1994 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 3 – August 11, 1994
Number of games162 (scheduled)
112–117 (actual)[1]
Number of teams28
TV partner(s)
Draft
Top draft pickPaul Wilson
Picked byNew York Mets
Regular season
Season MVPNL: Jeff Bagwell (HOU)
AL: Frank Thomas (CHW)
MLB seasons

The 1994 Major League Baseball season began on April 3, but ended early on August 11, 1994 with the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike. The season started despite the expiration of MLB's previous collective bargaining agreement at the end of 1993. It was the first season played under the current three-division format in each league. It was also the first with an Opening Night game involving two National League teams, which did not become permanent until 1996.

Strike

Main article: 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike

As a result of a players' strike, the MLB season ended prematurely on August 11, 1994. No postseason (including the World Series) was played. Over 260 players were scheduled to exceed $1 million in compensation in 1994.[2] The Minor League Baseball season was played.

Awards and honors

Further information: 1994 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Raúl Mondesí (LA) Bob Hamelin (KC)
Cy Young Award Greg Maddux (ATL) David Cone (KC)
Manager of the Year Felipe Alou (MTL) Buck Showalter (NYY)
Most Valuable Player Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Mark Langston (CAL)
Catcher Tom Pagnozzi (STL) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman Craig Biggio (HOU) Roberto Alomar (TOR)
Third Baseman Matt Williams (SF) Wade Boggs (NYY)
Shortstop Barry Larkin (CIN) Omar Vizquel (CLE)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Kenny Lofton (CLE)
Darren Lewis (SF) Devon White (TOR)
Marquis Grissom (MTL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Mark Portugal (SF) Julio Franco (CHW)
Catcher Mike Piazza (LA) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Second Baseman Craig Biggio (HOU) Carlos Baerga (CLE)
Third Baseman Matt Williams (SF) Wade Boggs (NYY)
Shortstop Wil Cordero (MTL) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Albert Belle (CLE)
Moisés Alou (MTL) Kirby Puckett (MIN)
Tony Gwynn (SD) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Paul O'Neill NYY .359 Tony Gwynn SD .394
HR Ken Griffey, Jr. SEA 40 Matt Williams SF 43
RBI Kirby Puckett MIN 112 Jeff Bagwell HOU 116
Wins Jimmy Key NYY 17 Ken Hill MTL
Greg Maddux ATL
16
ERA Steve Ontiveros OAK 2.65 Greg Maddux ATL 1.56
SO Randy Johnson SEA 204 Andy Benes SD 189
SV Lee Smith BAL 33 John Franco NYM 30
SB Kenny Lofton CLE 60 Craig Biggio HOU 39

Standings

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
Colorado Rockies[3] 53 -20.9% 3,281,511 -26.8% 57,570 $23,887,333 130.7%
Toronto Blue Jays[4] 55 -42.1% 2,907,933 -28.3% 49,287 $43,433,668 -8.1%
Atlanta Braves[5] 68 -34.6% 2,539,240 -34.6% 46,168 $49,383,513 18.6%
Baltimore Orioles[6] 63 -25.9% 2,535,359 -30.4% 46,097 $38,849,769 33.5%
Texas Rangers[7] 52 -39.5% 2,503,198 11.5% 39,733 $32,973,597 -9.4%
Philadelphia Phillies[8] 54 -44.3% 2,290,971 -27.0% 38,183 $31,599,000 10.7%
Los Angeles Dodgers[9] 58 -28.4% 2,279,355 -28.1% 41,443 $38,000,001 -3.7%
Cleveland Indians[10] 66 -13.2% 1,995,174 -8.4% 39,121 $30,490,500 64.3%
Florida Marlins[11] 51 -20.3% 1,937,467 -36.8% 32,838 $21,633,000 11.9%
Cincinnati Reds[12] 66 -9.6% 1,897,681 -22.6% 31,628 $41,073,833 -8.5%
St. Louis Cardinals[13] 53 -39.1% 1,866,544 -34.4% 33,331 $29,275,601 25.3%
Chicago Cubs[14] 49 -41.7% 1,845,208 -30.5% 31,275 $36,287,333 -7.9%
Boston Red Sox[15] 54 -32.5% 1,775,818 -26.7% 27,747 $37,859,084 2.0%
San Francisco Giants[16] 55 -46.6% 1,704,608 -34.6% 28,410 $42,638,666 21.3%
Chicago White Sox[17] 67 -28.7% 1,697,398 -34.2% 32,026 $39,183,836 -1.3%
New York Yankees[18] 70 -20.5% 1,675,556 -30.7% 29,396 $46,040,334 7.8%
Houston Astros[19] 66 -22.4% 1,561,136 -25.1% 26,460 $33,126,000 9.7%
California Angels[20] 47 -33.8% 1,512,622 -26.5% 24,010 $25,156,218 -12.0%
Kansas City Royals[21] 64 -23.8% 1,400,494 -27.6% 23,737 $40,541,334 -2.2%
Minnesota Twins[22] 53 -25.4% 1,398,565 -31.7% 23,704 $28,438,500 0.8%
Montreal Expos[23] 74 -21.3% 1,276,250 -22.2% 24,543 $19,098,000 1.1%
Milwaukee Brewers[24] 53 -23.2% 1,268,399 -24.9% 22,650 $24,350,500 2.3%
Oakland Athletics[25] 51 -25.0% 1,242,692 -38.9% 22,191 $34,172,500 -9.6%
Pittsburgh Pirates[26] 53 -29.3% 1,222,520 -25.9% 20,041 $24,217,250 -2.4%
Detroit Tigers[27] 53 -37.6% 1,184,783 -39.9% 20,427 $41,446,501 8.6%
New York Mets[28] 55 -6.8% 1,151,471 -38.5% 21,726 $30,956,583 -20.7%
Seattle Mariners[29] 49 -40.2% 1,104,206 -46.2% 25,096 $29,228,500 -13.1%
San Diego Padres[30] 47 -23.0% 953,857 -30.7% 16,734 $14,916,333 -41.5%

Television coverage

Network Day of week Announcers
ABC Saturday nights
Monday nights
Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver
NBC Friday nights[n1 1] Bob Costas, Joe Morgan, Bob Uecker
ESPN Sunday nights
Wednesday nights
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan

Events

Movies

The following are baseball movies released in 1994:

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Due to the strike, NBC wasn't able to broadcast their slate of games for The Baseball Network, which was supposed to begin on August 26.
  1. ^ "The 1994 Season". Retrosheet. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "Baseball's millionaires". Toledo Blade. Associated Press. August 14, 1994. p. B-5.
  3. ^ "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  29. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  30. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  31. ^ "Baseball in B.C. Place: a thing of the past?". Vancouver Courier. August 18, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Box Score of Kent Mercker No Hitter Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on May 18, 2015.