This article documents a current election. Information may change rapidly as the election progresses until official results have been published. Initial news reports may be unreliable, and the last updates to this article may not reflect the most current information. Please feel free to improve this article or discuss changes on the talk page. (November 2022) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

2022 United States elections
2020          2021          2022          2023          2024
Midterm elections
Election dayNovember 8
Incumbent presidentJoe Biden (Democratic)
Next Congress118th
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic hold
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(34 seats of Class III + special elections)
Net seat changeNone or Democratic +1
2022 United States Senate special election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Alabama2022 United States Senate election in Alaska2022 United States Senate election in Arizona2022 United States Senate election in Arkansas2022 United States Senate election in California2022 United States Senate election in Colorado2022 United States Senate election in Connecticut2022 United States Senate election in Florida2022 United States Senate election in Georgia2022 United States Senate election in Hawaii2022 United States Senate election in Idaho2022 United States Senate election in Illinois2022 United States Senate election in Indiana2022 United States Senate election in Iowa2022 United States Senate election in Kansas2022 United States Senate election in Kentucky2022 United States Senate election in Louisiana2022 United States Senate election in Maryland2022 United States Senate election in Missouri2022 United States Senate election in Nevada2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2022 United States Senate election in New York2022 United States Senate election in North Carolina2022 United States Senate election in North Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Ohio2022 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Oregon2022 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2022 United States Senate election in South Carolina2022 United States Senate election in South Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Utah2022 United States Senate election in Vermont2022 United States Senate election in Washington2022 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2022 United States Senate elections results map.svg
About this image
Map of the 2022 Senate races
     Democratic gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Pending runoff
Rectangular inset (Oklahoma): both seats were up for election
House elections
Overall controlRepublican gain
Seats contestedAll 435 voting seats
+5 of 6 non-voting seats
Popular vote marginRepublican +3.0%
Net seat changeRepublican +9
US House 2022.svg
Map of the 2022 House races
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Result unknown
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested39 (36 states, 3 territories)
Net seat changeDemocratic +2
2022 Alabama gubernatorial election2022 Alaska gubernatorial election2022 Arizona gubernatorial election2022 Arkansas gubernatorial election2022 California gubernatorial election2022 Colorado gubernatorial election2022 Connecticut gubernatorial election2022 Florida gubernatorial election2022 Georgia gubernatorial election2022 Hawaii gubernatorial election2022 Idaho gubernatorial election2022 Illinois gubernatorial election2022 Iowa gubernatorial election2022 Kansas gubernatorial election2022 Maine gubernatorial election2022 Maryland gubernatorial election2022 Massachusetts gubernatorial election2022 Michigan gubernatorial election2022 Minnesota gubernatorial election2022 Nebraska gubernatorial election2022 Nevada gubernatorial election2022 New Hampshire gubernatorial election2022 New Mexico gubernatorial election2022 New York gubernatorial election2022 Ohio gubernatorial election2022 Oklahoma gubernatorial election2022 Oregon gubernatorial election2022 Pennsylvania gubernatorial election2022 Rhode Island gubernatorial election2022 South Carolina gubernatorial election2022 South Dakota gubernatorial election2022 Tennessee gubernatorial election2022 Texas gubernatorial election2022 Vermont gubernatorial election2022 Wisconsin gubernatorial election2022 Wyoming gubernatorial election2022 Guam gubernatorial election2022 Northern Mariana Islands gubernatorial election2022 United States Virgin Islands gubernatorial election2022 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
About this image
Map of the 2022 gubernatorial elections
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Independent gain      No election

The 2022 United States elections were held on November 8, 2022, with the exception of absentee balloting. During this U.S. midterm election, which occurred during the term of incumbent president Joe Biden of the Democratic Party, all 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and 35 of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate were contested to determine the 118th United States Congress. Thirty-nine state and territorial U.S. gubernatorial elections, as well as numerous state and local elections, were also contested. This was the first election affected by the 2022 U.S. redistricting that followed the 2020 U.S. census.[1][2] The Republican Party won the House by a narrow majority and Democrats retained control of the Senate.[3][4][5]

While midterm elections typically see the incumbent president's party lose a substantial number of seats in Congress,[6][7] Democrats dramatically outperformed the historical trend,[8][9][10] a widely anticipated red wave election did not materialize,[11] and the race for control was closer than expected.[12][13][14] Republicans did well in strongholds like Florida, Tennessee, and Texas, and also saw a surge in traditionally Democratic New York, which was enough for them to flip the House with a slight majority; this was somewhat offset by a historic underperformance in critical battlegrounds, in particular in the Senate, where voters rejected Republicans that were backed by Donald Trump or that denied Trump's loss in the 2020 U.S. presidential election, defying election analysts' predictions and expectations of a more Republican-leaning national environment.[2][12]

Democrats had a net gain of two in the gubernatorial elections, flipping governorships in Arizona,[15] Maryland, and Massachusetts;[16] conversely, Republicans flipped Nevada's governorship.[17] Governor Ron DeSantis of Florida—previously considered one of the nation's most contested swing states—won reelection in an unexpectedly large landslide, leading to analysts calling him the election night's biggest winner as well as the Republican Party's only big win.[12][18][19] In the state legislative elections, Democrats flipped both chambers of the Michigan Legislature, the Minnesota Senate, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, and achieved a coalition government in the Alaska Senate. As a result of these legislative and gubernatorial results, Democrats gained government trifectas in Michigan for the first time since 1983,[20] and in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Minnesota for the first time since 2015.[21]

Six referendums to preserve or expand abortion access uniformly won,[22][23] including in the states of Kansas,[a] Kentucky, Michigan, and Montana,[24] as did those increasing the minimum wage (Nebraska, Nevada, and Washington, D.C.) and expanding Medicaid coverage (South Dakota),[2][25] while Maryland and Missouri became the latest U.S. states to legalize recreational cannabis.[26] Voters in Nevada also approved ranked voting over first-past-the-post,[27] while those in Illinois and Tennessee approved a state constitutional right to collective bargain and a right-to-work law, respectively.[28][29] All but Louisiana of the five states where it was on the ballot (Alabama, Tennessee, Oregon, and Vermont) abolished slavery as punishment for a crime.[2][30][31]

Issues that favored Democrats included, among others, significant concern over extremism and a lack of respect for democratic norms among Republicans, along with abortion rights and a potential Trump 2024 presidential campaign.[13][14][18] Raised concern over climate change and the relative popularity of Biden's climate policy also played a role.[32][33][34] Both general turnout and turnout among young voters aged 18–29, which are a strongly Democratic constituency,[35] were the second-highest (after 2018) of any midterm since 1970.[36][37] The elections continued demographic trends starting in 2012, in which Republicans made gains among the working class, especially whites but since 2016 also some minorities like Hispanics,[38] while Democrats continued to improve among affluent and college-educated whites.[12]

Background

Further information: 2020 United States elections and 2021 United States elections

See also: 117th United States Congress § Major legislation, and 117th United States Congress § Proposed (but not enacted)

After the 2020 elections, Democrats had a government trifecta at the federal level for the first time since the 111th United States Congress in 2011. This gave them a relatively straightforward path to enacting legislation, but the presence of more centrist or conservative Democrats, namely Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema,[39] meant that most of the more expansive and often more progressive legislation was blocked.[40][41][42] In the White House, Joe Biden started his term out with positive approval ratings,[43] but as the year progressed with the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant and the Fall of Kabul,[44] and as key legislation stalled,[45][46] Biden and Democrats lost popularity and suffered electoral losses,[47][48][49] including an upset loss in the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election,[50] which were widely characterized as a red wave election and as a prelude to the 2022 midterms.[51][52] In addition, the incumbent president almost always lose seats in Congress and often at least one chamber or overall control, in particular since the post-war period.[53][54]

Going into 2022, Republicans capitalized on high inflation,[55][56] crime,[57][58][59] and gas prices,[60][61] and gained a substantial lead in the election climate towards 2022 results similar to the red wave of 2010.[62] The repeal of Roe v. Wade by the Supreme Court of the United States in the June 2022 Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization decision led to a spike in Democratic voters' fervor, which narrowed the gap, amid better-than-expected election results during this period;[63] this led some observers to wonder whether the 2022 midterms could break the incumbent president's losses and reflect the 1998 U.S. elections, as well as the 2002 U.S. elections, both of which showed increased support for the incumbent president, amid the impeachment of Bill Clinton (1998) and the aftermath of the September 11 attacks (2002).[64] By October, Republicans regained a substantial margin in pre-election polls,[65] which led to widespread predictions for a red wave election in favor of Republicans,[8][9][10] though polls remained within the margin of error.[66]

Campaign

Primaries

After suffering losses in 2021,[67][68][69] progressives within the Democratic Party saw improved but mixed results in 2022, with both progressives and moderates winning important races.[70][71][72] In 2022, Democratic campaign arms aided radical-right candidates in Republican primary elections, believing they would be easier opponents in the general election.[73][74] Republican primary candidates who had been endorsed by former president Donald Trump tended to win,[75] with his support being crucial for many,[76][77] though his percentage was lower than in previous years, largely due to him taking riskier endorsements.[78][79] Generally, candidates that received Trump's endorsements were on the far right and those who supported his false claims that there was widespread fraud in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.[80][81] Trump issued primary endorsements to 37 candidates who ran in the general elections in November that were rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report with Amy Walter.[82]

Issues

Economy

See also: 2021–2022 inflation surge

Voters suffered from historically high consumer prices,[83][84][85] gas prices,[86][87] and interest rates,[88][89] which Republicans blamed on Biden's and Democratic policies,[90][91][92] as well as government spending;[93] Democrats argued that it was linked to the global surge of inflation, the COVID-19 pandemic-related supply chain issues, and the war in Ukraine.[93]

The economy, inflation in particular,[85][94] remained the top issue for voters throughout 2022.[95][96][97] According to an October 2022 Monmouth University poll, 82 percent of Americans considered inflation to be an "extremely or very essential issue" for the government to handle, and seven in ten Americans disapproved of Biden's handling of the cost of living rise.[87] It is not clear whether there is a correlation between rise of inflation, particularly the rise of gas prices,[98][99] and lower presidential approval ratings,[100] which can cause negative election results; some studies suggest that historically it can hurt the incumbent president in terms of election results,[83] but that this got weaker in recent years.[101][102]

Abortion

See also: Abortion in the United States

Following the ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that overturned Roe v. Wade in June 2022,[103] Democrats outperformed Biden's results in the 2020 U.S. presidential election in several House special elections, with abortion cited as a major contributor to their victories,[104] as many Republican-controlled states passed restrictive abortion laws, including a total or near-total ban on the procedure.[93] Democrats tried to pass a federal law to protect the right to abortion but did not have enough support in the Senate, and abortion was prioritized as an issue for the general elections.[93][105]

The Dobbs ruling made abortion more important for voters,[91] with a rise in support among women for the Democratic Party coming after the decision,[106] and at least six states had an abortion-related ballot initiative, the most ever in a single year.[107] Additionally, Republicans suffered from internal division on the issue. Lindsey Graham, who was not up for reelection in 2022, introduced a federal bill to ban abortions after 15 weeks; most Republicans argued that abortion regulations should be left to the states,[93] and Graham's proposal received a mixed response among Republicans.[108] Despite controlling the state legislature, an anti-abortion law failed to pass in South Carolina because Republicans could not agree on how restrictive it should be.[109]

Crime and gun violence

See also: Crime in the United States, Gun violence in the United States, and List of mass shootings in the United States in 2022

Mass shootings made gun violence and crime more important issues for voters,[110][111][112] in particular after the Robb Elementary School shooting in May 2022,[59] which is common in the aftermath of school shootings.[113][114] The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, which passed in June 2022, provided extended gun-safety laws and was touted by Biden and Democrats.[115] Despite this, Republicans maintained a lead among voters who cited crime as a major issue.[116][117]

Republicans blamed the increase in violent crime and homicides in 2020 and 2021 on progressives and liberals, as well as attempts to "defund the police",[118] a slogan supported by racial justice protesters but eventually rejected by Biden.[93] In a June 2022 Supreme Court decision, the Roberts Court further expanded the right to keep and bear arms in the United States.[119] Democrats pushed for stricter gun laws, including a ban on assault weapons, while Republicans sought to protect legal access to guns and the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.[93]

Democracy

See also: Democratic backsliding in the United States and Republican efforts to restrict voting following the 2020 presidential election

Democrats campaigned on strengthening democratic institutions,[120] having said that Trumpist supporters grew increasingly authoritarian or "semi-fascist",[121][122][123] as Biden had called them in August and September 2022,[124][125][126] since Trump and many Republicans continue to contest the results of the 2020 presidential election;[93] as recently as September 2022, Trump said he should be reinstated as president.[93] Democrats also argued that Republicans regaining power would harm U.S. governance,[127] citing the many Republican candidates who denied the results of the 2020 U.S. presidential election,[93] which news outlets tracked. As of July 2022, at least 120 Republican candidates were 2020 election deniers, a majority of whom ran for the House.[128]

During the party primaries, Republican candidates alleged fraud irrespective of the results; among those who did so and later won the party nomination, Kari Lake said: "We out-voted the fraud."[129] During the general election campaign, Lake refused to say that she would accept the result if she does not win the election,[2] stating that she was "going to win the election, and I will accept that result."[130] Additionally, Republican-controlled states passed laws restricting voting rights or making it harder to vote, which particularly affects minority voters and critics say also reflects a legacy of racial disenfranchisement.[131] In November 2022, Biden said that democracy was on the ballot and cited the attack on Paul Pelosi, husband of the Democratic House leader Nancy Pelosi, stating that Trump's false claims about a stolen election in 2020 had "fuelled the dangerous rise of political violence and voter intimidation over the past two years".[132]

The Democratic Party filed lawsuits to remove Green Party candidates from the ballot, most notably the North Carolina Green Party candidate Matthew Hoh in the 2022 United States Senate election in North Carolina,[133][134][135] citing an ongoing investigation into the party for fraudulant signatures.[136] Their warning that the Greens could divide progressive voters and give Republicans wins in tight races nonetheless received widespread criticism,[137] and Hoh appeared on the ballot.[138]

Education

See also: Anti-gender movement, Critical race theory, and Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on education

Republicans argued for parents having more control over what their children are taught in schools,[93] being concerned in particular by discussions on topics such as race,[139] gender identity, and sexuality.[140] Democrats dismissed these concerns as a push for censorship, saying that it would especially harm LGBT students.[93] This came amid increased efforts among Republicans to ban books that discuss those topics, particularly in Republican-controlled states like Florida.[141]

