1979 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 1 – December 17, 1979
Playoffs
Start dateDecember 23, 1979
AFC ChampionsPittsburgh Steelers
NFC ChampionsLos Angeles Rams
Super Bowl XIV
DateJanuary 20, 1980
SiteRose Bowl, Pasadena, California
ChampionsPittsburgh Steelers
Pro Bowl
DateJanuary 27, 1980
SiteAloha Stadium
1979 NFL season is located in the United States
Colts
Colts
Patriots
Patriots
Bills
Bills
Dolphins
Dolphins
Jets
Jets
Bengals
Bengals
Browns
Browns
Oilers
Oilers
Steelers
Steelers
Broncos
Broncos
Chiefs
Chiefs
Raiders
Raiders
Chargers
Chargers
Seahawks
Seahawks
AFC teams:
Yellow ffff00 pog.svg
West,
DeepPink pog.svg
Central,
Green pog.svg
East
1979 NFL season is located in the United States
Cowboys
Cowboys
Giants
Giants
Eagles
Eagles
Cardinals
Cardinals
Redskins
Redskins
Bears
Bears
Lions
Lions
Packers
Packers
Vikings
Vikings
Buccaneers
Buccaneers
Falcons
Falcons
Rams
Rams
Saints
Saints
49ers
49ers
NFC teams:
Yellow ffff00 pog.svg
West,
DeepPink pog.svg
Central,
Green pog.svg
East
The Steelers playing the Rams in Super Bowl XIV.
The Steelers playing the Rams in Super Bowl XIV.

The 1979 NFL season was the 60th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended with Super Bowl XIV when the Pittsburgh Steelers repeated as champions by defeating the Los Angeles Rams 31–19 at the Rose Bowl. The Steelers became the first team to win back-to-back Super Bowls twice.[1][2]

Draft

The 1979 NFL Draft was held from May 3 to 4, 1979 at New York City's Waldorf Astoria New York. With the first pick, the Buffalo Bills selected linebacker Tom Cousineau from the Ohio State University.

New Officials

Jerry Seeman was promoted to referee succeeding Don Wedge who returned to being a deep wing official, primarily as a back judge, where he continued to officiate through 1995. Seeman served as a crew chief for 12 seasons, working Super Bowl XXIII and Super Bowl XXV before leaving the field to succeed Art McNally as NFL Vice President of Officiating from 1991 to 2001.

Major rule changes

Division Races

Starting in 1978, ten teams qualified for the playoffs: the winners of each of the divisions, and two wild-card teams in each conference.

National Football Conference

Week NFC East NFC Central NFC West Wild Card Wild Card
1 Dallas, Philadelphia 1–0 3 teams 1–0 Atlanta 1–0
2 Dallas 2–0 Tampa Bay, Chicago 2–0 Atlanta 2–0
3 Dallas 3–0 Tampa Bay 3–0 Atlanta, L.A. 2–1
4 Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington 3–1 Tampa Bay 4–0 Atlanta, L.A. 2–2 Chicago 2–2 Minnesota 2–2
5 Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington 4–1 Tampa Bay 5–0 L.A. 3–2 Minnesota 3–2 4 teams 2–3
6 Dallas, Philadelphia 5–1 Tampa Bay 5–1 L.A. 4–2 Washington 4–2 3 teams 3–3
7 Dallas, Philadelphia 6–1 Tampa Bay 5–2 L.A. 4–3 Washington 5–2 5 teams 3–4
8 Dallas 7–1 Tampa Bay 6–2 L.A., New Orleans 4–4 Philadelphia, Washington 6–2 Minnesota 4–4
9 Dallas 7–2 Tampa Bay 7–2 New Orleans 5–4 Philadelphia, Washington 6–3 4 teams 4–5
10 Dallas 8–2 Tampa Bay 7–3 L.A., New Orleans 5–5 Philadelphia, Washington 6–4 Chicago 5–5
11 Dallas 8–3 Tampa Bay 8–3 New Orleans 6-5 Philadelphia, Washington 7–4 Chicago 6–5
12 Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington 8–4 Tampa Bay 9–3 L.A., New Orleans 6–6 Chicago 7–5 Giants, Minnesota 5–7
13 Philadelphia 9–4 Tampa Bay 9–4 L.A., New Orleans 7–6 Dallas, Washington 8–5 Chicago 7–6
14 Philadelphia 10–4 Tampa Bay 9–5 L.A. 8–6 Dallas, Washington 9–5 Chicago 8–6
15 Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington 10–5 Tampa Bay, Chicago 9–6 L.A. 9–6 Minnesota, New Orleans 7–8 Giants 6–9
16 Dallas 11–5 Tampa Bay 10–6 Los Angeles 9–7 Philadelphia 11–5 Chicago 10–6

