1998 CIAU football season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 2, 1998 – November 7, 1998
Playoffs
Start dateNovember 7, 1998
Hardy CupSaskatchewan Huskies1998-11-14
Yates CupWestern Mustangs1998-11-14
Dunsmore CupConcordia Stingers
Loney BowlAcadia Axemen1998-11-14
Atlantic BowlConcordia Stingers1998-11-21
Churchill BowlSaskatchewan Huskies1998-11-21
Vanier Cup
DateNovember 28, 1998
SiteSkyDome, Toronto
ChampionsSaskatchewan Huskies
← 1997 CIAU football seasons 1999 →

The 1998 CIAU football season began on September 2, 1998, and concluded with the 34th Vanier Cup national championship on November 28, 1998, at the SkyDome in Toronto, Ontario, with the Saskatchewan Huskies winning the third Vanier Cup championship in program history. Twenty-four universities across Canada competed in CIAU football this season, the highest level of amateur play in Canadian football, under the auspices of the Canadian Interuniversity Athletics Union (CIAU). This year would be the last for the Carelton Ravens until their re-establishment in 2013 as the program was discontinued in 1998.[1]

Regular season

Standings

Note: GP = Games Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against, Pts = Points

Atlantic
Team GP W L PF PA Pts
Mount Allison 8 6 2 219 142 12
Acadia 8 5 3 206 168 10
Saint Mary's 8 4 4 153 161 8
StFX 8 1 7 112 219 2
Ontario-Quebec
Team GP W L PF PA Pts
Concordia 8 6 2 233 141 12
Ottawa 8 6 2 267 184 12
Laval 8 4 4 181 156 8
Bishop's 8 4 4 189 193 8
McGill 8 4 4 110 166 8
Queen's 8 3 5 208 170 6
Carleton 8 1 7 102 280 2
Ontario
Team GP W L T PF PA Pts
Western 8 8 0 0 295 139 16
Waterloo 8 7 1 0 297 150 14
Laurier 8 5 3 0 248 155 10
McMaster 8 4 4 0 278 254 8
Guelph 8 3 4 1 134 211 7
York 8 3 5 0 118 155 6
Windsor 8 1 6 1 87 275 3
Toronto 8 0 8 0 103 226 0
Canada West
Team GP W L T PF PA Pts
Saskatchewan 8 6 2 0 226 168 12
UBC 8 6 2 0 262 151 12
Calgary 8 4 4 0 261 175 8
Alberta 8 4 4 0 232 217 8
Manitoba 8 0 8 0 142 314 0

Teams in bold earned playoff berths.[2]

Post-season awards

Award-winners

[3]

All-Canadian team

Offence
First Team Second Team
Quarterback Phil Côté (Ottawa) Benoit Chapdelaine (McMaster)
Running Back Eric Lapointe (Mount Allison)
Akbal Singh (British Columbia)
Mike Bradley (Waterloo)
Gerrit Stam (Guelph)
Inside Receiver Jermayne Baldwin (St. Francis Xavier)
Chris Huismans (York)
Adrian Huntley (Manitoba)
Chris Amey (Waterloo)
Outside Receiver Rob Harrod (Ottawa)
Dan Disley (Western Ontario)
Brad Coutts (British Columbia)
Chris Evraire (Ottawa)
Centre Barkley Andersen (Calgary) Paul Sguigna (Waterloo)
Guard Sam Stetsko (Alberta)
Pascal Chéron (Laval)
Brent Weir (Acadia)
Daniel Sendecki (Waterloo)
Tackle Paul Blenkhorn (Western)
André Trudel (Laval)
Scott Flory (Saskatchewan)
Brad Chalmers (Saint Mary's)
Defence
First Team Second Team
Defensive Tackle Cameron Legault (Carleton)
James Repesse (Saskatchewan)
James Osborn (Queen's)
Jason Pudwill (Mount Allison)
Defensive End Garret Everson (Calgary)
Tyson St. James (British Columbia)
Jim Aru (Queen's)
Mike Maltar (Toronto)
Linebacker Warren Muzika (Saskatchewan)
Josh Tavares (Saint Mary's)
Dwayne Bromfield (Concordia)
Adrian Bowers (Toronto)
Daryl Tharby (Waterloo)
Dan Elliott (British Columbia)
Free Safety Chris Begley (Mount Allison) Luke Shaver (Ottawa)
Defensive Halfback Donnie Ruiz (Wilfrid Laurier)
Jean-Vincent Posy-Audette (Laval)
Dustin Edwards (Alberta)
Allan Ruby (Wilfrid Laurier)
Cornerback Pierre Landry (Ottawa)
Jason Tibbits (Waterloo)
Kevin Johnson (Wilfrid Laurier)
Chris Hoople (British Columbia)
Special Teams
First Team Second Team
Kicker Derek Livingstone (McMaster) Matt Kellett (Saskatchewan)
Punter John Baunemann (Manitoba) Michael O’Brien (Western)