Twenty Republican candidates promulgated the litter boxes in schools hoax, which emerged largely as backlash against recognition of gender variance in schools.[142][143] House minority leader Kevin McCarthy vowed to "recover lost learning from school closures" during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.[93]

Climate change

See also: Climate change in the United States and Environmental policy of the Joe Biden administration

In this election, climate change was a significant issue.[144][145] 71% of voters considered climate change as a serious problem,[34] even though there were differences in the level of concern. One poll showed that for 51% of voters climate change was one of the more important issues.[146] According to another poll, 64% of people of color were more likely to vote for a candidate that is addressing climate change as one of the three most important points in their agenda.[147] A third poll showed that 9% of voters considered climate change as the most important issue.[148]

Progressive Democrats pushed for legislation to combat the negative effects of climate change, including incentives towards the adoption of renewable energy and electric cars.[93] In August 2022, Biden signed into law the Inflation Reduction Act, which also included climate change-related policies to address it,[149] and has been described as the first major or significant climate change law,[150][151] as well as the largest investment to fight climate change in U.S. history.[152]

Immigration

See also: Immigration policy of the Joe Biden administration and Martha's Vineyard migrant crisis

Immigration is among the issues where the United States is divided the most.[153] Biden revoked some of Trump's anti-immigration policies but not others,[93] and Republicans pledged to continue Trump's hardline policies.[154][155] An increase of over 385% in border encounters from 2020 to 2022 gave Republicans an edge over Democrats, as Republicans blamed it on Biden and Democrats,[93] and polling showed that voters moderately preferred Republicans over Democrats for solving immigration problems.[156][157][158]

In a September 2022 political stunt, Florida governor Ron DeSantis had migrants sent to Martha's Vineyard.[159][160][161] This was also done by Republican governors in Arizona and Texas who sent migrants to northerner, more liberal states,[162] which was criticized by Biden, Democrats, and migrant rights groups as a "cruel political theatre".[93]

Student loan forgiveness

See also: Student loans in the United States

Since Biden revealed a plan for student loan forgiveness in August 2022 through an executive order based upon the Higher Education Relief Opportunities For Students Act of 2003,[163][164] both parties sought electoral gains from the decision, with Democrats potentially attracting young voters who would benefit from the program, and Republicans targeting blue-collar workers who likely did not go to college and would be unwilling to help subsidize the education debts of others.[165] A majority of voters were found to support student loan forgiveness in the run-up to the election.[166][167]

During the election campaign, conservatives and Republicans attempted to find plaintliffs,[168] as part of an effort to sue the Biden administration over the proposal, and take the case to the Supreme Court;[169][170] this temporarily blocked the plan, which included cancelling up to $10,000 of student debt for those making less than $125,000 a year and up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients,[171][172] as the courts will have to consider legal challanges.[173][174][175] In November 2022, a federal judge in Texas stuck down Biden's student loan plan.[176] In response, Biden extended a moratorium on the plan from January 2023 to June 2023.[177]

Presidency of Joe Biden

See also: 2022 opinion polling on the Joe Biden administration and Opinion polling on the Joe Biden administration

Republicans were benefiting from Biden's low U.S. presidential approval ratings,[91] hovering from 30–40% for much of the year.[178][179] His ratings briefly increased after several legislative victories in August and September 2022;[180][181][182] by October, they again plateaued when voters focused back on the state of the economy.[183][184]

Russian invasion of Ukraine

See also: Cyberwarfare by Russia

The Russian invasion of Ukraine was the major foreign policy issue,[185][186][187] shifting support for Biden and highlighting the Republican Party's perceived support for Russia and Vladimir Putin.[188][189][190] One day before election day, Russian entrepreneur Yevgeny Prigozhin, who was in the center of accusations of hidden propaganda activities by the Russian government, in regard to Russian interference in U.S. elections, wrote on Vkontakte: "We have interfered, we are interfering and we will continue to interfere."[191]

Campaign spending

With a total of almost 17 billion U.S. dollars in expenditure, the election campaigns for the 2022 midterm elections were the most expensive in the history of the United States.[192]

Federal elections

Senate elections

Control of Senate seats by class after the 2022 elections
Class Democratic Independent Republican TBD Next elections
1 21 2 10 0 2024
2 13 0 20 0 2026
3 14 0 19 1[b] 2028
Total 48 2[c] 49 1

Main article: 2022 United States Senate elections

Thirty-five of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate were up for election, including all 34 Class 3 Senator seats. Concurrent with the regularly scheduled Class 3 elections, a special election was held to fill a Class 2 vacancy in Oklahoma. As senators serve six-year terms, the last regularly scheduled elections for Class 3 senators were held in 2016. The winners of the Senate elections will be sworn in on January 3, 2023, for the 118th U.S. Congress. Going into the election, Democrats and Republicans both held 50 seats,[c] but Democrats had a majority due to their control of the vice presidency, which has the power to break ties in the Senate.[2] In the Senate elections, Republicans defended 21 seats, including six seats left open by retirements. Democrats defended fourteen seats, one of which was an open seat.[193]

Voters at a polling location in Londonderry, New Hampshire. The 2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire was tightly contested.
Voters at a polling location in Londonderry, New Hampshire. The 2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire was tightly contested.

This was the third consecutive midterm election in the incumbent president's first term in which the party not occupying the White House was able to win control of the House but was unable to win the Senate. Democrats performed better than expected in New Hampshire,[2] Pennsylvania, where they gained a seat (the sole flipping seat), and Nevada,[194][195] which allowed them to retain control of the Senate, with the possibility of an increased majority if they win the runoff election in Georgia on December 6, 2022.[2][196]

Special elections

Two special elections took place in 2022 to replace senators who resigned during the 117th U.S. Congress:[197]

House of Representatives elections

Main article: 2022 United States House of Representatives elections

All 435 voting seats in the U.S. House of Representatives were up for election. Forty-nine representatives and one non-voting delegate (30 Democrats, 20 Republicans) did not seek re-election, and three seats were vacant at the time of the election. The incumbents in the 2022 elections were determined in the 2020 U.S. House of Representatives elections and subsequent special elections. These elections were the first conducted after the 2020 U.S. redistricting cycle, causing several districts to lack an incumbent or have multiple incumbents. Democrats held a 220–212 majority at the time of the election.[206] The race was competitive and closer than expected,[2] with Republicans projected to gain control of the chamber a week later with a slim majority,[5] 220 to 213.[207]

Special elections

Nine special elections were held in 2022:[208]

State elections

Partisan control of state governments following the 2022 elections:.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Democratic trifecta maintained  Republican trifecta maintained  Democratic trifecta established  Divided government established  Divided government maintained  Officially non-partisan, unicameral legislature
Partisan control of state governments following the 2022 elections:
  Democratic trifecta maintained
  Republican trifecta maintained
  Democratic trifecta established
  Divided government established
  Divided government maintained
  Officially non-partisan, unicameral legislature

Gubernatorial elections

Main article: 2022 United States gubernatorial elections

Elections were held for the governorships of 36 U.S. states and three insular areas. As most governors serve four-year terms, the last regularly scheduled elections for most seats up for election in 2022 were held in 2018. The governors of New Hampshire and Vermont each serve two-year terms, so incumbents in these two states were determined in 2020. Prior to the election, Republicans held a total of 28 seats, 20 of which were up for election in 2022, and Democrats held 22 seats, 16 of which were up for election.[223] Democrats picked up the seats of retiring and term-limited Republican incumbents in Arizona,[15] Maryland, and Massachusetts.[16]

Democratic incumbents won high-profile contests in Michigan and Wisconsin, while Democrat Josh Shapiro's defeat of Republican Doug Mastriano allowed Democrats to retain control of Pennsylvania's gubernatorial office.[224] A Democratic incumbent also prevailed in a closely contested race in Kansas,[225] while the party held onto Oregon in another closely contested race.[226] She is set to be one of the first lesbian governors in the United States,[227] along with Maura Healey in Massachusetts.[2][16] Meanwhile, Republican incumbents won reelection in major races in Florida, Georgia, and Texas,[16] held onto Arkansas,[224] and Mike Dunleavy won reelection to a second term, becoming the first Republican governor of Alaska to be reelected to a second term since Jay Hammond in 1978 and the first governor, regardless of political affiliation, to be reelected to a second term since Tony Knowles in 1998.[228] Democrats made a further gain in Arizona,[15] which set the record for most female governors in U.S. history.[229][230] The sole gain for Republicans was in Nevada,[17] where Joe Lombardo narrowly defeated the incumbent Democratic governor Steve Sisolak.[231][232]

Other state executive elections

See also: List of U.S. statewide elected officials and State constitutional officer

Further information: 2022 United States attorney general elections, 2022 United States secretary of state elections, and 2022 United States treasurer elections

Results from 2022 U.S. attorney general elections     Democratic gain       Republican gain     Democratic hold       Republican hold      Nonpartisan       Results unknown       No election
Results from 2022 U.S. attorney general elections
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Nonpartisan      Results unknown      No election

Various state-wide executive positions across several states held elections in 2022. State attorneys general were elected in thirty U.S. states, three territories, and one federal district. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018.[233] The attorney general of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.[234] While Democrats flipped Vermont and Charity Clark became the state's first female attorney general,[235][236] one notable Republican upset was Brenna Bird's narrow win over Tom Miller,[237] the incumbent Democratic attorney general of Iowa and the longest-serving state attorney general in U.S. history.[2][238]

Secretaries of state were elected in twenty-seven U.S. states. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018.[239] The secretary of state of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.[240] State treasurers and equivalents were elected in twenty-seven U.S. states, plus a special election in Utah. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018.[241] The treasurer of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.[242]

State judicial elections

See also: State court (United States)

Numerous states held judicial elections in 2022.[243] Republicans gained a majority on the North Carolina Supreme Court by picking up two seats, raising the possibility of mid-decade redistricting. In another election with major redistricting implications, Republicans retained a majority on the Supreme Court of Ohio.[244][245][246]

Legislative elections

Main article: 2022 United States state legislative elections

In 2022, 46 states held regularly scheduled elections in 88 legislative chambers, although not all seats were up in the legislatures holding elections, as some states use staggered terms. Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia did not hold regularly scheduled state legislative elections, as those states all hold such elections in odd-numbered years. The District of Columbia and the U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands also held legislative elections in 2022. As in the U.S. House of Representatives, these elections were the first conducted after the 2020 U.S. census and the 2022 U.S. redistricting. Prior to the election, Republicans controlled 60 legislative chambers, Democrats controlled 37 chambers, and a cross-party coalition controlled the Alaska House of Representatives.[d][247][248]

Democrats successfully defended every legislative chamber they had held prior to the election, the first time the president's party accomplished this feat in a midterm since the 1934 U.S. elections.[249] Democrats picked up the Pennsylvania House of Representatives,[250] the Minnesota Senate, both state legislative chambers in Michigan,[251] and also established a cross-party coalition in the Alaska Senate.[252] Democrats had not controlled the Michigan Senate since 1984,[253] one reason being that although Democrats won the popular several times, Republicans continued to win more seats due to a more favorable map, which was redrawn by an independent commission in 2018 following a successful ballot measure.[20] As a result of victories in state legislative and gubernatorial elections, Democrats gained government trifectas in Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Minnesota.[249] In addition, Republicans lost a trifecta in Arizona, which they held since 2009,[254] while Democrats lost a trifecta in Nevada. Following the election, although Republicans held trifectas in more states, more people lived in Democratic-controlled states than in Republican-controlled states.[255]

Though Republican governor Phil Scott won reelection, Democrats gained a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers of the Vermont General Assembly.[249] Republicans gained supermajorities in the Wisconsin Senate, the North Carolina Senate, the South Carolina House of Representatives, and both chambers of the Florida Legislature.[256] At the same time, the Republican Party fell short of attaining a supermajority in the Wisconsin State Assembly and the North Carolina House of Representatives,[257] meaning that Democratic governors in both states will retain the ability to veto legislation that is passed without Democratic support.[258][259]

Referendums

Main article: 2022 United States ballot measures

Further information: Labor unions in the United States, Legalization of non-medical cannabis in the United States, and Minimum wage in the United States

See also: 2022 California Proposition 1, 2022 Kansas Value Them Both Amendment, 2022 Michigan Proposal 3, and 2022 Tennessee Amendment 1

Of the many proposed for 2022,[260] 132 ballot measures were certified in 37 states.[261] In response to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that held there was no constitutional right to abortion in the United States and gave individual states the full power to regulate any aspect of abortion, six states had an abortion‑related ballot measure: California, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, and Vermont.[107] During the August primaries, 59% of Kansas voters rejected their state's Value Them Both Amendment, which would have removed the right to an abortion from the Kansas Constitution.[262] California voters considered Proposition 1 during the general election,[263][264] which was approved,[28] and amended the Constitution of California to explicitly grant the right to an abortion and contraceptives.[2] All other abortion-related ballot measures also passed.[265]

In Nebraska, Nevada, and Washington, D.C., voters approved to increase the minimum wage,[2] which was in line with most such measures being approved regardless of U.S. state partisanship;[25] Republicans had pushed for ballot measures to be made harder to be certified or approved,[266] one such attempt (requiring 60 percent for any ballot measure to pass) failed in Arkansas.[28] Among electoral reform ballot measures,[267][268] voters in Nevada also approved to replace the traditional primary system and first-past-the-post voting with top-five ranked-choice voting statewide,[27] though they will need to confirm the measure in 2024 for it to take effect by 2026, as it would change the state constitution;[269] unlike the other ballot measues, this was opposed by both Democrats and Republicans.[270][271][272] In Arizona, voters approved a ballot measure that limited medical debt interest rates.[25] In South Dakota, voters approved to expand Medicaid coverage as part of the Affordable Care Act.[2][273] In Tennessee, voters voted on Amendment 1,[274] which would amend the Constitution of Tennessee to make it illegal for workplaces to require employees to be members of labor unions as a condition for employment;[2] voters in Tennessee approved for the state to have a right-to-work law,[28] while those in Illinois approved for a state constitutional right to collective bargaining.[29]