American Football Conference

Week AFC East AFC Central AFC West Wild Card Wild Card
1 Miami 1–0 3 teams 1–0 4 teams 1–0
2 Miami 2–0 Pittsburgh, Cleveland 2–0 San Diego 2–0
3 Miami 3–0 Pittsburgh, Cleveland 3–0 San Diego 3–0 3 teams 2–1
4 Miami 4–0 Pittsburgh, Cleveland 4–0 San Diego, Denver 3–1 New England, Houston 3–1 Buffalo, Kansas City 2–2
5 Miami 4–1 Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Houston 4–1 San Diego 4–1 4 teams 3–2 Jets, Oakland 2–3
6 Miami, N.E. 4–2 Pittsburgh 5–1 S.D., Denver, Kansas City 4–2 Cleveland, Houston 4–2 Buffalo, Oakland 3–3
7 Miami, N.E. 5–2 Pittsburgh, Houston 5–2 San Diego, Denver 5–2 3 teams 4–3 Buffalo, Jets 3–4
8 New England 6–2 Pittsburgh 6–2 San Diego 6–2 4 teams 5–3 3 teams 4–4
9 Miami, N.E. 6–3 Pittsburgh 7–2 San Diego, Denver 6–3 Cleveland, Houston 6–3 Oakland 5–4
10 New England 7–3 Pittsburgh 8–2 San Diego, Denver 7–3 Cleveland, Houston 7–3 Miami, Oakland 6–4
11 Miami, N.E. 7–4 Pittsburgh 9–2 San Diego, Denver 8–3 Houston 8–3 Cleveland 7–4
12 New England 8–4 Pittsburgh, Houston 9–3 San Diego, Denver 9–3 Cleveland 8–4 Miami 7–5
13 Miami, N.E. 8–5 Pittsburgh, Houston 10–3 San Diego 10–3 Denver 9–4 Cleveland 8–5
14 Miami 9–5 Pittsburgh 11–3 San Diego, Denver 10–4 Houston 10–4 Cleveland 9–5
15 Miami 10–5 Pittsburgh, Houston 11–4 San Diego 11–4 Denver 10–5 Cleveland, Oakland 9–6
16 Miami 10–6 Pittsburgh 12–4 San Diego 12–4 Houston 11–5 Denver 10–6

Final standings

Tiebreakers

Playoffs

The Buccaneers playing against the Eagles in 1979 NFC Divisional Playoff Game.
The Buccaneers playing against the Eagles in 1979 NFC Divisional Playoff Game.

Main article: 1979–80 NFL playoffs

Dec 30 – Texas Stadium
3 Los Angeles 21
Dec 23 – Veterans Stadium Jan 6 – Tampa Stadium
1* Dallas 19
NFC
5 Chicago 17 3 Los Angeles 9
Dec 29 – Tampa Stadium
4 Philadelphia 27 2 Tampa Bay 0
NFC Championship
4 Philadelphia 17
Jan 20 – Rose Bowl
2* Tampa Bay 24
Divisional playoffs
Wild Card playoffs N3 Los Angeles 19
Dec 29 – San Diego Stadium
A2 Pittsburgh 31
Super Bowl XIV
4 Houston 17
Dec 23 – Astrodome Jan 6 – Three Rivers Stadium
1 San Diego 14
AFC
5 Denver 7 4 Houston 13
Dec 30 – Three Rivers Stadium
4 Houston 13 2 Pittsburgh 27
AFC Championship
3 Miami 14
2 Pittsburgh 34


Note: The Dallas Cowboys (the NFC 1 seed) did not play the Philadelphia Eagles (the 4 seed) in the Divisional playoff round because both teams were in the same division.

Statistical leaders

Team

Points scored Pittsburgh Steelers (416)
Total yards gained Pittsburgh Steelers (6,258)
Yards rushing New York Jets (2,646)
Yards passing San Diego Chargers (3,915)
Fewest points allowed Tampa Bay Buccaneers (237)
Fewest total yards allowed Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3,949)
Fewest rushing yards allowed Denver Broncos (1,693)
Fewest passing yards allowed Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2,076)

Awards

Most Valuable Player Earl Campbell, running back, Houston Oilers
Coach of the Year Jack Pardee, Washington
Offensive Player of the Year Earl Campbell, running back, Houston Oilers
Defensive Player of the Year Lee Roy Selmon, defensive end, Tampa Bay
Offensive Rookie of the Year Ottis Anderson, running back, St. Louis Cardinals
Defensive Rookie of the Year Jim Haslett, linebacker, Buffalo
Man of the Year Award Joe Greene, defensive tackle, Pittsburgh
Comeback Player of the Year Larry Csonka, running back, Miami
Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Terry Bradshaw, quarterback, Pittsburgh

Coaching changes

Offseason

In-season

Uniform changes

Notes

  1. ^ "Colts open Super Bowl defense". September 6, 2007. the Steelers, the only team to ever repeat twice as Super Bowl champions
  2. ^ "Steelers History: A Tradition of Excellence". Steelers.com. Archived from the original on February 18, 2010. Retrieved September 21, 2014. Yet another standard was set the following year when the 1979 Steelers defeated the Los Angeles Rams, 31-19, in Super Bowl XIV to make them ... the only team to win back-to-back Super Bowls twice
  3. ^ Rules of the Name, or How The Emmitt Rule Became The Emmitt Rule Archived September 30, 2010, at the Wayback Machine (URL last accessed March 1, 2006)

References