1965 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 12 – October 14, 1965
Number of games162
Number of teams20
TV partner(s)NBC, CBS, ABC
Draft
Top draft pickRick Monday
Picked byKansas City Athletics
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Zoilo Versalles (MIN)
NL: Willie Mays (SF)
AL championsMinnesota Twins
  AL runners-upChicago White Sox
NL championsLos Angeles Dodgers
  NL runners-upSan Francisco Giants
World Series
ChampionsLos Angeles Dodgers
  Runners-upMinnesota Twins
World Series MVPSandy Koufax (LA)
MLB seasons

The 1965 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 12 to October 14, 1965. The Los Angeles Dodgers and Minnesota Twins were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Dodgers then defeated the Twins in the World Series, four games to three.

The Houston Colt .45s became the Houston Astros, as they moved from Colt Stadium to the new Astrodome, becoming the first team to play their home games indoors, rather than outdoors. It was also the final season for the Milwaukee Braves, before relocating and becoming the Atlanta Braves for the 1966 season. The Los Angeles Angels officially changed their name to California Angels on September 2, 1965, with only 28 games left in the season, in advance of their pending 1966 move to a new stadium in Anaheim, California.

In June, the first Major League Baseball draft was held in New York City. Teams chose players in reverse order of the previous season's standings, with picks alternating between American League and National League teams.[1] With the first pick of the 1965 MLB draft, the Kansas City Athletics took Rick Monday, an outfielder from Arizona State University.[2]

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Tony Oliva MIN .321 Roberto Clemente PIT .329
HR Tony Conigliaro BOS 32 Willie Mays SF 52
RBI Rocky Colavito CLE 108 Deron Johnson CIN 130
Wins Mudcat Grant MIN 21 Sandy Koufax1 LA 26
ERA Sam McDowell CLE 2.18 Sandy Koufax1 LA 2.04
SO Sam McDowell CLE 325 Sandy Koufax1 LA 382
SV Ron Kline WSH 29 Ted Abernathy CHC 31
SB Bert Campaneris KC 51 Maury Wills LA 94

1 National League Triple Crown Pitching Winner

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
       
  AL Minnesota Twins 3
  NL Los Angeles Dodgers 4

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Hank Bauer
Boston Red Sox Billy Herman
Los Angeles/California Angels Bill Rigney
Chicago White Sox Al López
Cleveland Indians Birdie Tebbetts
Detroit Tigers Chuck Dressen Replaced temporarily by Bob Swift while recovering from a heart attack
Kansas City Athletics Mel McGaha Replaced during the season by Haywood Sullivan
Minnesota Twins Sam Mele Won the American League pennant
New York Yankees Johnny Keane
Washington Senators Gil Hodges

National League

Team Manager Comments
Chicago Cubs College of Coaches Head Coach was Bob Kennedy
Cincinnati Reds Dick Sisler
Houston Astros Lum Harris
Los Angeles Dodgers Walter Alston Won the World Series
Milwaukee Braves Bobby Bragan
New York Mets Casey Stengel Replaced during the season by Wes Westrum
Philadelphia Phillies Gene Mauch
Pittsburgh Pirates Harry Walker
San Francisco Giants Herman Franks
St. Louis Cardinals Red Schoendienst

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[3] 97 21.3% 2,553,577 14.6% 31,526
Houston Astros[4] 65 -1.5% 2,151,470 196.4% 26,561
New York Mets[5] 50 -5.7% 1,768,389 2.1% 21,566
San Francisco Giants[6] 95 5.6% 1,546,075 2.8% 19,087
Minnesota Twins[7] 102 29.1% 1,463,258 21.2% 18,065
St. Louis Cardinals[8] 80 -14.0% 1,241,201 8.6% 15,323
New York Yankees[9] 77 -22.2% 1,213,552 -7.1% 14,621
Philadelphia Phillies[10] 85 -7.6% 1,166,376 -18.2% 14,580
Chicago White Sox[11] 95 -3.1% 1,130,519 -9.6% 13,957
Cincinnati Reds[12] 89 -3.3% 1,047,824 21.5% 12,936
Detroit Tigers[13] 89 4.7% 1,029,645 26.2% 12,712
Cleveland Indians[14] 87 10.1% 934,786 43.1% 11,400
Pittsburgh Pirates[15] 90 12.5% 909,279 19.7% 11,089
Baltimore Orioles[16] 94 -3.1% 781,649 -30.0% 9,894
Boston Red Sox[17] 62 -13.9% 652,201 -26.2% 8,052
Chicago Cubs[18] 72 -5.3% 641,361 -14.7% 7,727
Los Angeles/California Angels[19] 75 -8.5% 566,727 -25.5% 7,084
Washington Senators[20] 70 12.9% 560,083 -6.7% 6,915
Milwaukee Braves[21] 86 -2.3% 555,584 -39.0% 6,859
Kansas City Athletics[22] 59 3.5% 528,344 -17.8% 6,523

Events

January–April

May–August

September–December

See also

References

  1. ^ Koppett, Leonard (February 28, 1965). "Baseball's New Draft" (PDF). The New York Times. p. 2-S. Retrieved August 28, 2015.
  2. ^ "826 Players Picked in Baseball Draft". The Burlington Free Press. Burlington, Vermont. AP. June 10, 1965. p. 26. Retrieved August 7, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.