In five states, voters were asked to make the possession and use of marijuana legal for people 21 and older.[275] In Maryland and Missouri, the measures were approved,[26] while voters in Arkansas, as well as in North and South Dakota, rejected legalization. In Colorado, voters approved the decriminalization and regulation of certain psychedelic plants and fungi.[2] Of the five states where it was on the ballot,[276] Alabama, Tennessee, Oregon, and Vermont abolished slavery in prisons;[25] it did not pass in Louisiana.[2][30][31]

Local elections

Mayoral elections

A number of major U.S. cities have held mayoral elections in 2022.[277]

Eligible

Ineligible or retiring

County elections

Tribal elections

See also: Native Americans in the United States and Native American reservation politics

Several notable Native American tribes are holding elections for tribal executive positions during 2022. The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Tribes of Alaska reelected tribal president Chalyee Éesh Richard Peterson to a fifth term;[332] Lynn "Nay" Valbuena was also elected to serve a fifth term as chair of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.[333] Terry Rambler won election to a fourth consecutive term as chair of the San Carlos Apache Tribe.[334] Osage Nation principal chief Geoffrey Standing Bear,[335] tribal council chief Beverly Kiohawiton Cook of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe,[336] Mark Fox of the Three Affiliated Tribes,[337] and Jamie Azure of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians,[338] as well as Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head Chairperson Cheryl Andrews-Maltais,[339] were all reelected to third terms. Chairman Marshalle Pierite of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe,[340] the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma chief Craig Harper,[341] as well as Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation tribal chairman Joseph Rupnik,[342] were all reelected to a second term. Also reelected were Salt River Pima–Maricopa Indian Community president Martin Harvier and Quapaw Nation chairman Joseph Byrd.[333][343] Bill Sterud was reelected as chair of the Puyallup Tribe; he first joined the Puyallup Tribal Council in 1978.[344]

Brad KillsCrow was elected to his first full term as chief of the Delaware Tribe of Indians.[345] Reid D. Milanovich was elected chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, replacing the retiring Jeff Grubbe.[346] Clayton Dumont Jr. won an open seat to become chairman of the Klamath Tribes,[347] Arden L. Kucate was elected governor of the Pueblo of Zuni,[333] and Kimberly Jenkins was elected chair of the Kaw Nation.[348] In the Wabanaki Confederacy, the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Motahkmikuk reelected William Nicholas to a fourth term as chief, chief Kirk Francis was elected to serve a sixth term as head of the Penobscot Nation, and tribal representative Rena Newell was elected chief of the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Sipayik, ousting chief Maggie Dana.[349][350]

Several tribal leaders were defeated when seeking reelection. Buu Nygren defeated Jonathan Nez to become president of the Navajo Nation; Nygren's running mate, Richelle Montoya, is the first woman elected as Navajo Nation vice president.[351] Lora Ann Chaisson defeated August "Cocoa" Creppel in the election for principal chief of the United Houma Nation.[352] Kasey Velasquez defeated chairwoman Gwendena Lee-Gatwood to become the second woman elected to lead the White Mountain Apache Tribe.[353] RoseMary LaClair defeated incumbent Nooksack Indian Tribe chairman Roswell Cline Sr.[354] Former Red Lake Band of Chippewa chairman Floyd "Buck" Jourdain defeated incumbent chairman Darrell Seki Sr.[355] Ryman LeBeau defeated incumbent Harold Fraizer to become chairman-at-large of the Cheyenne River Sioux.[356]

Table of state, territorial, and federal results

See also: Political party strength in U.S. states

This table shows the partisan results of president, congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2022. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and Senate elections in 2022. The five U.S. territories and Washington, D.C., do not elect members of the Senate, and the territories do not take part in presidential elections; instead, they each elect one of the six non-voting members of the U.S. House of Representatives. The unicameral Nebraska Legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are elected on a non-partisan basis, and political party affiliation is not listed.[212]

State/Territory 2022
PVI[212]
Before 2022 elections After 2022 elections
Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Alabama R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
Alaska R+8 Rep Split[g] Rep Dem 1–0 Rep Rep Dem 1–0
Arizona R+2 Rep Rep Dem Dem 5–4 Dem Rep Dem Rep 6–3
Arkansas R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
California D+13 Dem Dem Dem Dem 42–11 Dem Dem Dem Dem 40–12
Colorado D+4 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–3
Connecticut D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0
Delaware D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0
Florida R+3 Rep Rep Rep Rep 16–11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 20–8
Georgia R+3 Rep Rep Dem Rep 8–6 Rep Rep Runoff Rep 9–5
Hawaii D+14 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
Idaho R+18 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0
Illinois D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 14–3
Indiana R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Iowa R+6 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
Kansas R+10 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kentucky R+16 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Louisiana R+12 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Maine D+2 Dem Dem Split R/I[h] Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Split R/I[h] Dem 2–0
Maryland D+14 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–1
Massachusetts D+15 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 9–0
Michigan R+1 Dem Rep Dem Split 7–7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–6
Minnesota D+1 Dem Split Dem Split 4–4 Dem Dem Dem Split 4–4
Mississippi R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Missouri R+10 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2
Montana R+11 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Split Rep 2–0
Nebraska R+13 Rep NP[i] Rep Rep 3–0 Rep NP[i] Rep Rep 3–0
Nevada R+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1 Rep Dem Dem Dem 3–1
New Hampshire D+1 Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0 Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2 Dem Dem Dem Dem 9–3
New Mexico D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–0
New York D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 19–8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 15–11
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 8–5 Dem Rep Rep Split 7–7
North Dakota R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Ohio R+6 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4 Rep Rep Split Rep 10–5
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0
Oregon D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–2
Pennsylvania R+2 Dem Rep Split Split 9–9 Dem Split Dem Dem 9–8
Rhode Island D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
South Dakota R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 8–1
Texas R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 24–12 Rep Rep Rep Rep 25–13
Utah R+13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
Vermont D+16 Rep Dem Split D/I[j] Dem 1–0 Rep Dem Split D/I[j] Dem 1–0
Virginia D+3 Rep Split Dem Dem 7–4 Rep Split Dem Dem 6–5
Washington D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 8–2
West Virginia R+22 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0 Rep Rep Split Rep 2–0
Wisconsin R+2 Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3 Dem Rep Split Rep 6–2
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
United States Even Rep 28–22 Rep 29–17–3[g] Dem 50–50 Dem 220–212 Rep 26–24 Rep 27–19–3 Dem 50–49 Rep 222–213
Washington, D.C. D+43 Dem[k] Dem[k] Dem Dem[k] Dem[k] Dem
American Samoa NP/D[l] NP Rep NP/D[l] NP Rep
Guam Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Rep
N. Mariana Islands Rep Split[m] Dem[n] Ind Ind/Dem[o] Dem
Puerto Rico PNP/D[p] PDP PNP/R[q] PNP/D[p] PDP PNP/R[q]
U.S. Virgin Islands Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
State/Territory PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Before 2022 elections After 2022 elections

Aftermath

Results

The race for Congress was much closer than expected;[358][359][360] control of Congress remained uncertain for several days,[361] and the House remained too close to call for over a week,[5] which was not thought to be likely in a national environment favorable to the Republican Party.[2] Organizations that make election calls projected on November 12 that the Democratic Party retained control of the Senate,[3][4] while later projecting on November 15–16 that Republicans gained control over the House with a slim majority.[5][362][363] Abortion and the economy were major issues,[364] and young and independent voters, the latter of which Democrats narrowly won whilst keeping enough of their key voting blocs and could explain their key wins,[365] turned out in record numbers particularly in some key swing states, which were won by Democrats; it is not agreed among experts only to what extent and by how much the youth vote helped Democrats.[366] It was the first midterm election since 1986 in which the party of the incumbent president achieved a net gain in governorships, and the first since 1934 in which the president's party did not lose any state legislative chambers.[367]

Democrats lost fewer seats than expected and fewer than the average for the president's party since the 1950s in the House, and made gains in the Senate, even though the president's party usually lose many seats in the midterm elections;[6][7] it was the best performance for the president's party in a midterm election in two decades in terms of seat losses,[7] and historically good when considering Biden's underwater approval ratings.[368] In addition, Democrats gained a Senate seat in Pennsylvania where John Fetterman defeated Mehmet Oz,[369] winning the seat of retiring Republican Senator Pat Toomey,[370][371] while Georgia will hold a runoff election after no candidate won a majority of the vote.[372][373] Many factors have been attributed to the lack of a red wave and better-than-expected perfomance for Democrats,[2][374][375] including the quality of candidates,[376] as well as youth turnout.[11][35] Incumbent president Joe Biden, a Democrat, and incumbent Florida governor Ron DeSantis of the Republican Party, as well as reproductive rights, have been widely considered as the biggest winners,[377] while former president Donald Trump was considered to be the biggest loser by the election results.[369][378][379] Sean Patrick Maloney, the chair of the Democratic House coalition's fundraising arm, lost his reelection bid after ten years in Congress.[377]

Democrats made gains at the gubernational level. In the 2022 Maryland gubernatorial election, Wes Moore, a Democrat, became the state's first African-American governor, while the 2022 Massachusetts gubernatorial election and 2022 Oregon gubernatorial election resulted in Maura Healey and Tina Kotek, both Democrats, becoming the first open lesbian governors in U.S. history.[2][16][380] Gretchen Whitmer, the incumbent Democrat, won the 2022 Michigan gubernatorial election. On the Republican side, incumbent governors performed well. Greg Abbott won the 2022 Texas gubernatorial election, while Brian Kemp won the 2022 Georgia gubernatorial election; in both cases, they defeated the Democratic opponents, Beto O'Rourke and Stacey Abrams, who had lost by narrower margins in 2018.[2][16][379] In the 2022 Florida gubernatorial election, DeSantis won in a landside,[12][18][19] challenging the state's battleground status;[381] results showed that he performed better than other Republicans among Hispanics,[382] who got mixed results.[383] Both parties elected female governors, resulting in the most female governors in U.S. history.[384] Incumbent Laura Kelly of the Democratic Party narrowly won the 2022 Kansas gubernatorial election,[225] while Sarah Huckabee Sanders of the Republican Party won the 2022 Arkansas gubernatorial election.[2][224] Democrats also won the 2022 Arizona gubernatorial election, an office that was previously held by a term-limited Republican, as Katie Hobbs won over Kari Lake.[385] Despite losses, Republicans flipped a governorship from Democrats by winning the 2022 Nevada gubernatorial election, in which Joe Lombardo defeated the incumbent Steve Sisolak,[2] and in the 2022 Alaska gubernatorial election a Republican governor was reelected to a second term for the first time since 1998.[228]

In state legislative elections, Democrats gained full control of government in Minnesota and made gains in Pennsylvania,[21] where a more neutral, independent redrawn map (like in Michigan) gave them a shot to regain control of the state legislatrure.[257] In one of the most historic results of the night, Democrats gained a trifecta in Michigan for the first time since 1983.[386] For over a week, control of the state legislatures of Alaska,[387] Arizona, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania was not determined.[253] In Alaska, Democrats established a cross-coalition majority with moderate Republicans, which they already had in the House before the election, in the Senate, where they were previously a minority.[388] In New Hampshire, where Democrats made gains,[389] the race for the House was so close that a series of recounts and legal challenges have followed, leaving the state of the race uncertain.[390][391] In Pennsylvania, Republicans retained control of the Senate but the House was too close;[392] by November 16, Democrats regained control of the House for the first time since 2010.[393][394] Referendums to preserve or expand abortion access won in all six states where they were on the ballot (California, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, and Vermont).[22][23][24] Those related to increasing the minimum wage (Nebraska, Nevada, and Washington, D.C.) and expanding Medicaid coverage (South Dakota) also passed,[25] while those related to cannabis legalization, some of which for medical uses and some for recreational usage, achieved mixed results.[2][26] Nevada also approved state ranked-choice voting election reform.[27] Those related to the abolition of penal labor in the United States also generally passed at the state level (Alabama, Tennessee, Oregon, and Vermont),[30] with the exception of Louisiana.[31]

Reactions

Biden described the results as a "strong night" for Democrats,[9] and he urged for cooperation in Congress.[395] Senator Lindsey Graham commented: "It's certainly not a red wave, that's for darn sure. But it is clear that we will take back the House."[396] On November 9, when the results for the House were still uncertain, the Republican House leader Kevin McCarthy launched his bid to succeed long-time House Democrats leader Nancy Pelosi as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. In a letter asking for support among Republicans, he wrote: "I trust you know that earning the majority is only the beginning. Now, we will be measured by what we do with our majority. Now the real work begins."[395] On November 17, after Republicans were projected to win back the House, Pelosi announched that she would not seek reelection as speaker.[397]

Analysis

Polls both prior to and after the elections found that the status of the economy and inflation was the most important issue for voters,[55][398] with concern about abortion being relatively low compared to them,[11] and it was widely expected that this would benefit Republicans and potentially produce a red wave election in their favor,[8][9][10] which did not happen;[2][399] Florida and New York were the exception to this national trend.[400][401][402] The lack of a red wave election was attributed in part to issues that favored Democrats,[8][9][10] including significant concern over extremism among Republicans and the democratic backsliding in the United States that worsened since Trump won in 2016, abortion rights and the status of abortion in the United States since June 2022 after Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization overturned the long-held precedent since 1972 of Roe v. Wade that gave a constitutional right to abortion,[2][11][12] and the imminent announcement of the Trump campaign for the 2024 U.S. presidential election.[13][14][403] Increasing concerns over climate change and the higher approval of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 compared to the previous climate policy also played a role in it,[32][33][34] as did turnout. Whether youth turnout in particular helped to explain the results was also debated.[11]

The elections reflected trends that approximately started in 2012, in which the white American working-class, and since 2016 also some minorities, in particular those who are working class or Hispanic and Latino Americans,[38] moved even more towards Republicans,[404] though not to the extent Republicans expected,[383] as Democrats continued to win a majority of Latino voters;[381] at the same time, affluent and college-educated whites continued to move towards Democrats.[12][381] Democrats performed better than expected in states like New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, and performed well in Colorado and New England, while Republicans made gains in Florida and New York. Redistricting and gerrymandering also affected results; in New York, where Democrats suffered major losses, a gerrymander had been rejected by the courts, while gerrymanders in Florida and Tennessee gave Republicans more seats by virtue of the redistricted map being much more Republican-leaning.[2]

