2001 Norfolk County Council election
Flag of Norfolk.svg

← 1997 7 June 2001 2005 →

All 84 council division seats
43 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
 
Blank
Blank
Blank
Party Conservative Labour Liberal Democrats
Last election 36 seats, 35.1% 34 seats, 37.1% 13 seats, 24.4%
Seats won 48 26 10
Seat change Increase12 Decrease8 Decrease3
Popular vote 158,361 125,620 90,544
Percentage 40.2% 31.9% 23.0%
Swing Increase5.2% Decrease5.2% Decrease1.4%

Party before election

No Overall Control

Elected Party

Conservative

The Norfolk County Council election took place on 7 June 2001, coinciding with local elections for county councils in England and the 2001 general election.

The Conservatives returned to office with a majority of 12 seats, with Labour losing 8 seats and the Lib Dems losing 3, and went on to rule for three consecutive terms until narrowly losing power in 2013.

Other parties and independent candidates stood without winning seats and making little impact.

Summary of results

Norfolk County Council election results 2001[1]
Party Seats Gains Losses Net gain/loss Seats % Votes % Votes +/−
  Conservative 48 +12 57.1 40.2 158,361 +5.2
  Labour 26 -8 31.0 31.9 125,620 -5.2
  Liberal Democrats 10 -3 11.9 23.0 90,544 -1.4
  Green 0 ±0 4.2 16,457 +2.9
  Independent 0 -1 0.8 2,549 -1.5
Total 84

Election of Group Leaders

Alison King (Humbleyard) was re-elected leader of the Conservative Group,[2] Celia Cameron (St. Stephen) remained leader of the Labour Group[3] and Barbara Hacker (Thorpe Hamlet) was elected leader of the Liberal Democratic Group.[4]

Election of Leader of the Council

Alison King (Humbleyard) the leader of the Conservative group was duly elected leader of the council and formed a Conservative administration.

Results by District

Breckland

Broadland

Great Yarmouth

King's Lynn and West Norfolk

North Norfolk

Norwich

South Norfolk

References

  1. ^ Colin Rallings; Michael Thrasher. "Local Election Handbook 2001" (PDF). electionscentre.co.uk.
  2. ^ "Blairite Tory couldn't care more". The Guardian. 4 December 2002.
  3. ^ "Celia Cameron CBE". uk.linkedin.com.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Lib Dem leader at County Hall to stand down". Eastern Daily Press. 1 May 2007.