[4]

Post-season

Notably this year, the Dunsmore Cup was played over two days due to an overtime game being called due to darkness.[5] The November 14 game was played at Concordia Stadium which did not have artificial lights at the time. The Rouge et Or and the Stingers had played to a 10-10 tie after two overtime periods, which ended at 4:46pm local time when nightfall had set in. Referee Ron Morin discussed with Laval's Jacques Chapdelaine and Concordia's Pat Sheahan and agreed that the game would be played on the next day, November 15. That game was played with two 10-minute halves where the Stingers won with a Jason Casey 22-yard fumble-return touchdown which sealed the 17-12 victory.[5][6]

Playoff bracket

Conference Semi-finals Conference Championships National Semi-finals 34th Vanier Cup
Laval Rouge et Or 48
Ottawa Gee-Gees 42 Laval Rouge et Or 12
Bishop's Gaiters 17 Concordia Stingers 17
Concordia Stingers 27 Concordia Stingers 25
Acadia Axemen 24
Mount Allison Mounties 28
Acadia Axemen 35
Concordia Stingers 17
Saskatchewan Huskies 24
UBC Thunderbirds 28
Saskatchewan Huskies 31
Western Ontario Mustangs 17
Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks 10 Saskatchewan Huskies 33
Waterloo Warriors 32 Waterloo Warriors 41
McMaster Marauders 32 Western Ontario Mustangs 47
Western Ontario Mustangs 34

Championships

The Vanier Cup was played between the champions of the Atlantic Bowl and the Churchill Bowl, the national semi-final games. This year, the Ontario conference's Yates Cup championship team, Western Mustangs visited the Canada West Hardy Trophy champion Saskatchewan Huskies for the Churchill Bowl. The winners of the Atlantic conference Loney Bowl championship, the Acadia Axemen, were effectively the home team for the Atlantic Bowl in Halifax, Nova Scotia which featured the Dunsmore Cup Ontario-Quebec champion Concordia Stingers.[7] The Huskies and the Stingers both won and advanced to the 34th Vanier Cup game which was played in the SkyDome in Toronto. The Concordia Stingers made their first appearance in a Vanier Cup game, which resulted in a loss to an experienced Saskatchewan Huskies team that won their second championship in three years.[8]

Notes

  1. ^ "Ravens football, 1990s". Carleton Library. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  2. ^ "CIS Football 1998". Bob Adams CIS Sports Page. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  3. ^ "Past CIS Award Winners". U Sports. Archived from the original on 2015-11-17. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  4. ^ "CIS All-Canadian Teams" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-11-02. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "CIS Football 1998". Bob Adams CIS Sports Page. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  6. ^ "Remembering the 1998 Concordia Stingers football team". theconcordian.com. November 20, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  7. ^ "Uteck Bowl History". U Sports. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  8. ^ "1998 Vanier Cup: Saskatchewan Huskies 24, Concordia Stingers 17". U Sports. November 28, 1998. Retrieved June 14, 2020.