Close results

While it is normal to take several days to know the results, including blue shifts and red mirages as Democrats vote by mail more often than Republicans,[405] the fact the race for Congress was competitive, and also closer than expected,[2][406] resulted in control of the House being uncalled for over a week,[5] with the outcome of several races in western states uncertain;[407][408][409] the Senate also remained too close to call.[398][399] By November 11, control of the Senate remained too close to call but with Democrats slightly favored,[2][410] as they made a gain in Pennsylvania's open race,[369] where John Fetterman defeated Mehmet Oz in an upset,[411] while three races remained uncalled, all of which are Democratic-held;[2] races had not yet been called in Arizona and Nevada.[2] Democrats had to win two of these three races to maintain control of the Senate,[412] and will have to defend their net gain in the Georgia competitive runoff election in December 2022.[2][413][414]

By November 12, Democrats had retained the Senate,[415] as the Democratic incumbents in Arizona and Nevada (Mark Kelly and Catherine Cortez Masto) were projected to have retained their seat.[2][3][4] The winner of the Senate race in Alaska, one of the few states to use ranked-choice voting in the United States, which saw Republican incumbent Lisa Murkowski and Republican challenger and Trump-endorsed Kelly Tshibaka as the two remaining potential victors of the race, was not determined until November 24, when Murkowski was projected to have won.[416] If Warnock prevails in Georgia, 2022 would represent the first election since the passage of the Seventeenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in which no Senate incumbents lost reelection.[417] Some gubernatorial races, such as in Arizona and Nevada, were not projected for several days, as they were too close call.[224] Kari Lake, the Republican candidate in Arizona who denied Trump's loss in 2020,[418] refused to concede.[419]

Over two weeks later, results in many races are still unknown.[374][375] Several tossup or key races were won by Democrats,[2][420][421] including upsets in Colorado's 8th, North Carolina's 13th, and Washington's 3rd congressional districts,[2] and narrowly missing a further upset for the Colorado's 3rd congressional district seat held by Lauren Boebert.[422] On November 10–12, Republicans were favored to regain control of the House with a narrow majority of 3 seats (221–214) according to NBC News,[423][424][396] with 218 seats needed for a majority.[2] On November 13, Republicans and Democrats were projected to win 210–200 seats in the House according to Decision Desk HQ,[425] 211–203 according to the Associated Press,[426] and 211–206 according to ABC News.[427] By November 14, Republicans were projected to possibly have a narrow majority in the House by as little as a single seat.[2] On November 15, the projected seats in favor of Republicans were 217–203 per Decision Desk HQ,[425] 217–205 per the Associated Press,[426] and 215–207 per ABC News.[427] Later on the same day, Decision Desk HQ projected a Republican majority of the House,[428] which was followed by other news outlets the next day.[429][430]

Fears of democratic backsliding

Countries autocratizing (red)  or democratizing (blue) substantially and significantly (2010–2020) according to the V-Dem Institute; countries in grey are substantially unchanged.
Countries autocratizing (red) or democratizing (blue) substantially and significantly (2010–2020) according to the V-Dem Institute; countries in grey are substantially unchanged.

Democratic backsliding was a concern among voters. Polls show that many voters feared that Trump and Republicans would lead to the collapse of democracy in the United States.[431][432] Several news outlets tracked the midterm results of 2020 election deniers, including Al Jazeera,[433] Axios,[434] the BBC,[435] Bloomberg News,[436] CNN,[437] The New York Times,[438] and The Washington Post;[439] there were hundreds of election deniers candidates among Republicans,[440] and according to one analysis 60 percent of Americans had election deniers on the ballot.[441] In decisive battleground states, several such candidates ran for governor or secretary of state, both of which are positions overseeing elections and certifying their results.[2] As of November 10, of the 199 Republican candidates for the House, Senate, governor, secretary of state, and attorney general who have denied the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, 134 or 67 percent were projected to win their races, 52 were projected to lose, and 13 had yet to be called; of those 134, 112 were incumbent members of the House.[442] All but one (Chuck Gray of Wyoming) of the candidates for secretary of state lost in 2022.[2][443][444]

While many election deniers (at least more than 100) ultimately won congressional seats, most of them were incumbents who voted to not certify the 2020 presidential election results but avoided comments after the January 6 U.S. Capitol attack,[2] a majority of those who lost conceded but there remains a wide partisan divide regarding trust of the electoral process;[445] those who made electoral fraud claims central to their campaign, in particular those who were newcomers, lost.[2] In general, those Republican candidates who were backed by Trump or were 2020 election deniers underperformed.[446][447][448] At the same time, some far-right Republican candidates obtained limited success, in which allies of Trump and Marjorie Taylor Greene flipped some blue seats.[449]

In Arizona, Cochise County, a Republican-controlled county,[450][451] which was won by Lake,[452] is refusing to certify the results and Hobbs' win amid baseless fraud allegations,[453][454] and is being sued as a result.[455][456] State elections director Kori Lorick said the machines have been certified, and if they were not certified by the deadline for the statewide canvass on December 5, the county's votes would be excluded; this could potentially result in a different winner in at least two close races (U.S. House seat and state schools chief) from Republican to Democrat.[457] In Pennsylvania, Luzerne County was also refusing to certify the results after the county board deadlocked 2–2; the one abstention voter later said he would vote to certify at a future meeting.[458]

Potential green wave

Some environmental organizations and media described the result as a green wave, saying candidates addressing climate change did better compared to those considered who did not.[459][460][461] Among Republicans who won, they did not campaign against climate measures in the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022. Biden specifically thanked young climate voters.[32] This was also reflected at the state and local level, where voters approved several climate-related initiatives.[462] Additionally, the green wave possibly helped block Republican control of Congress by influencing the elections in Georgia.[463]

Pundits predictions and polling

Many pundits in the media failed to predict the Democrats' resilient performance,[464][465][466] Simon Rosenberg was one exception.[467] Republican pollsters such as the Trafalgar Group had a notable polling miss, with errors outside the margin in races such as Washington's incumbent Senator Patty Murray.[468] Since 2016 and 2020, the latter of which was at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, polling companies attempted to understand the misses in recent years and how to get better.[469][470][471] There were also fewer polls in general, and a larger share came from partisan sources.[472]

Polls were relatively good,[11] especially when compared to 2020, though not as good as what FiveThirtyEight, a polling aggregator website,[466] defines as the Gold Standard (2006–2012). Prior to the elections, it discussed the bias of polls in previous election cycles, which overstated or underestimated both parties, and whether there was now a systematic bias in favor of Democrats since 2016, which was also reflected in 2020,[473] but did not exclude that 2022 could be akin 1998 or 2002 (after Dobbs) or have a bias in favor of Republicans,[474][475] as it happened.[400] Their own forecasting model, which gave Republicans 59 and 84 percent of winning the Senate (slight favored) and the House (favored), respectively,[476][477] assumed the possibility that polls underestimated Republicans; its polls-only version saw the Senate as a tossup.[478] Many pollsters had their own worries,[479] and many feared they would miss Republican overperformances as it happened in 2016 and 2020 in particular.[480]

Speculated 2024 Republican presidential candidates

As some moderate Republicans admitted that the party had an extremist problem and had a moment of reckoning,[403] including criticism of Trump among conservatives on social media and cable news,[481] many analysts believed that the results set up a potential contest between DeSantis and Trump for the 2024 Republican Party presidential primaries.[18][19][482]

Despite losses, Trump called the results a "great evening", though those close to him reported him "livid" and "furious with everyone" for the losses, in particular the Senate open seat in Pennsylvania. About DeSantis, Trump stated that he was ready to reveal what he described as "bad things" about him, claiming to know him "more than anyone else, perhaps more than [his wife]."[396] On November 15, the beginning of the Trump 2024 presidential campaign was officially announced.[483][484]

Turnout

Turnout was relatively high by midterm standards. After the blue wave of 2018, it was the second highest since the 1970 U.S. elections.[485] The trend was confirmed by turnout among young voters (18–29), which was also the highest (after 2018) since the 1970s,[36][37] and helped Democrats,[35] even as Republicans turned out in greater numbers;[403] for example, youth and Latino voters turnout in a battleground state like Arizona was historically high.[418] According to the Edison Research National Election Pool, the youth vote for the House was 63–35 in favor of Democrats. Pollster Antonio Arellano commented that young voters were the only age group in which more than 50 percent of voters supported Democrats.[396]

Firsts

Arkansas, Massachusetts, and New York elected female governors for the first time, and Arkansas and Massachusetts became the first states in which women concurrently served as governor and lieutenant governor. Alabama elected its first female senator, California elected a Latino senator for the first time, and Maryland elected its first African-American governor.[486] Markwayne Mullin became the first Native American to represent Oklahoma in the Senate since Robert Latham Owen retired in 1925. In Florida, Maxwell Frost became the first member of Generation Z elected to the House. Marcy Kaptur's reelection will make her the longest-serving woman in Congress if she serves out her term. Becca Balint became the first female member of Congress from Vermont—the last of the 50 states to elect a woman to Congress—and Summer Lee became the first black woman from Pennsylvania elected to Congress.[487]

The 2022 election was the first time that LGBT candidates appeared on the general election ballot in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.[488] With their respective victories, Tina Kotek of Oregon and Maura Healey of Massachusetts became the first openly lesbian state governors.[489] James Roesener, elected to the New Hampshire House of Representatives, became the first transgender man to win a state legislative seat.[490]

Election night television viewership

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The 2022 Kansas Value Them Both Amendment referendum took place on August 2.
  2. ^ Control of the Class 3 Senate seat in Georgia has not yet been determined, and will be decided with a run-off election.
  3. ^ a b Bernie Sanders and Angus King are independents but caucus with the Senate Democrats and are counted with them.
  4. ^ Republicans also held de facto control of Nebraska's officially non-partisan unicameral legislature.
  5. ^ Garcetti has been nominated to the post of United States Ambassador to India and it is unknown if he will end his term early. Should this occur, the Los Angeles City Council will appoint an interim mayor to finish the remainder of his term.
  6. ^ Garcetti has been nominated to the post of United States Ambassador to India and it is unknown if he will end his term early. Should this occur, the Los Angeles City Council will appoint an interim mayor to finish the remainder of his term.
  7. ^ a b Republicans won a majority of seats in the Alaska House of Representatives, but a majority caucus coalition was formed by a coalition of Democrats, independents, and moderate Republicans. In the Alaska Senate, Republicans hold the majority.
  8. ^ a b One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  9. ^ a b The unicameral Nebraska Legislature is officially nonpartisan, but a majority of its members identify as Republicans.
  10. ^ a b One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  11. ^ a b c d The federal district does not have a governor or state legislature but elects the mayor of Washington, D.C., as well as the Council of the District of Columbia.
  12. ^ a b Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga affiliates with the Democratic Party.
  13. ^ Republicans control the Northern Mariana Islands Senate, but no party holds a majority in the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives.
  14. ^ The Northern Mariana Islands' delegate to Congress, Gregorio Sablan, was elected as an independent and has caucused with Democrats since taking office in 2009. In 2021, he rejoined the local Democratic Party and ran as a Democrat in 2022.
  15. ^ A coalition of independents and Democrats maintained control of the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives and gained control of the Northern Mariana Islands Senate during the 2022 elections.[357]
  16. ^ a b Puerto Rican Governor Pedro Pierluisi is a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party, but affiliates with the Democratic Party at the national level.
  17. ^ a b Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with Republicans since taking office in 2017.

