelman 33 250.0 17 10 3.02 65
Robin Roberts 43 226.2 15 15 3.69 95
Russ Meyer 37 213.0 17 8 3.08 78
Hank Borowy 28 193.1 12 12 4.19 73

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Curt Simmons 38 131.1 4 10 4.59 83
Blix Donnelly 23 78.1 2 1 5.06 36
Schoolboy Rowe 23 65.1 3 7 4.82 22
Jocko Thompson 8 31.1 1 3 6.89 12

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Jim Konstanty 53 9 5 7 3.25 43
Ken Trinkle 42 1 1 2 4.00 14
Charlie Bicknell 13 0 0 0 7.62 4
Bob Miller 3 0 0 0 0.00 0

Farm system

See also: Minor League Baseball

Level Team League Manager
AAA Toronto Maple Leafs International League Del Bissonette
A Utica Blue Sox Eastern League Patrick Colgan
B Terre Haute Phillies Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Leon Riley
B Wilmington Blue Rocks Interstate League Jack Sanford
B Portland Pilots New England League Skeeter Newsome
C Schenectady Blue Jays Canadian–American League Dick Carter
C Vandergrift Pioneers Middle Atlantic League George Savino
C Salina Blue Jays Western Association Joe Gantenbein
D Seaford Eagles Eastern Shore League Paul Galin
D Klamath Falls Gems Far West League Hub Kittle
D Americus Phillies Georgia–Florida League Eddie Murphy
D Carbondale Pioneers North Atlantic League Barney Lutz
D Bradford Blue Wings PONY League Dan Carnevale
D Appleton Papermakers Wisconsin State League Fred Clemence

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Portland, Bradford[40]

