1970 NAIA Division I football season
Regular seasonAugust–November 1970
PostseasonNovember 28–December 12, 1970
National ChampionshipGreenville, SC
ChampionsTexas A&I (3)

The 1970 NAIA Division I football season was the 15th season of college football sponsored by the NAIA. It was also the first of twenty-seven seasons that the NAIA split its football competition into two separate championships.

The season was played from August to November 1970 and culminated in the 1970 NAIA Champion Bowl, played on December 12, 1970 in Greenville, South Carolina.[1]

Texas A&I defeated Wofford in the Champion Bowl, 48–7, to win their third NAIA national title.[2]

Conference standings

1970 Carolinas Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Presbyterian $ 5 0 0     8 3 0
Lenoir–Rhyne 4 1 0     7 4 0
Catawba 2 3 0     5 5 0
Elon 2 3 0     3 7 0
Newberry 1 4 0     4 7 0
Guilford 1 4 0     2 8 0
  • $ – Conference champion
1970 Evergreen Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Central Washington $ 5 0 0     7 3 0
Western Washington 5 1 0     5 5 0
Oregon College 4 2 0     5 5 0
Eastern Washington 3 4 0     4 6 0
Eastern Oregon 2 3 0     5 4 0
Whitworth 2 3 0     2 7 0
Southern Oregon 1 5 0     1 9 0
Oregon Tech 0 4 0     0 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
1970 Lone Star Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 7 Texas A&I $^ 8 1 0     11 1 0
No. T–20 Sam Houston State 7 2 0     8 2 1
Sul Ross 6 3 0     7 3 0
Angelo State 6 3 0     6 4 0
Southwest Texas State 4 5 0     6 5 0
Howard Payne 4 5 0     5 5 0
East Texas State 4 5 0     5 6 0
McMurry 4 5 0     5 6 0
Tarleton State 1 8 0     1 8 0
Stephen F. Austin 1 8 0     1 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
  • ^ – NAIA Division I playoff participant
Rankings from AP Poll
1970 Nebraska College Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Wayne State (NE) $ 3 0 0     7 2 0
Kearney State 2 1 0     8 2 0
Chadron State 1 2 0     5 4 0
Peru State 0 3 0     2 8 0
  • $ – Conference champion
1970 Oklahoma Collegiate Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
SW Oklahoma State $ 7 0 1     8 1 1
Northeastern State 6 1 1     8 1 1
Central State (OK) 6 2 0     9 2 0
Cameron 6 2 0     8 2 1
East Central 4 4 0     6 4 0
NW Oklahoma State 2 5 1     4 5 1
Panhandle 2 6 0     4 7 0
Langston 1 7 0     1 10 0
SE Oklahoma State 0 7 1     0 9 1
  • $ – Conference champion
1970 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Mountain Division
Western New Mexico xy 5 1 0     5 4 0
Southern Utah x 5 1 0     6 3 0
Adams State 4 2 0     4 3 2
Westminster (UT) 3 3 0     4 6 0
Western State (CO) 2 4 0     2 7 0
Fort Lewis 1 5 0     1 8 0
Colorado Mines 1 5 0     1 9 0
Plains Division
Pittsburg State xy$ 4 1 0     9 2 0
Northern Colorado x 4 1 0     7 2 0
Nebraska–Omaha 4 2 0     4 5 1
Fort Hays State 2 3 0     5 5 0
Southern Colorado 1 4 0     4 5 0
Emporia State 1 4 0     1 8 0
Washburn * 0 0 0     5 3 2
Championship: Pittsburg State 52, Western New Mexico 6
  • $ – Conference champion
  • x – Division champion/co-champions
  • y – Championship game participant
  • * – Washburn was ineligible for conference title
1970 South Dakota Intercollegiate Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Black Hills State + 5 1 0     8 2 0
Northern State + 5 1 0     6 4 0
South Dakota Tech + 5 1 0     5 4 0
Dakota State 3 3 0     5 4 0
Dakota Wesleyan 2 4 0     3 6 0
Huron 1 5 0     ? ? ?
Southern State 0 6 0     ? ? ?
  • $ – Conference champion

Postseason

Semifinals
November 28, 1970
1970 Champion Bowl
December 12, 1970
Greenville, SC
      
Wisconsin State–Platteville 0
Texas A&I* 16
Texas A&I 48
Wofford *7
New Mexico Highlands 23
Wofford* 28

References

  1. ^ "NAIA Championship History" (PDF). NAIA. pp. 4–11. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 15, 2015. Retrieved November 27, 2015.
  2. ^ "1970 Division I NAIA Football Playoffs". JonFMorse.com. Retrieved November 27, 2015.