References

  1. ^ "Al Jazeera's guide to the US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. November 7, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao "How Election Week 2022 Went Down". FiveThirtyEight. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c Vakil, Caroline (November 12, 2022). "Cortez Masto wins in Nevada, securing Democratic control of Senate". The Hill. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  4. ^ a b c Burnett, Sara; Colvin, Jill; Weissert, Will. "Democrats keep Senate majority as GOP push falters in Nevada". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  5. ^ a b c d e Cowan, Richard (November 17, 2022). "Republicans win U.S. House majority, setting stage for divided government". Reuters. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  6. ^ a b Zurcher, Anthony (November 7, 2022). "US election results: Where do midterm elections leave Biden?". BBC News. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  7. ^ a b c Nwanevu, Osita (November 10, 2022). "Did Democrats just have the best midterms by a president's party in years?". The Guardian. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  8. ^ a b c d Yglesias, Matthew (November 9, 2022). "Democrats did far better than expected. How come?". The Guardian. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  9. ^ a b c d e Kinery, Emma (November 9, 2022). "Midterm results are looking increasingly sunny for Biden as he touts 'strong night' for Democrats". CNBC. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  10. ^ a b c d Tumulty, Karen (November 9, 2022). "The expected red wave looks more like a puddle". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Koerth, Maggie (November 18, 2022). "So You Think You Can Explain The Election". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Hounshell, Blake (November 9, 2022). "Five Takeaways From a Red Wave That Didn't Reach the Shore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  13. ^ a b c Knowles, Hannah; Scherer, Michael (November 9, 2022). "Democrats show strength, leaving fight for control of Congress unresolved". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  14. ^ a b c McGraw, Meridith (November 9, 2022). "Trump's biggest midterm bets don't pay out". Politico. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  15. ^ a b c Smith, Allan (November 14, 2022). "Democrat Katie Hobbs defeats MAGA favorite Kari Lake in high-stakes race for governor in Arizona". NBC News. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  16. ^ a b c d e f Rakich, Nathaniel (November 9, 2022). "Gubernatorial Races Were A Mixed Bag For Each Party". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  17. ^ a b Carlton, Jim; Flores, Adolfo (November 11, 2022). "Republican Joe Lombardo Elected Nevada Governor". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  18. ^ a b c d Pengelly, Martin (November 9, 2022). "'Two more years!': Ron DeSantis victory brings Trump and 2024 into focus". The Guardian. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  19. ^ a b c Arnsdorf, Issac; Dawsey, Josh (November 9, 2022). "Trump absorbs GOP losses, while DeSantis glows with landslide victory". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  20. ^ a b Perkins, Tom (November 17, 2022). "How Michigan Democrats took control for the first time in decades". The Guardian. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  21. ^ a b Crampton, Liz (November 9, 2022). "Democrats take legislatures in Michigan, Minnesota and eye Pennsylvania". Politico. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  22. ^ a b Bradner, Eric; Krieg, Gregory; Merica, Dan (November 9, 2022). "Takeaways from the 2022 midterm elections". CNN. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  23. ^ a b Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (November 9, 2022). "Abortion Rights Are Reshaping American Politics". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  24. ^ a b Calfas, Jennifer; Kusisto, Laura (November 9, 2022). "Abortion-Rights Supporters Prevail in Midterm Ballot Measures". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  25. ^ a b c d e Case, Benjamin S.; McQuarrie, Michael (November 18, 2022). "The Left Won Big on Ballot Initiatives. That's Why They're Under Attack". Jacobin. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  26. ^ a b c Davis, Elliott (November 9, 2022). "Maryland, Missouri Voters Approve Recreational Pot". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  27. ^ a b c Mueller, Tabitha (November 25, 2022). "Indy Explains: Nevada passed the ranked-choice voting, open primary ballot question. What happens next?". The Nevada Independent. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  28. ^ a b c d "2022 ballot measures results". Ballotpedia. May 31, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  29. ^ a b O'Connor, John (November 15, 2022). "Illinois voters approve collective bargaining amendment". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  30. ^ a b c Morrison, Aaron (November 9, 2022). "Slavery, involuntary servitude rejected by 4 states' voters". AP News. Associted Press. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c Radde, Kaitlyn (November 17, 2022). "Louisiana voters rejected an antislavery ballot measure. The reasons are complicated". NPR. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  32. ^ a b c Hatch, Chris (November 10, 2022). "A 'green wave' in America". Canada's National Observer. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  33. ^ a b Skibell, Arianna (November 11, 2022). "Midterms: A lesson in climate politics". Politico. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  34. ^ a b c Newman, Rick (November 14, 2022). "What voters told Republicans in the midterm elections". Yahoo! News. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  35. ^ a b c Salam, Erum (November 11, 2022). "Analysis: Young voters hailed as key to Democratic successes in midterms". The Guardian. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  36. ^ a b Keating, Dan; Melgar, Luis; Perry, Kati; Rabinowitz, Kate (November 9, 2022). "Where voter turnout exceeded 2018 highs". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  37. ^ a b Lopez, Ashley (November 10, 2022). "Turnout among young voters was the second highest for a midterm in past 30 years". NPR. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  38. ^ a b Teixeira, Ruy (November 6, 2022). "Democrats' Long Goodbye to the Working Class". The Atlantic. Retrieved November 9, 2022. As we move into the endgame of the 2022 election, the Democrats face a familiar problem. America's historical party of the working class keeps losing working-class support. And not just among white voters. Not only has the emerging Democratic majority I once predicted failed to materialize, but many of the nonwhite voters who were supposed to deliver it are instead voting for Republicans. ... From 2012 to 2020, the Democrats not only saw their support among white working-class voters — those without college degrees — crater, they also saw their advantage among nonwhite working-class voters fall by 18 points. And between 2016 and 2020 alone, the Democratic advantage among Hispanic voters declined by 16 points, overwhelmingly driven by the defection of working-class voters. In contrast, Democrats' advantage among white college-educated voters improved by 16 points from 2012 to 2020, an edge that delivered Joe Biden the White House.
  39. ^ Hard, Ali (October 17, 2022). "US midterms: The 10 key races that will decide fate of the Senate". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  40. ^ Nagle, Molly; Pecorin, Allison (December 19, 2021). "Manchin says he's a 'no' on Biden's Build Back Better social spending plan". ABC News. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  41. ^ Samuels, Alex (January 20, 2022). "Why A Failed Voting Rights Push Is A Setback For Democracy — And Democrats". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  42. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (January 27, 2022). "Why Manchin And Sinema Will Probably Vote For Biden's Supreme Court Pick". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  43. ^ Nadeem, Reem (April 15, 2021). "Biden Nears 100-Day Mark With Strong Approval, Positive Rating for Vaccine Rollout". Pew Research Center. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  44. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (August 27, 2021). "Biden's Declining Approval Rating Is Not Just About Afghanistan". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  45. ^ Diaz, Daniella (December 19, 2021). "Manchin says he won't vote for Build Back Better Act". CNN. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  46. ^ Hill, Crystal (June 2, 2021). "Biden calls out Sinema, Manchin for voting 'more with Republicans'". Yahoo! News. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  47. ^ Frostenson, Sarah (October 12, 2021). "Why Has Biden's Approval Rating Gotten So Low So Quickly?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  48. ^ Arango, Tim; Smith, Mitch (November 2, 2021). "Youngkin Wins Virginia Governor's Race, Dealing Blow to Democrats on Telling Election Day". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  49. ^ Oliphant, James (November 3, 2021). "Analysis: Biden's Struggles, Education Wars Propel Youngkin's Virginia Victory". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  50. ^ Mucha, Sarah (November 3, 2021). "Youngkin wins Virginia governor race in upset for Democrats". Axios. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  51. ^ Shepard, Steven; Siders, David (November 3, 2021). "Democrats' nightmare, Republicans' resurgence: Takeaways from a big election night". Politico. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  52. ^ Fandos, Nicholas; Glueck, Katie (November 3, 2021). "N.Y. Democrats Assess Losses to Republicans: 'This Was a Shellacking'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  53. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (January 3, 2022). "Why The President's Party Almost Always Has A Bad Midterm". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  54. ^ Prokop, Andrew (February 17, 2022). "The presidential penalty". Vox. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  55. ^ a b Fuong, Holly; Skelley, Geoffrey (May 17, 2022). "We Asked 2,000 Americans About Their Biggest Concern". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  56. ^ Fuong, Holly; Skelley, Geoffrey (October 27, 2022). "Voters Don't Think Either Party Deserves To Govern". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  57. ^ Lucas, Ryan (September 27, 2021). "FBI Data Shows An Unprecedented Spike In Murders Nationwide In 2020". NPR. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  58. ^ Cox, Daniel (November 29, 2021). "Why Crime Likely Won't Be An Issue In The 2022 Midterms". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  59. ^ a b Skelley, Geoffrey (August 10, 2022). "How Democrats And Republicans Think Differently About Crime And Gun Violence". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 18, 2022.
  60. ^ Potts, Monica; Qamar, Zoha (June 24, 2022). "A Gas Holiday Might Be Popular, But It's Unlikely To Do Much To Lower Inflation". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  61. ^ Barrett, Nicholas (August 25, 2022). "Why are global gas prices so high?". BBC News. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  62. ^ Rogers, Kaleigh; Samuels, Alex; Skelley, George; Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (January 4, 2022). "5 Things To Watch Going Into The Midterms". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  63. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (August 24, 2022). "Yes, Special Elections Really Are Signaling A Better-Than-Expected Midterm For Democrats". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  64. ^ Silver, Nate (August 12, 2022). "Will This Be An Asterisk* Election?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  65. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (October 24, 2022). "The Polls Are Getting Better For Republicans". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  66. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (November 3, 2022). "Republicans Are Just A Normal Polling Error Away From A Landslide — Or Wiping Out". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  67. ^ King, Maya; Kashinsky, Lisa (November 3, 2021). "Progressives win big in Boston on an otherwise tough night for the left". Politico. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  68. ^ McKinley, Jesse (November 3, 2021). "Buffalo mayor's race hangs in the balance with write-in ballots". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  69. ^ Milligan, Susan (November 3, 2021). "Who Lost on Election Day? Progressives". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  70. ^ Greve, Joan E (August 6, 2022). "Progressives bullish despite mixed results in Democratic primaries". The Guardian. Archived from the original on August 18, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  71. ^ Conroy, Meredith (September 27, 2022). "Progressives Took A Step Back In The 2022 Primaries — But They're Playing The Long Game". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  72. ^ Conroy, Meredith (November 8, 2022). "Where Will Progressives Win Today?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  73. ^ Weisman, Jonathan (June 16, 2022). "Democrats' Risky Bet: Aid G.O.P. Extremists in Spring, Hoping to Beat Them in Fall". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 5, 2022.
  74. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (October 18, 2022). "Democrats Spent Loads Boosting Republicans They Thought Were Less Electable. Will It Pay Off?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  75. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (May 11, 2022). "Trump's Candidate Lost In Nebraska — But Trump Is Still Winning Most Of His Primaries". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  76. ^ Le Bars, Stéphanie (August 14, 2022). "Trump still has a tight grip on the Republican primaries". Le Monde. Archived from the original on September 6, 2022. Retrieved November 29, 2022.
  77. ^ Astor, Maggie; Paybarah, Azi (August 16, 2022). "Here's where Trump's endorsement record stands in Republican primaries". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 3, 2022. Retrieved November 29, 2022.
  78. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel; Wilkes, Mackenzie (December 8, 2021). "Trump's 2022 Endorsements Are Earlier, Bolder And More Dangerous Than When He Was President". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  79. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (August 29, 2022). "Trump's Endorsees Have Started Losing More. But Don't Read Into That For 2024". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  80. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel; Yi, Jean (April 19, 2022). "More Than 70 Percent Of Trump's Endorsees Believe The 2020 Election Was Fraudulent". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  81. ^ Harb, Ali (November 9, 2022). "US midterm vote: How Democrats thwarted an anticipated 'red wave'". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  82. ^ Solender, Andrew (November 9, 2022). "Tracking Trump's endorsement in key midterm races". Axios. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  83. ^ a b Nerkar, Santul (December 14, 2021). "Why Biden Can't Win On Inflation". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  84. ^ Nerkar, Santul; Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (April 26, 2022). "Were The Stimulus Checks A Mistake?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  85. ^ a b Chittenden, William (October 31, 2022). "Why inflation will likely stay sky-high regardless of which party wins the midterms". The Conversation. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  86. ^ Nerkar, Santul (March 14, 2022). "Why Americans May — Or May Not — Blame Biden For Higher Gas Prices". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  87. ^ a b Suleymanova, Radmilla (October 6, 2022). "US midterm elections: Five economic issues to watch". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  88. ^ Aratani, Lauren (October 13, 2022). "US prices rise in September as midterm elections loom". The Guardian. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  89. ^ Moore, Lela (November 4, 2022). "On the ballot in the US midterms: Economy". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  90. ^ Nerkar, Santul (February 10, 2022). "What Democrats And Republicans Get Wrong About Inflation". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  91. ^ a b c Kitchener, Caroline; Knowles, Hannah (September 5, 2022). "In sprint to November, Democrats seize on shifting landscape over abortion". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 5, 2022.
  92. ^ Samuels, Alana (October 31, 2022). "Is Inflation Biden's Fault? Could Tax Cuts Fix It? Here's What We Know". Time. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  93. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Harb, Ali (October 31, 2022). "US midterm elections: What are the key issues?". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 3, 2022.
  94. ^ Horsley, Scott (November 7, 2022). "Inflation is top issue in this week's midterms". NPR. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  95. ^ Bose, Nandita; Hunnicutt, Trevor; Mason, Jeff (October 25, 2022). "Midterm elections outlook darkens for Biden's White House". Reuters. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  96. ^ Saad, Lydia (October 31, 2022). "Economy Is Top Election Issue; Abortion and Crime Next". Gallup. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  97. ^ Potts, Monica (November 6, 2022). "Control Of The Senate Could Rest On Abortion And Inflation In Nevada". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  98. ^ Lucas, Rob (May 2, 2022). "The Link Between Gas Prices and Presidential Approval Ratings". Michigan Journal of Economics. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  99. ^ Cohn, Nate (September 26, 2022). "Is It the Gase Prices, Stupid?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  100. ^ Bump, Philip (October 18, 2022). "Gas prices have been strongly correlated to views of President Biden and support for his party". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  101. ^ Kondik, Kyle (March 17, 2022). "Gas Prices and Presidential Approval". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Center for Politics. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  102. ^ Kondik, Kyle (March 23, 2022). "Link between gas prices and presidential approval seems to be weakening". The Pulse. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  103. ^ Radcliffe, Mary (November 17, 2022). "Abortion Was Always Going To Impact The Midterms". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  104. ^ "Democrat who campaigned on abortion rights wins in New York special election". The Guardian. Reuters. August 24, 2022. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  105. ^ "Biden rallies supporters around abortion rights ahead of midterms". Al Jazeera. October 18, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  106. ^ Gambino, Lauren (August 24, 2022). "Democrats' hopes rise for midterms amid backlash over abortion access". The Guardian. Archived from the original on September 4, 2022.