Notes

  1. ^ Harry Walker at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ Bob Chakales at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Tommy Lasorda at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ Ron Mrozinski at Baseball-Reference
  5. ^ "Sports Phlashback". Philadelphia Inquirer. June 2, 2015. p. D8.
  6. ^ "1949 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. ^ "Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. April 23, 1949. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  8. ^ "The Majors". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. April 23, 1949. p. 10. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  9. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. May 10, 1949. p. 14. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  10. ^ "Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. May 11, 1949. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  11. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 19, 1949. p. 44. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  12. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. May 20, 1949. p. 17. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  13. ^ a b "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 20, 1949. p. 40. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  14. ^ Biederman, Lester J. (May 23, 1949). "Bucs Fold on Schedule in Ninth: Phils Break 5-5 Tie On Sisler's Double; Dodgers Here Next". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 19. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  15. ^ "Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. June 25, 1949. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  16. ^ "The Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. July 7, 1949. p. 12. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  17. ^ "The Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. July 11, 1949. p. 14. Retrieved June 17, 2017.
  18. ^ Hernon, Jack (July 18, 1949). "Bucs Nip Phils in Five Innings, 2 to 1: Rain Halts Tilt In 6th Frame: Pirates Lose Last Run Scored; Chambers Wins 5th; Hits Triple". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 14. Retrieved June 12, 2017. [T]hen [rain] started to fall heavy in the last of the sixth, with the Bucs leading, 3-1. When it was called, the sixth inning was washed out completely, and the Bucs lost a run, making the final count, 2-1.
  19. ^ "The Major League Roundup". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. July 18, 1949. p. 14. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  20. ^ Biederman, Les (July 18, 1949). "Pirates Revise Philadelphia Story: Shibe Park Jinx Ends With Five-Inning 2-1 Victory for Chambers". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 16. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  21. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. July 30, 1949. p. 20. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c "The Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. August 14, 1949. p. 19. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  23. ^ "How They Stand". Meriden, CT: Meriden Daily Journal. September 1, 1949. p. 9. Retrieved June 16, 2017.
  24. ^ "The Majors". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. September 10, 1949. p. 10. Retrieved June 17, 2017.
  25. ^ "Cubs Rapped, 7-1; Phils Lose, 15-3: Musial, Northey, Slaughter Homer". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). September 19, 1949. p. 20. Retrieved June 19, 2017. Ron Northey ... found Robin Roberts an easy mark for a home run apiece[.] ... Northey's blow came in the third inning with the bases full following a rhubarb by the Phils. ... The argument came in the third when [Enos] Slaughter was batting with the count three and two. On the next pitch Umpire George Barr's right hand went into the air. The Phils thought it was a strikeout and on Andy Seminick's fast throw Marty Marion was caught in a rundown off second and tagged out. But Barr said it was a fourth ball, which nullified the play at second and filled the bases. Manager Eddie Sawyer and Russ Meyer were ordered out of the game for their part in the argument that followed. A few minutes later Barr went over to the Phils' dugout and put Cy Perkins off the field.
  26. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. May 9, 1949. p. 16. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  27. ^ "Nicholson's Hitting Gains Phils Split". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press (AP). May 9, 1949. p. 17. Retrieved June 12, 2017. The second game was halted after six innings by the Pennsylvania Blue Law curfew.
  28. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 8, Cincinnati Reds 1 (2)". retrosheet.org. May 8, 1949. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  29. ^ "Giants Win Double Bill From Phils". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). May 30, 1949. p. 4. Retrieved June 11, 2017.
  30. ^ "Giants Take Twin Bill From Phils; Nortons Defeat Insilcos In No-Hitter 6-1: Thomson's Homer Decides 15-Inning Marathon, 4-2". Meriden, CT: Meriden Daily Journal. May 30, 1949. p. 4. Retrieved June 11, 2017. The nightcap was cut short at the end of seven innings by Philadelphia's ancient curfew[.]
  31. ^ "New York Giants 3, Philadelphia Phillies 0 (2)". retrosheet.org. May 29, 1949. Retrieved June 11, 2017.
  32. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. August 13, 1949. p. 6. Retrieved June 13, 2017. Source indicates a double-header on Saturday followed by a single game on Sunday.
  33. ^ "Original Regular Season Schedules". retrosheet.org. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  34. ^ "Forfeit in Philly As Bottles Fly". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). August 22, 1949. p. 16. Retrieved June 22, 2017. The trouble started when Umpire George Barr ruled that Outfielder Richie Ashburn failed to catch a fly hit by the Giants' Joe Lafata. The Giants were ahead, 3-2, at the time with one out and Willard Marshall on third. He raced home with the fourth run. The fans began booing and throwing pop bottles, papers and beer cans. Umpire Lee Ballanfant was hit on the neck with a bottle and Al Barlick was hit in the back with a tomato. All three umpires then gathered at home plate and signaled the game was over. Eddie Sawyer, the Phillies' manager, left the field with the comment: 'It was the most stupid decision I have ever seen.' [In regulation games forfeited after four and one-half innings of play, all individual and team averages are incorporated in the official records, except that pitchers are not credited with a victory or charged with a loss.] (emphasis in the original).
  35. ^ "Victory By Forfeit Gives Giants Split With Phils: Umpires Award Nightcap to New York After Fans Bombard Them With Pop Bottles". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). August 22, 1949. pp. 14, 16. Retrieved June 22, 2017. The second game broke up in wild confusion as the set up their howl when Umpire George Barr ruled that Richie Ashburn didn't catch a long fly from the bat of Joe Lafata. ... Ashburn and the entire Phils' team charged in to argue with the umpires claiming that Ashburn had caught Lafata's drive. The first baseman's smash was a low liner which Ashburn grabbed near his shoe tops. Barr ruled Ashburn trapped the ball allowing it to touch the ground. George [sic] Ballanfant said he has been an umpire for more than 25 years and 'this is the first time something like this ever happened.' Neither Barlick nor Barr could recall any similar incident that resulted in a forfeiture of a game. 'Usually,' Barr said, 'a game is forfeited by a club's or a player's actions–not the fans.' Barr was at second base at the time of the disputed play. He said he saw everything. 'Ashburn never caught the ball,' Barr said. Of course that's the way I saw it. It's a matter of judgment and I guess I'm entitled to my decision.' The three umpires told an Associated Press reporter that the Phillies manager 'was not at fault.' The forfeit stunned the Phils. Manager Eddie Sawyer called it a 'stupid decision by the umpire.' He added: 'But they're the boss on the field, so there's nothing we can do about it. We can't protest that decision to anybody.'
  36. ^ "Umpires Call Game Following Fruit, Paper, Bottle Barrage: Giants Win by Forfeit Over Phillies". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. Associated Press (AP). August 22, 1949. p. 2 (Section 2). Retrieved June 22, 2017. A 15-minute barrage of pop bottles, over-ripe fruit and wads of paper forced Umpire Al Barlick to give the Giants a 9-0 forfeit victory in the nightcap of a Shibe Park doubleheader. He said he did it 'for the good of the people, baseball, and the players.' ... The ire of the Phil rooters—19,742 strong—was directed at Umpire George Barr. ... [Barlick] acted under a National League rule which says a game may be declared a forfeit if the field is not cleared within 15 minutes after the start of a rhubarb. ... [T]he pop bottles began to fly with jeering shouts of 'Kill the umpire.' ... 'I had to think of the safety of everyone,' Barlick said. 'And that meant fans sitting in the lower stands and were in danger of being struck by pop bottles, fruit and other missiles being thrown from the upper stands.'
  37. ^ "New York Giants 4, Philadelphia Phillies 2 (2)". retrosheet.org. August 21, 1949. Retrieved June 22, 2017. 1B umpire George Barr ruled Richie Ashburn trapped Joe Lafata's fly that went for a double; fans barraged the field with pop bottles and the game was forfeited to the Giants[.]
  38. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. August 22, 1949. p. 14. Retrieved June 22, 2017.
  39. ^ "New York Giants at Philadelphia Phillies Box Score, August 21, 1949". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. August 21, 1949.
  40. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References