1963 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 8 – October 6, 1963
Number of games162
Number of teams20
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Elston Howard (NYY)
NL: Sandy Koufax (LAD)
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upChicago White Sox
NL championsLos Angeles Dodgers
  NL runners-upSt. Louis Cardinals
World Series
ChampionsLos Angeles Dodgers
  Runners-upNew York Yankees
World Series MVPSandy Koufax (LAD)
MLB seasons

The 1963 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 8 to October 6, 1963. The American League and National League both featured ten teams, with each team playing a 162-game schedule.

In the World Series, the Los Angeles Dodgers swept the New York Yankees in four straight games. The Dodgers' stellar pitching staff, anchored by left-hander Sandy Koufax and right-hander Don Drysdale, was so dominant that the vaunted Yankees, despite the presence of sluggers such as Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris in their lineup, never took a lead against Los Angeles the entire Series.

Champions

Major League Baseball

Awards and honors

Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Carl Yastrzemski BOS .321 Tommy Davis LAD .326
HR Harmon Killebrew MIN 45 Hank Aaron MIL
Willie McCovey SF
44
RBI Dick Stuart BOS 118 Hank Aaron MIL 130
Wins Whitey Ford NYY 24 Sandy Koufax1 LAD
Juan Marichal SF
25
ERA Gary Peters CHW 2.33 Sandy Koufax1 LAD 1.88
SO Camilo Pascual MIN 202 Sandy Koufax1 LAD 306
SV Stu Miller BAL 27 Lindy McDaniel CHC 22
SB Luis Aparicio BAL 40 Maury Wills LAD 40

1 National League Triple Crown Pitching Winner

Season recap

In the American League, the Yankees were in the 4th of 5 straight pennant winning years, and, led by MVP Elston Howard, cruised to the American League title by 10.5 games over the 2nd place White Sox.

In the National League, most experts figured the San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers would be locked in another battle for the pennant, much like 1962 when the Giants came from behind and beat the Dodgers in a playoff. The Dodgers started slowly, perhaps feeling the hangover effect from blowing the pennant the year before. They were 2 games under .500 in early May, and trailed the surprising St. Louis Cardinals by 4.5 games. Then their pitching asserted itself, and on August 28, the Dodgers led the Giants by 5.5 games and the Cardinals by 6.5 games. The Cardinals proceeded to win 19 of their next 20 games and, while the Dodgers didn't exactly slump, they went "only" 14–7 during that same period. Thus, the Dodgers went into St. Louis on September 16 to play the Cardinals in a 3-game series leading by only 1 game. With the memory of blowing the 1962 pennant fresh in their minds, the Dodgers proceeded to sweep the Cardinals and take a 4-game lead with 7 games to go. The key game was the third one; the Cardinals led 5–1 in the 8th inning and a win would move them back to within 2 games of L.A. But the Dodgers got 3 in the 8th and in the top of the 9th, late season call up Dick Nen, in only his 8th major league at bat, hit a pinch hit homer to force extra innings. The Cardinals got a leadoff triple from Dick Groat in the 10th but could not score. The Dodgers then scored an unearned run in the 13th inning and won, 6–5. The disheartened Cardinals then lost their next 3 games as well while the Dodgers won 3 of their next 4 to clinch the pennant with 6 games left.

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
       
  AL New York Yankees 0
  NL Los Angeles Dodgers 4

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Billy Hitchcock
Boston Red Sox Johnny Pesky
Chicago White Sox Al López
Cleveland Indians Birdie Tebbetts
Detroit Tigers Bob Scheffing Replaced during the season by Chuck Dressen
Kansas City Athletics Ed Lopat
Los Angeles Angels Bill Rigney
Minnesota Twins Sam Mele
New York Yankees Ralph Houk Won the American League pennant
Washington Senators Mickey Vernon Replaced during the season by Gil Hodges

National League

Team Manager Comments
Chicago Cubs College of Coaches
Cincinnati Reds Fred Hutchinson
Houston Colt .45's Harry Craft
Los Angeles Dodgers Walter Alston Won the World Series
Milwaukee Braves Bobby Bragan
New York Mets Casey Stengel
Philadelphia Phillies Gene Mauch
Pittsburgh Pirates Danny Murtaugh
San Francisco Giants Alvin Dark
St. Louis Cardinals Johnny Keane

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[1] 99 -2.9% 2,538,602 -7.9% 31,341
San Francisco Giants[2] 88 -14.6% 1,571,306 -1.3% 19,399
Minnesota Twins[3] 91 0.0% 1,406,652 -1.8% 17,366
New York Yankees[4] 104 8.3% 1,308,920 -12.4% 16,362
St. Louis Cardinals[5] 93 10.7% 1,170,546 22.7% 14,451
Chicago White Sox[6] 94 10.6% 1,158,848 2.4% 14,132
New York Mets[7] 51 27.5% 1,080,108 17.1% 13,335
Chicago Cubs[8] 82 39.0% 979,551 60.6% 12,093
Boston Red Sox[9] 76 0.0% 942,642 28.6% 11,783
Philadelphia Phillies[10] 87 7.4% 907,141 19.0% 11,199
Cincinnati Reds[11] 86 -12.2% 858,805 -12.6% 10,603
Detroit Tigers[12] 79 -7.1% 821,952 -32.0% 10,148
Los Angeles Angels[13] 70 -18.6% 821,015 -28.2% 10,136
Pittsburgh Pirates[14] 74 -20.4% 783,648 -28.1% 9,675
Baltimore Orioles[15] 86 11.7% 774,343 -2.0% 9,560
Milwaukee Braves[16] 84 -2.3% 773,018 0.8% 9,427
Kansas City Athletics[17] 73 1.4% 762,364 19.9% 9,412
Houston Colt .45s[18] 66 3.1% 719,502 -22.2% 8,883
Cleveland Indians[19] 79 -1.3% 562,507 -21.4% 6,945
Washington Senators[20] 56 -6.7% 535,604 -26.6% 6,695

Events

Births

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Deaths

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Uniforms

In an attempt to create an identity distinguishable from all other teams, Kansas City Athletics owner Charlie Finley changed the team uniforms to kelly green and yellow. This tradition of "green and gold" has been preserved to this day, although the kelly green has since been replaced with forest green. Finley also changed the Athletics' cleats to white instead of the standard black. Coaches and managers were also given white hats, which were dropped when the Athletics adopted new colors in 1993. The white cleats were dropped in 2000, but were revived in 2008.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ Snyder, John (2010). 365 Oddball Days in Chicago Cubs History. United States: Accessible Publishing Systems. p. 570. ISBN 9781459607255..
  22. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Book of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. pp. 352. ISBN 9781402742736.