  107. ^ a b Weixel, Nathaniel (August 21, 2022). "State ballot measures are new abortion battleground". The Hill. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  108. ^ Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (September 19, 2022). "Lindsey Graham's Abortion Ban Is Dividing GOP Senate Candidates In Swing States". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  109. ^ Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (September 12, 2022). "Why Republicans Keep Failing To Pass Abortion Bans". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  110. ^ Best, Ryan; Radcliffe, Mary; Rogers, Kaleigh (June 7, 2022). "Where Democrats And Republicans Differ On Gun Control". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  111. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (June 9, 2022). "Over 40 Percent Of Americans Now Rate Gun Violence As A Top Issue". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  112. ^ "Record-High 56% in U.S. Perceive Local Crime Has Increased". Gallup. October 28, 2022. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  113. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (May 26, 2022). "Support For Gun Control Will Likely Rise After Uvalde. But History Suggests It Will Fade". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  114. ^ Koerth, Maggie (June 1, 2022). "We've Known How To Prevent A School Shooting for More Than 20 Years". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  115. ^ Greeve, Joan (October 1, 2022). "Gun reformers feel history is on their side despite bleak outlook in Congress". The Guardian. Retrieved October 26, 2022.
  116. ^ Axelrod, Tal. "Crime remains top of mind for midterm voters: As Republicans pounce, Democratic leads shrink". ABC News. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  117. ^ Edelman, Adam; Korecki, Natasha; Gomez, Henry J. "In key battlegrounds, GOP onslaught of crime ads tightens Senate races". NBC News. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  118. ^ Dale, Daniel (October 23, 2022). "Fact check: The GOP's dishonesty-filled barrage of 'defund the police' attack ads". CNN. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  119. ^ Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (June 23, 2022). "What the Supreme Court's Gun Ruling Means For Gun Control". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  120. ^ "Control of US Congress at stake as midterm election underway". Al Jazeera. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  121. ^ Holland, Steve (August 25, 2022). "Biden has harsh words for Republicans ahead of political rally". Reuters. Retrieved August 25, 2022.
  122. ^ "Biden slams 'semi-fascism' in GOP as he rallies for Democrats". Al Jazeera. August 26, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  123. ^ Ford, Matt (August 30, 2022). "It Matters That Joe Biden Used the F-Word". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  124. ^ Weisman, Jonathan (September 1, 2022). "Biden Calls on Americans to Resist Threats to Democracy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  125. ^ Kanno-Youngs, Zolan; Shear, Michael D. (September 1, 2022). "Biden Warns That American Values Are Under Assault by Trump-Led Extremism". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  126. ^ Matza, Max; Smith, Sarah (September 2, 2022). "Joe Biden says Trump ideology threatens US democracy". BBC News. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  127. ^ Harb, Ali (October 31, 2022). "Eroding trust: How election deniers endanger US democracy". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  128. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (July 18, 2022). "At Least 120 Republican Nominees Deny The Results Of The 2020 Election". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  129. ^ Rogers, Kaleigh (August 25, 2022). "Election Denying Primary Candidates Are Crying Fraud, Win Or Lose". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  130. ^ Concepcion, Summer (October 16, 2022). "Kari Lake refuses to say whether she would accept loss in Arizona election". NBC News. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  131. ^ Stepansky, Joseph (October 24, 2022). "Q&A: Before US midterms, advocate warns of voting barriers". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  132. ^ "Democracy 'on the ballot' as US midterms loom: Biden". Al Jazeera. November 3, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  133. ^ Ingram, Kyle (July 7, 2022). "Powerful Democratic law firm intervened in NC Green Party certification". The News & Observer. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  134. ^ "NC Democrats are undermining democracy with Green Party attack". The News & Observer. August 3, 2022. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  135. ^ Jacobs, Rusty (August 8, 2022). "NC Green Party claims vindication after US judge orders state to make room for party on ballot". WUNC. Retrieved November 5, 2022.
  136. ^ Hoyt, Conrad (July 14, 2022). "As investigation into false signatures continues, Green Party sues State Board of Elections". WITN. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  137. ^ Schoenbaum, Hannah (August 4, 2022). "Democrats sue to keep Green Party off North Carolina ballot". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  138. ^ Lu, Jazper (October 24, 2022). "Green Party candidate Matthew Hoh running for U.S. Senate to 'disrupt the current political system'". Duke Chronicle. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  139. ^ Gold, Emelia; Johnson, Theodore R.; Zhao, Ashley (May 9, 2022). "How Anti-Critical Race Theory Bills Are Taking Aim At Teachers". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  140. ^ Yi, Jean (May 12, 2022). "Why Trans Rights Became The GOP's Latest Classroom Target". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  141. ^ Qamar, Zoha (August 26, 2022). "Americans Don't Want Books Banned, But They're Divided Over What Schools Teach". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  142. ^ Brown, Hayes (October 7, 2022). "How a viral hoax about furries became fodder for the GOP's moral panic". MSNBC. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  143. ^ Goggin, Ben; Kingkade, Tyler; Zadrozny, Brandy (October 14, 2022). "How an urban myth about litter boxes in schools became a GOP talking point". NBC News. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  144. ^ Fuong, Holly; Skelley, Geoffrey (September 29, 2022). "Do Democrats And Republicans Agree On Anything About Climate Change And Immigration?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  145. ^ Koerth, Maggie (October 17, 2022). "Can Focusing On Climate Change Help Win Elections?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  146. ^ Sandell, Clayton (October 14, 2022). "Election '22: What Matters: Climate Change Is A Key Issue". Newsy. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  147. ^ St. Martin, Victoria (October 22, 2022). "Poll: Climate Change Is a Key Issue in the Midterm Elections Among Likely Voters of Color". Inside Climate News. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  148. ^ "Fox News Voter Analysis". Fox News. November 13, 2022. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  149. ^ Qamar, Zoha; Rogers, Kaleigh (August 19, 2022). "Americans Are Well Aware Of Climate Change — But Not About The Government's Efforts To Fight It". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  150. ^ Storrow, Benjamin (August 8, 2022). "Senate Passes Historic Climate Bill—Here's What Comes Next". Scientific American. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  151. ^ Thompson, Andrea (August 12, 2022). "What Scientists Say about the Historic Climate Bill". Scientific American. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  152. ^ "Biden signs $740bn health, climate, tax 'Inflation Reduction Act'". Al Jazeera. August 16, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  153. ^ "Who will control the US Congress?". Inside Story. Al Jazeera. November 7, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  154. ^ Tesler, Michael (August 17, 2021). "Republican Views On Immigration Are Shifting Even Further To The Right Under Biden". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  155. ^ Qamar, Zoha (August 4, 2022). "When Republicans Talk About Immigration, They Don't Just Mean Illegal Immigration". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  156. ^ "Nationwide Encounters". U.S. Customs and Border Protection. November 14, 2022.
  157. ^ Hesson, Ted; Morgan, David; Lange, Jason (October 5, 2022). "Republicans have edge on crime, immigration ahead of U.S. midterms -Reuters/Ipsos poll". Reuters. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  158. ^ Montoya-Galvez, Camilo (October 31, 2022). "Poll finds broad support in battleground states for legalizing unauthorized immigrants". CBS News. Retrieved November 1, 2022.
  159. ^ Tomasky, Michael (September 19, 2022). "The Republican Meltdown on Martha's Vineyard". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved October 1, 2022.
  160. ^ Shephard, Alex; Tomasky, Michael; Strauss, Daniel (September 20, 2022). "What If Ron DeSantis's Martha's Vineyard Stunt Wasn't Actually Good Politics?". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved October 1, 2022.
  161. ^ Gaudiano, Nicole (September 16, 2022). "What's next for the migrants: Govs. DeSantis and Abbott sent to Martha's Vineyard and Kamala Harris' doorstep". Business Insider. Retrieved September 20, 2022.
  162. ^ Rogers, Kaleigh; Qamar, Zoha (September 23, 2022). "How Americans Feel About Republican Governors Sending Migrants To Blue Cities". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 26, 2022.
  163. ^ Sherman, Mark (August 24, 2022). "Legality of Joe Biden's Student Loan Plan Relies on Coronavirus Pandemic, 2003 HEROES Law". NBC New York. Retrieved August 26, 2022.
  164. ^ Ford, Matt (September 29, 2022). "Conservatives Found Someone Who's Been Traumatized by Biden's Student Debt Plan". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  165. ^ Collinson, Stephen (August 25, 2022). "Biden's student loan plan opens a fresh midterm front". CNN. Archived from the original on September 7, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  166. ^ Guzman, Joseph (August 24, 2022). "Most Americans support student loan forgiveness, poll finds". The Hill. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  167. ^ "Harvard CAPS Harris Poll: October 12–13, 2022" (PDF). Harvard Center for American Political Studies. October 14, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  168. ^ Stern, Mark Joseph (September 27, 2022). "Why the New Legal Attack on Biden's Student Loan Relief Is Already Doomed". Slate. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  169. ^ Ford, Matt (August 31, 2022). "Can the Conservative Legal Movement Stop Biden's Student Loan Relief Plans?". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  170. ^ Taylor, Astra (November 7, 2022). "Biden Can Still Counter the Bogus Right-Wing Student Loan Lawsuits". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  171. ^ Nerkar, Santul (May 31, 2022). "Canceling Student Debt Could Help Close The Wealth Gap Between White And Black Americans". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  172. ^ Shephard, Alex (August 26, 2022). "Centrists Don't Like Biden's Student Loan Plan. So Why Don't They Do Something About It?". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  173. ^ "Biden's student loan forgiveness plan faces challenge in federal court". NewsHour. PBS. October 12, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  174. ^ "Six Republican-led states appealing dismissal of lawsuit over student loan relief". NewsHour. PBS. October 21, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  175. ^ Butler, Peter (November 15, 2022). "Student Loan Debt Relief Now Blocked by Two Courts: Will It Ever Happen?". CNET. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  176. ^ "Federal judge in Texas strikes down Biden's student loan forgiveness plan". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  177. ^ Thakker, Prem (November 1, 2022). "Biden Extends Pause on Student Loan Payments". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  178. ^ Frostenson, Sarah (March 16, 2022). "Is Biden's Approval Rating Really Rebounding?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  179. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (July 14, 2022). "What's Behind Biden's Record-Low Approval Rating?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  180. ^ Spady, Aubrie (September 1, 2022). "Poll: Democrats' midterm chances improve while inflation and abortion remain top election issues". Fox News. Archived from the original on September 7, 2009. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  181. ^ Potts, Monica (September 2, 2022). "What's Driving Biden's Approval Rating Up?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  182. ^ Osgood, Brian (October 10, 2022). "What are the US midterm elections? Here's all you need to know". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  183. ^ Gans, Jared (October 19, 2022). "Biden approval rating hovering near its lowest point weeks ahead of midterms: survey". The Hill. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  184. ^ Cillizza, Chris (October 26, 2022). "Joe Biden's poll numbers are in a very bad place for Democrats". CNN. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  185. ^ Potts, Monica (March 3, 2022). "What Do Americans Think About War?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  186. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (March 4, 2022). "Americans Care About The Invasion Of Ukraine — But That Doesn't Mean They Will Rally Around Biden". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  187. ^ Samuels, Alex (March 4, 2022). "Americans Are Still Unsure How The U.S. Should Respond To The Invasion Of Ukraine". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  188. ^ Azari, Julia (March 10, 2022). "Why It's Important To Debate Foreign Policy Even In Times Of Conflict". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  189. ^ Lauter, David (March 11, 2022). "Essential Politics: War in Ukraine scrambles GOP and Democratic strategies for midterms". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 27, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  190. ^ Bradner, Eric; Krieg, Gregory (March 27, 2022). "The 2022 campaign story was set. Then Russia invaded Ukraine". CNN. Archived from the original on June 5, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  191. ^ McKay, Hannah (November 7, 2022). "Russia's Prigozhin admits interfering in U.S. elections". Reuters. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  192. ^ "Press release: Total cost of 2022 state and federal elections projected to exceed $16.7 billion". OpenSecrets News. November 3, 2022. Retrieved November 8, 2022.
  193. ^ "United States Senate elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. March 19, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  194. ^ Riccardi, Nicholas; Ritter, Ken (November 12, 2022). "Cortez Masto wins in Nevada, giving Democrats Senate control". AP News. Associted Press. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  195. ^ Korecki, Natasha. "Cortez Masto defeats Laxalt in Nevada, handing Democrats control of the Senate". NBC News. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  196. ^ Macaya, Melissa; Meyer, Matt; Rocha, Veronica; Vogt, Adrienne (November 12, 2022). "Nov. 12, 2022 US election coverage". CNN. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  197. ^ "United States Congress elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. November 1, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  198. ^ Wright, Jasmine (January 17, 2021). "Kamala Harris to resign Senate seat Monday". CNN. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  199. ^ Chugtai, Alia; Glasse, Jennifer (November 1, 2022). "Infographic: All you need to know about the US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 29, 2022.
  200. ^ Newsom, Gavin (January 18, 2021). "Proclamation and Writ of Election" (PDF). Executive Department, State of California. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  201. ^ Wilson, Reid (September 28, 2021). "California rule change means Padilla faces extra election". The Hill. Archived from the original on September 28, 2021. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  202. ^ Chughtai, Alia; Glasse, Jennifer (November 1, 2022). "Infographic: All you need to know about the US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  203. ^ Castleman, Terry; Fry, Hannah; Mehta, Seema (November 9, 2022). "Alex Padilla makes history as first Latino elected to U.S. Senate from California". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  204. ^ Martin, Jonathan (February 24, 2022). "James Inhofe, Oklahoma Senator, Is Said to Plan an Early Retirement". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 24, 2022.
  205. ^ Murphy, Sean (November 8, 2022). "Republican's Lankford, Mullin win Oklahoma Senate seats". AP. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  206. ^ "United States House of Representatives elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. November 6, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  207. ^ "US midterm elections: Live results in maps and charts". Al Jazeera. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  208. ^ "Special elections to the 117th United States Congress (2021–2022)". Ballotpedia. December 26, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  209. ^ Homan, Timothy R. (April 6, 2021). "Florida Rep. Alcee Hastings dead at 84". The Hill. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  210. ^ Daugherty, Alex (May 4, 2021). "DeSantis schedules special election for Alcee Hastings' seat in 2022". Miami Herald. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  211. ^ Weigel, David (January 11, 2021). "Democrat Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick wins House seat in Florida special election". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  212. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Flinn, Ally; Wasserman, David (April 15, 2021). "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  213. ^ Korte, Lara (December 6, 2021). "Devin Nunes' retirement could mean an opening for California Democrats. Who might run?". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  214. ^ "Connie Conway is going to Washington D.C., wins Nunes' seat in Congress". Visalia Times Delta. June 8, 2022 [2022-06-07]. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  215. ^ Livingston, Abby (March 31, 2022). "U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela steps down, setting up a heated battle for his South Texas district". The Texas Tribune. Archived from the original on April 1, 2022. Retrieved April 1, 2022.
