1960 Ole Miss Rebels football
National Champion (FWAA) [1]
Sugar Bowl champion
SEC champion
Sugar Bowl, W 14–6 vs. Rice
ConferenceSoutheastern Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 3
APNo. 2
Record10–0–1 (5–0–1 SEC)
Head coach
Home stadiumHemingway Stadium
(Capacity: 34,500)
Crump Stadium
(Capacity: 25,000)
Seasons
← 1959
1961 →
1960 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   T W   L   T
No. 2 Ole Miss $ 5 0 1 10 0 1
No. 18 Florida 5 1 0 9 2 0
No. 9 Alabama 5 1 1 8 1 2
No. 13 Auburn 5 2 0 8 2 0
Tennessee 3 2 2 6 2 2
Georgia 4 3 0 6 4 0
Georgia Tech 4 4 0 5 5 0
LSU 2 3 1 5 4 1
Kentucky 2 4 1 5 4 1
Tulane 1 4 1 3 6 1
Mississippi State 0 5 1 2 6 1
Vanderbilt 0 7 0 3 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1960 Ole Miss Rebels football team represented the University of Mississippi during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. In their fourteenth season under head coach Johnny Vaught, the Rebels compiled a 10–0–1 record and won their fourth Southeastern Conference (SEC) championship. Their only blemish was a 6–6 tie against LSU. Mississippi was the only major-conference team in the nation that finished the season undefeated on the field (Missouri subsequently was credited with an undefeated season when its lone loss to Kansas was erased by forfeit).

The final Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI) polls placed the Rebels second and third, respectively, behind the Minnesota Golden Gophers who were voted national champions before the bowl games. The major "wire-service" polls changed this policy following the 1965 season. The final AP poll of November 29 was one of the closest ever: Minnesota with 17½ first-place votes, Mississippi 16, and Iowa 12½. Students made “AP” and “UPI” dummies, hung them from the Union Building, and burned them while chanting, “We’re No. 1, to hell with AP and UPI.”[2] The No. 1 Gophers, however, subsequently lost the Rose Bowl to No. 6 Washington. Meanwhile, No. 2 Ole Miss defeated Rice, 14–6, in the Sugar Bowl. Quarterback Jake Gibbs was voted the game's MVP by scoring two rushing touchdowns.

After the New Year's Day bowl games, the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) voted Mississippi as national champions and awarded them the Grantland Rice Trophy.[3][4][5] This is the only one of Mississippi's three claimed national championships officially recognized by the NCAA.[6] Ole Miss has never finished a season No. 1 in either the AP or Coaches Poll.[7]

Schedule

In the Egg Bowl, Ole Miss beat Mississippi State, 35–9. Ole Miss held the lead in the series with 29 wins, 24 losses and 4 ties. In the Magnolia Bowl, Ole Miss tied LSU, 6–6. LSU held the lead in the series with 27 wins, 20 losses, and 2 ties.

DateOpponentRankSiteResultSource
September 17at Houston*No. 2W 42–0
September 24KentuckyNo. 1W 21–6
October 1at Memphis State*No. 1
  • Crump Stadium
  • Memphis, Tennessee
W 31–20
October 8at VanderbiltNo. 2W 21–6
October 15at TulaneNo. 1W 26–13[8]
October 22at No. 11 Arkansas*No. 2W 10–7
October 29LSUNo. 2T 6–6
November 5Chattanooga*No. 6
  • Hemingway Stadium
  • Oxford, Mississippi
W 45–0[9]
November 12at No. 14 TennesseeNo. 4W 24–3[10]
November 26Mississippi StateNo. 3
  • Hemingway Stadium
  • Oxford, Mississippi (Egg Bowl)
W 35–9
January 2, 1961vs. Rice*No. 2
W 14–6
  • *Non-conference game
  • Rankings from AP Poll released prior to the game

*Schedule Source:[11]

Roster

1961 NFL Draft

Player Round Pick Position Club
Bobby Crespino 1 10 Halfback Cleveland Browns
Jerry Daniels 5 67 Tackle New York Giants
Allen Green 8 109 Center New York Giants
Jake Gibbs 9 125 Quarterback Cleveland Browns
Bob Benton 11 151 Tackle New York Giants
Doug Elmore 13 171 Back Washington Redskins
Charley Taylor 15 209 Back Cleveland Browns

Awards and honors

References

  1. ^ NCAA. "National Poll Champions" (PDF). 2020 NCAA Division I Football records. NCAA.org. p. 117. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  2. ^ "1961 - How They Got There".
  3. ^ Travers, Steven (2009-10-16). Pigskin Warriors: 140 Years of College Football's Greatest Traditions, Games, and Stars. Taylor Trade Publications. ISBN 978-1-58979-458-0.
  4. ^ "FWAA > Awards > Grantland Rice Trophy > Winners". www.sportswriters.net. Retrieved 2021-12-20.
  5. ^ Boyles, Bob; Guido, Paul (2008-08-04). The USA TODAY College Football Encyclopedia 2008-2009: A Comprehensive Modern Reference to America's Most Colorful Sport, 1953-Present. Skyhorse Publishing Inc. ISBN 978-1-60239-331-8.
  6. ^ "FBS Football Championship History | NCAA.com". www.ncaa.com. Retrieved 2021-12-20.
  7. ^ "FBS College Football History". NCAA.com. Retrieved 2015-12-09.
  8. ^ "No. 1 Rebels thump Tulane Wave, 26–13". The Clarion-Ledger. October 16, 1960. Retrieved September 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Ole Miss swats Moccasins, 45–0". The Clarion-Ledger. November 6, 1960. Retrieved September 10, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Gibbs leads Rebel raid on Vols, 24–3". The Knoxville News-Sentinel. November 13, 1960. Retrieved April 12, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ DeLassus, David. "Mississippi Yearly Results: 1960–1964". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2012-10-20. Retrieved March 22, 2013.