  216. ^ Alfaro, Mariana; Paúl, María Luisa (March 26, 2022). "Rep. Fortenberry to resign after being found guilty of lying to FBI". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  217. ^ Omastiak, Rebecca (February 18, 2022). "US Rep. Hagedorn dies at age 59". KSTP-TV. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  218. ^ Cohen, Ethan; Krieg, Gregory (August 10, 2022). "Republican Brad Finstad will win special election in Minnesota's 1st Congressional District, CNN projects". CNN. Retrieved August 10, 2022.
  219. ^ Brooks, James (March 2, 2022). "Alaska's first ranked-choice election will be a special vote to replace Rep. Don Young". Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  220. ^ Fandos, Nicholas; Ferre-Sadurni, Luis (May 3, 2022). "Hochul Chooses Antonio Delgado as New Lieutenant Governor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 3, 2022.
  221. ^ Erbacher, August (May 10, 2022). "Congressman Tom Reed resigns, effective immediately, following sexual misconduct accusation". WKBW-TV. Retrieved May 12, 2022.
  222. ^ Fordan, Clare; Zanona, Melanie (August 3, 2022). "Indiana Republican Rep. Jackie Walorski dies in car accident that also killed 2 staffers". CNN. Archived from the original on August 3, 2022. Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  223. ^ "Gubernatorial elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. November 1, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  224. ^ a b c d Harte, Julian; Trotta, Daniel (November 9, 2022). "Democrats win governors' races in three crucial 'blue wall' states". Reuters. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  225. ^ a b Edelman, Adam (November 9, 2022). "Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly wins re-election, defeating GOP challenger Derek Schmidt". NBC News. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  226. ^ Borrud, Hillary (November 9, 2022). "Tina Kotek wins Oregon governor's race, fending off strongest Republican bid in a decade". The Oregonian/OregonLive. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  227. ^ Rush, Claire; Selsky, Andrew (November 10, 2022). "Democrat Tina Kotek wins Oregon governor's race". AP News. Associted Press. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  228. ^ a b Bohrer, Becky (November 25, 2022). "Mike Dunleavy is 1st Alaska governor reelected since '98". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 27, 2022.
  229. ^ Parris, Pat (November 7, 2022). "Arizona's unique history of governors includes record number of women". KGUN 9 Tucson News. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  230. ^ Barchenger, Stacey (November 14, 2022). "Katie Hobbs elected Arizona's 5th female governor, defeating election denier Kari Lake". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  231. ^ Reston, Maeve (November 11, 2022). "Republican Joe Lombardo will defeat Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak, CNN projects". CNN. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  232. ^ Lochead, Colton (November 12, 2022). "Joe Lombardo wins Nevada governor's race after Sisolak concedes". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  233. ^ "Attorney General elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. January 7, 2021. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  234. ^ "Vermont Attorney General election, 2022". Ballotpedia. August 6, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  235. ^ "Clark wins Vt. attorney general contest". WCAX. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  236. ^ Krieg, Gregory; Menezes, Andrew (November 9, 2022). "Meet the history-makers of the 2022 midterm elections". CNN. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  237. ^ Gruber-Miller, Stephen (November 9, 2022). "Republican Brenna Bird defeats Democrat Tom Miller in Iowa attorney general race". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  238. ^ Stern, Seth (November 9, 2022). "Longest-Ever Serving State Attorney General Defeated in Iowa (2)". Bloomberg Law. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  239. ^ "Secretary of State elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. December 23, 2022. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  240. ^ "Vermont Secretary of State election, 2022". Ballotpedia. May 12, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  241. ^ "Treasurer elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. February 9, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  242. ^ "Vermont Treasurer election, 2022". Ballotpedia. July 26, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  243. ^ "State judicial elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. January 18, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  244. ^ Cohen, Zach C.; Ebert, Alex; Wheeler, Lydia (November 9, 2022). "GOP High Courts in Ohio, North Carolina Hold Redistricting Power". Bloomberg Law. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  245. ^ Keith, Douglas; Powers, Amanda (November 9, 2022). "Key 2022 State Supreme Court Election Results and What They Mean". Brennan Center for Justice. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  246. ^ Benshoff, Laura (November 22, 2022). "How GOP state supreme court wins could change state policies and who runs Congress". NPR. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  247. ^ "State legislative elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. January 15, 2019. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  248. ^ "NCSL State Elections 2022". National Conference of State Legislatures. September 21, 2022. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  249. ^ a b c Kight, Stef W.; McCammond, Alexi (November 11, 2022). "Democrats make quiet history with state-level gains". Axios. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  250. ^ Lai, Jonathan; Marin, Max; Orso, Anna (November 17, 2022). "Democrats appear to have won a majority of seats in the Pa. House for the first time in 12 years". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  251. ^ Greenberger, Scott S. (November 9, 2022). "Democrats Hold Governorships, Make State Legislative Gains". Pew Charitable Trust. Pew Research Center. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  252. ^ "Alaska Democrats, Republicans form coalition Senate majority". AP News. Associted Press. November 26, 2022. Retrieved November 26, 2022.
  253. ^ a b Narea, Nicole (November 11, 2022). "Democrats have notched wins in state legislatures — with likely more to come". Vox. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  254. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (October 26, 2022). "The Most Important Elections Of 2022 Could Be In State Legislatures". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  255. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (November 17, 2022). "The Midterms Made State Governments Bluer". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  256. ^ McCausland, Phil (November 10, 2022). "Democrats make big gains in state legislatures after beating expectations". CNBC. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  257. ^ a b Levine, Sam (November 18, 2022). "Why the Democrats' biggest wins of the midterms weren't in Washington DC". The Guardian. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  258. ^ Bowden, Bridgit (November 9, 2022). "Wisconsin Republicans fail to achieve veto-proof majority". Wisconsin Public Radio. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  259. ^ McCausland, Phil (November 10, 2022). "Democrats make big gains in state legislatures after beating expectations". CNBC. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  260. ^ "Potential 2022 ballot measures". Ballotpedia. January 22, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  261. ^ "2022 ballot measures". Ballotpedia. January 7, 2021. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  262. ^ Glueck, Katie; Smith, Mitch (August 3, 2022). "Kansas Votes to Preserve Abortion Rights Protections in Its Constitution". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  263. ^ Colliver, Victoria (June 27, 2022). "Abortion rights land on California's November ballot". Politico. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  264. ^ "Abortion on the Ballot". The New York Times. November 8, 2022. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  265. ^ Beaumont, Hilary (November 11, 2022). "US abortion rights advocates celebrate five-state election sweep". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  266. ^ Potts, Monica (August 30, 2022). "Why Republican Voters Support Ballot Initiatives Their Red States Do Not". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  267. ^ "Nevada Question 3, Top-Five Ranked Choice Voting Initiative (2022)". Ballotpedia. September 22, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  268. ^ Meyers, David (November 9, 2022). "Ballot measures will change how democracy is practiced in many states". The Fulcrum. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  269. ^ Clyde, Don (November 13, 2022). "Nevada voters back big changes to their election system". NPR. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  270. ^ Golonka, Sean (October 25, 2022). "Question 3 backers promote ranked-choice voting with major out-of-state money". Nevadan Independent. p. 1. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  271. ^ Meyers, David (November 9, 2022). "Ballot measures will change how democracy is practiced in many states". The Fulcrum. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  272. ^ Richardson, Katelynn (November 10, 2022). "All three Nevada ballot questions seem to have majority support as vote count continues". The Center Square. p. 1. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  273. ^ Japsen, Bruce (November 9, 2022). "Medicaid Expansion Wins In Red State South Dakota". Forbes. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  274. ^ "Tennessee 2022 ballot measures". Ballotpedia. October 26, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2022.
  275. ^ "Marijuana and Drug Policy on the Ballot". The New York Times. November 8, 2022. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  276. ^ Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas (October 22, 2022). "Why a Question About Slavery Is Now on the Ballot in 5 States". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  277. ^ "United States mayoral elections, 2022". Ballotpedia. May 4, 2021. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  278. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel; Sweedler, Maya (June 7, 2022). "The 6 Political Neighborhoods Of Los Angeles". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  279. ^ Medina, Jennifer (June 8, 2022). "Rick Caruso and Karen Bass head to a runoff in the Los Angeles mayor's race". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  280. ^ "Karen Bass and Rick Caruso head to runoff in Los Angeles mayoral race". The Guardian. June 8, 2022. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  281. ^ Oreskes, Benjamin; Rainey, James; Wick, Julia (November 8, 2022). "Caruso takes slight lead in an L.A. mayoral race still too close to call". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  282. ^ Blood, Michael R. (November 16, 2022). "LA elects US Rep Karen Bass mayor, first Black woman in post". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  283. ^ Wick, Julia (November 16, 2022). "Karen Bass elected mayor, becoming first woman to lead L.A." Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  284. ^ Gore, Hogan; Hayes, Jana (February 8, 2022). "David Holt wins second term as Oklahoma City mayor". The Oklahoman. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  285. ^ Durr, Alison; Glauber, Bill; Spicuzza, Mary (April 5, 2022). "Cavalier Johnson becomes first African American elected mayor of Milwaukee, defeats Bob Donovan in the spring general election". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  286. ^ "Norman's Heikkila Defeats Incumbent Clark in Mayor's Race". U.S. News & World Report. Associated Press. April 5, 2022. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  287. ^ Muckerman, Brooke (April 16, 2022). "New mayor, council member to be sworn in Monday". Columbia Missourian. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  288. ^ D'Annunzio, Francesca (May 9, 2022). "These North Texas cities have new mayors after the May 7 election". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  289. ^ "Baraka wins reelection in Newark mayoral race". New York Amsterdam News. May 12, 2022. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  290. ^ "Mayor Vi Lyles wins third term, Bokhari wins tight District 6 race". WBTV. July 26, 2022. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  291. ^ Finerman, Grace (August 16, 2021). "Mayor Linda Gorton announces bid for reelection". WKYT-TV. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  292. ^ Kang, Hanna; Zavarise, Isabella (November 17, 2022). "Results: Mayor Linda Gorton defeats David Kloiber in Lexington, Kentucky's mayoral election". Insider. Retrieved November 30, 2022 – via Yahoo! News.
  293. ^ Brich, Monica (July 31, 2022). "Eight running for Fort Smith city director positions; primary voting in one race". Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  294. ^ Crockett, Ashley (February 1, 2022). "Little Rock Mayor Frank Scott Jr. announces he will seek a second four-year term in office". KATV. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  295. ^ Flaherty, Joseph (November 9, 2022). "Little Rock Mayor Frank Scott Jr. defeats Steve Landers and two other challengers to win second term". Arkansas Online. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  296. ^ Breen, Daniel (November 9, 2022). "Little Rock Mayor wins re-election; Republicans win big in Arkansas contests". KUAR. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  297. ^ Tauss, Leigh (December 22, 2020). "Exclusive: Raleigh Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin Will Seek Second Term". Indy Week. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  298. ^ Kang, Hanna; McFall Johnsen, Morgan (November 16, 2022). "Results: Mary-Ann Baldwin defeated Terrance Ruth in Raleigh, North Carolina's mayoral election". Insider. Retrieved November 30, 2022 – via Yahoo!.
  299. ^ Robison, Mark (March 8, 2022). "Hillary Schieve files to run for final term as Reno mayor". Reno Gazette-Journal. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  300. ^ Hall, Madison; Zavarise, Isabella (November 16, 2022). "Results: Mayor Hillary Schieve defeats Eddie Lorton in Reno, Nevada's mayoral election". Insider. Retrieved November 30, 2022 – via Yahoo!.
  301. ^ Yarbrough, Beau (July 6, 2022). "Here's who won the major San Bernardino County races in the June 7 primary". The San Bernardino Sun. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  302. ^ Toohey, Grace (November 10, 2022). "Daughter of Vietnamese refugees to become San Bernardino's first Asian American mayor". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  303. ^ Bridges, Tyler (August 19, 2022). "Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins can run for re-election, Louisiana Supreme Court rules". The Advocate. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  304. ^ Dante, Kendrick (August 22, 2022). "Who's running for Shreveport Mayor in 2022? Here's a list of candidates". The Times. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  305. ^ "Fuller, Perkins concede mayoral race; Tarver and Arceneaux to meet in runoff Dec. 10". KSLA. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  306. ^ Bailey, Karah (September 29, 2021). "Tallahassee Mayor John Dailey announces 2022 campaign kickoff". WTXL-TV. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  307. ^ Burlew, Jeff (November 8, 2022). "'What a night': After bitter battle, Dailey defeats Dozier in Tallahassee mayor's race". Tallahassee Democrat. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  308. ^ Brice-Saddler, Michael; Weil, Julie Zauzmer (November 4, 2021). "Muriel Bowser Will Seek a Third Term as D.C. Mayor". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  309. ^ Casillas, Mauricio; DiMargo, Carissa (November 8, 2022). "DC Election Results: Bowser Wins 3rd Term as Mayor; Voters OK More Pay for Tipped Workers". NBC4 Washington. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  310. ^ Kang, Hanna; Zavarise, Isabella (November 9, 2022). "Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defeats Republican Stacia Hall in Washington, DC's mayoral election". Insider. Retrieved November 30, 2022 – via Yahoo!.
  311. ^ "Harry Sidhu resigning as mayor of Anaheim amid Angels Stadium scandal". The Arizona Republic. Associated Press. May 23, 2022. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
  312. ^ Spear, Madeline (May 23, 2022). "Anaheim Mayor Harry Sidhu resigns amid FBI probe". CBS News. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
  313. ^ https://finance.yahoo.com/news/georgia-runoff-election-day-2022-090147550.html
  314. ^ https://augustachronicle.com/story/news/2022/03/15/who-candidates-running-mayor-augusta/7034394001/
  315. ^ https://statesman.com/story/news/2022/02/22/former-texas-sen-kirk-watson-joins-austin-mayor-race/6886337001/
  316. ^ https://www.chulavistatoday.com/community/latino-palestinian-candidate-seeks-to-replace-mayor-mary-casillas-salas-in-chula-vista-4758167
  317. ^ https://thenevadaindependent.com/article/march-cant-run-for-re-election-as-henderson-mayor-goodman-to-serve-extra-18-months-under-bill-moving-municipal-election-dates
  318. ^ https://www.kgns.tv/2022/11/09/laredo-mayoral-candidates-headed-runoff/
  319. ^ https://www.ketk.com/news/special-reports/border-report/a-24-7-job-laredos-new-mayor-will-inherit-binational-leadership-role/
  320. ^ https://www.kgns.tv/2022/02/02/several-elected-positions-city-laredo-will-be-november-2022-ballot/
  321. ^ White, Jeremy (December 17, 2021). "Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia to run for retiring Lowenthal's seat". Politico. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  322. ^ https://www.nbclosangeles.com/decision-2022/rex-richardson-long-beach-mayor-election/3034352/
  323. ^ https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-11-15/first-black-mayor-long-beach-rex-richardson
  324. ^ https://www.politico.com/newsletters/california-playbook/2022/03/11/whos-running-and-who-isnt-00016450
  325. ^ https://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/politics/elections/kentucky/2022/11/08/craig-greenberg-bill-dieruf-louisville-mayor-kentucky-election-2022/69509589007/
  326. ^ https://www.businessinsider.com/results-craig-greenberg-bill-dieruf-louisville-kentucky-mayoral-election-2022
  327. ^ Young, Adam (November 19, 2021). "Lubbock Mayor Dan Pope won't seek re-election to 4th term". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  328. ^ Hall, Brett; Reese, Brian (December 2, 2021). "Newport News Councilwoman Tina Vick running for mayor". WAVY-TV. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  329. ^ Schnell, Mychael (May 17, 2021). "North Las Vegas mayor running for Nevada governor". The Hill. Retrieved May 17, 2021.
  330. ^ https://www.sfchronicle.com/projects/2022/california-voter-guide-november/
  331. ^ https://www.kron4.com/news/bay-area/san-jose-mayor-endorses-candidate-to-replace-him/
  332. ^ Brollini, Lyndsey (April 25, 2022). "Tlingit and Haida delegates reelect president, pass resolutions at Tribal Assembly". KTOO Public Media. Juneau, Alaska. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  333. ^ a b c Benallie, Kalle (September 7, 2022). "2022 tribal council elections so far". Indian Country Today. Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  334. ^ "San Carlos Apache Tribe Chairman Rambler wins historic, unprecedented fourth consecutive term". Indian Country Today. November 11, 2022.
  335. ^ Corn, Louise Red (June 7, 2022). "Geoffrey Standing Bear, RJ Walker win Principal Chief and Assistant Principal Chief". Osage News. Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  336. ^ Keppner, Delaney (June 6, 2022). "SRMT releases unofficial election results for Tribal Chief". Watertown, New York: WWTI/ABC50. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  337. ^ Skurzewski, Joe (November 9, 2022). "Mark Fox, new tribal councilmembers sworn in on Fort Berthold". KFYR-TV. Bismark, North Dakota. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  338. ^ Skurzewski, Joe (November 2, 2022). "Final election results for Turtle Mountain Tribe". KFYR-TV. Bismark, North Dakota. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  339. ^ Pollard, Aidan (November 20, 2022). "Cheryl Andrews-Maltais Reelected for Third Consecutive Term". The Vineyard Gazette. Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. Retrieved November 21, 2022.
  340. ^ J., Alex (April 13, 2022). "Tunica-Biloxi Tribe Re-Elects Chairman Marshall Pierite". Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  341. ^ Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma (March 5, 2022). "Results for the March 5, 2022 Election for Chief". Retrieved July 13, 2022 – via Facebook.
  342. ^ Berbermeyer, Greg (August 5, 2022). "Rupnick re-elected PBP tribal chair". MSC News. Hiawatha, Kansas. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  343. ^ Hancock, Andrea (July 25, 2022). "Byrd reelected, but two ousted from Quapaw Nation Business Committee". NonDoc. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  344. ^ "Puyallup Tribal Council welcomes re-elected members, selects leadership". Indian Country Today. Pine Ridge, South Dakota. June 10, 2022. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  345. ^ Delaware Tribe of Indians (November 5, 2022). "Election Results" – via Facebook.
  346. ^ "Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Announces Tribal Council Election Results". Indian Gaming. Liberty Lake, Washington. April 6, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  347. ^ Juillerat, Lee (May 10, 2022). "Klamaths under new leadership". Herald and News. Klamath Falls, Oregon. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  348. ^ "Certified Election Results for September 11, 2022". Kaw Nation. September 22, 2022. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  349. ^ "Chief Kirk Francis re-elected as Penobscot leader for sixth term". News Center Maine. Bangor, Maine. August 16, 2022. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  350. ^ French, Edward (September 23, 2022). "Newell elected tribal chief at Sipayik". The Quoddy Tides. Eastport, Maine. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  351. ^ Fonseca, Felicia (November 8, 2022). "Buu Nygren wins Navajo Nation president, beats incumbent". Associated Press. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  352. ^ "United Houma Nation Announces Lora Ann Chaisson as Principal Chief Elect". The Houma Times. Houma, Louisiana. June 6, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  353. ^ Bruce, Barbara (April 12, 2022). "It's official, Kasey Velasquez is WMAT Chairman-elect". White Mountain Independent. Show Low, Arizona. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  354. ^ Lerner, Julia (March 20, 2022). "Nooksack chairman loses tribal election". Cascadia Daily News. Bellingham, Washington. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  355. ^ Hazelton, Hanky (May 19, 2022). "Red Lake Nation Releases Unofficial Results for 2022 General Election". Lakeland PBS. Bemidji, Minnesota. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  356. ^ Scherer, Kimmy (November 9, 2022). "Ryman LeBeau defeats incumbent Harold Frazier in Chairman-at-Large race". West River Eagle. Eagle Gutte, South Dakota. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  357. ^ Manglona, Thomas (November 16, 2022). "Independents, Democrats take control of the CNMI Senate". KUAM News. Hagåtña, Guam. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  358. ^ Smolar, Piotr (November 9, 2022). "US midterm elections: Uncertainty over Congress is a nasty surprise for Republicans". Le Monde. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  359. ^ Kamarck, Elaine (November 9, 2022). "The 2022 midterms show some swing states are leaning Democratic". Brookings Institution. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  360. ^ Galston, William A. (November 9, 2022). "What do the 2022 midterms mean for 2024?". Brookings Institution. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  361. ^ "US midterm results: Where things stand in House, Senate races". Al Jazeera. November 10, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  362. ^ Seitz-Wald, Alex (November 16, 2022). "Republicans win control of the House, NBC News projects, overtaking Democrats by a slim margin". NBC News. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  363. ^ Burnett, Sara; Colvin, Jill; Weissert, Will (November 16, 2022). "Republicans win back control of House with narrow majority". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  364. ^ Kurtzleben, Danielle (November 25, 2022). "What we know (and don't know) about how abortion affected the midterms". NPR. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  365. ^ Brownstein, Ronald (November 14, 2022). "While Democrats may have bucked the national trend, Republicans still hold a large sway in GOP-led states". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  366. ^ Simmons, Dan; Wines, Michael (November 12, 2022). "Young Voters Helped Democrats. But Experts Differ on Just How Much". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  367. ^ Enten, Harry (November 13, 2022). "How Joe Biden and the Democratic Party defied midterm history". CNN. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  368. ^ "2022 Election: Live Analysis and Results". FiveThirtyEight. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 9, 2022. ... Democrats' strong showing in this district speaks to a trend that we've been seeing — that this has been a historically good midterm for Democrats. ... Democrats are on track to have the best outcome for the president's party since 1950, given the president's low approval rating.
  369. ^ a b c Gabbatt, Adam (November 13, 2022). "Who were the big winners and losers of the US midterm elections?". The Guardian. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  370. ^ "Democrat John Fetterman wins US Senate race in Pennsylvania". AP News. Associated Press. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  371. ^ Krieg, Gregory; Merica, Dan (November 10, 2022). "How Fetterman flipped Pennsylvania". CNN. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  372. ^ Samuels, Alex (November 9, 2022). "Runoffs Are Sort Of Georgia's Thing Now". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  373. ^ Allison, Natalie; Everett, Burgess; Levine, Marianne (November 11, 2022). "'They completely f--ked up': How the GOP lost its grip on the Senate majority". Politico. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  374. ^ a b "Midterm Elections 2022". AP News. Associated Press. November 23, 2022. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  375. ^ a b "US midterm elections 2022". The Guardian. November 23, 2022. Archived from the original on November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  376. ^ Silver, Nate (November 9, 2022). "Candidate Quality Mattered". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  377. ^ a b Stanage, Niall (November 10, 2022). "Winners and losers of the 2022 midterm elections". The Hill. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  378. ^ Jacobs, Ben (November 9, 2022). "3 winners and 4 losers from the midterm results so far". Vox. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  379. ^ a b Cillizza, Chris (November 9, 2022). "Winners and losers from the 2022 election so far". CNN. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  380. ^ "Oregon Governor Election Results". The New York Times. November 8, 2022. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  381. ^ a b c Merrill, Curt; Wolf, Zachary B. (November 9, 2022). "Anatomy of a close election: How Americans voted in 2022 vs. 2018". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  382. ^ "Exit polls for Midterm Election Results 2022". CNN. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  383. ^ a b Coronado, Acacia; Gomez Licon, Adriana (November 20, 2022). "GOP sees slight Latino vote gains, painful candidate losses". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  384. ^ Conroy, Meredith; Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia (November 16, 2022). "A Historic Number Of Women Will Be Governors Next Year". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  385. ^ "The Uncalled Races Of The 2022 Election: Live Updates". FiveThirtyEight. November 14, 2022. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  386. ^ Boucher, Dave (November 9, 2022). "Michigan Democrats take control of state House, Senate in historic power shift". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  387. ^ Maguire, Sean (November 10, 2022). "Alaska election results point toward a closely divided Legislature". Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  388. ^ Cole, Shannon (November 26, 2022). "Alaska State Senate forms Senate majority". Alaska's News Source. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  389. ^ Timmins, Annmarie (November 9, 2022). "Democrats make gains in New Hampshire House, retain federal seats". New Hampshire Bulletin. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  390. ^ Slater, Joanna (November 18, 2022). "Inside a 'wild' New Hampshire recount with the state House at stake". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  391. ^ Ramer, Holly (November 23, 2022). "GOP gains in NH recount, but matter isn't settled yet". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  392. ^ "2022 Election: Live Analysis and Results". FiveThirtyEight. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 9, 2022. And in Pennsylvania, the House is currently 100–100, with three seats still TBD ... .
  393. ^ Lai, Jonathan; Marin, Max; Orso, Anna (November 16, 2022). "Democrats won a majority of seats in the Pa. House for the first time in 12 years". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  394. ^ Weber, Peter (November 17, 2022). "Democrats appear to have flipped the Pennsylvania House, may be short votes to pick a speaker". Yahoo! News. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  395. ^ a b Kestler-D'Amours, Jillian; Najjar, Farah. "Biden urges cooperation in next Congress after divisive midterms". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  396. ^ a b c d "US elections: the Republicans do not break through, the Senate in the balance. Biden: 'Back in the running in 2024'". Italy 24 Press News. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  397. ^ Smith, David (November 17, 2022). "Pelosi to depart as top House Democrat to make way for 'new generation'". The Guardian. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  398. ^ a b Finnerty, Deirdre; Sheerin, Jude (November 8, 2022). "US election: Control of Congress hangs in balance after midterms". BBC News. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  399. ^ a b Ax, Joseph (November 10, 2022). "U.S. Senate up for grabs as Republicans move toward House majority". Reuters. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  400. ^ a b Nast, Condé (November 10, 2022). "The Accurate Election Polls That No One Believed". The New Yorker. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  401. ^ Cohn, Nate (November 11, 2022). "Why Some States Went in Different Directions in Midterms". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  402. ^ Druke, Galen; Silver, Nate (November 14, 2022). "Why Democrats Beat Historical Trends In 2022". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  403. ^ a b c Wolf, Zachary B. (November 14, 2022). "These Republicans are admitting the party has an extremism problem". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  404. ^ Catenacci, Thomas (November 8, 2022). "Fox News Voter Analysis: Republicans make significant inroads with Hispanic voters". Fox News. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  405. ^ "When will we know the results of the US midterm elections?". Al Jazeera. November 7, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  406. ^ "2022 midterms live updates: Latest election news from AP". AP News. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  407. ^ "2022 race calls". AP News. Associated Press. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 9, 2022.
  408. ^ Reid, Tim; Ax, Joseph (November 11, 2022). "Control of U.S. Congress hangs in balance as states labor to count ballots". Reuters. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  409. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (November 17, 2022). "Republicans Won The House — Barely". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  410. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (November 9, 2022). "Who Will Control The House And Senate? Here's What We Can Say At 4:30 a.m." FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  411. ^ Davis, Ben (November 17, 2022). "John Fetterman shows how Democrats can win back working-class Trump voters". The Guardian. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  412. ^ "Key takeaways – so far – from the US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  413. ^ Samuels, Alex (November 9, 2022). "Can Raphael Warnock Pull Off Another Senate Runoff?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  414. ^ Samuels, Alex (November 15, 2022). "Congress Will Have The Most Black Republicans In Over A Century". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  415. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (November 13, 2022). "A Blue Nevada Means Democrats Will Keep Control Of The Senate". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  416. ^ Bohrer, Becky (November 24, 2022). "GOP's Lisa Murkowski wins reelection in Alaska Senate race". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  417. ^ Ulloa, Jazmine (November 11, 2022). "Despite Discontent, Midterm Voters Did Not Kick Out Incumbents". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  418. ^ a b Singh, Maanvi (November 20, 2022). "'Extremists didn't make it': why Republicans flopped in once-red Arizona". The Guardian. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  419. ^ Levine, Sam (November 17, 2022). "Election denier Kari Lake refuses to concede Arizona governor race she lost". The Guardian. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  420. ^ "Live Election Results: Top Races to Watch". The New York Times. November 8, 2022. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  421. ^ Salam, Erum (November 20, 2022). "How Democratic wins in key toss-up seats helped stave off the 'red wave'". The Guardian. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  422. ^ Rogers, Kaleigh (November 17, 2022). "Why Lauren Boebert Didn't Cruise To Victory". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  423. ^ "House of Representatives Midterm Election 2022: Live Updates, Results & Map". NBC News. November 8, 2022. Archived from the original on November 10, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  424. ^ "Midterms latest: Biden says he 'gets' voter frustration but results are 'clear message to preserve democracy'". Sky News. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022. This first live counter shows the make-up of the House of Representatives so far. The latest estimate from NBC News has the Republicans winning 221 House seats compared with the Democrats' 214, meaning they would still take control but with much less authority than the 40+ gains anticipated by some pollsters. A margin for error is attached to that estimate as well, so what it truly means is that either party could still win.
  425. ^ a b "2022 House Results". Decision Desk HQ. November 13, 2022. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  426. ^ a b Clarke, Seán; de Hoog, Niels; Leach, Anna; Voce, Antonio (November 15, 2022). "US midterm elections results 2022: live". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 16, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  427. ^ a b "Election 2022 Results and Live Updates: House Results". ABC News. November 8, 2022. Archived from the original on November 15, 2022. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  428. ^ Decision Desk HQ [@DecisionDeskHQ] (November 15, 2022). "Decision Desk HQ projects Republicans have won a majority in the U.S. House with at least 218 seats. Final count pending calls in 14 outstanding races" (Tweet). Retrieved November 16, 2022 – via Twitter.
  429. ^ Bullock, J.J. (November 15, 2022). "Republicans projected to secure House majority". NewsNation. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  430. ^ Kinnard, Meg (November 17, 2022). "Why AP has called control of the US House for Republicans". AP News. Associated Press. Retrieved November 17, 2022.
  431. ^ Dolby, Nuha; Fields, Gary (November 10, 2022). "Future of American democracy loomed large in voters' minds". AP News. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  432. ^ "After the midterms, America and its democracy look stronger". The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  433. ^ Osgood, Brian (November 15, 2022). "Election deniers lose key races in US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  434. ^ Solender, Andrew (November 9, 2022). "Here's how election deniers have fared in key midterm races". Axios. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  435. ^ Devlin, Kayleen; Goodman, Jack (November 9, 2022). "Boebart to Lake: how election deniers have fared in US midterms". BBC News. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  436. ^ Teague Beckwith, Ryan (November 9, 2022). "Tracking the 2020 Election Deniers and How They're Faring in the Midterms". Bloomberg News. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  437. ^ Dale, Daniel (November 9, 2022). "How 2020 election deniers did in their 2022 midterm races". CNN. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  438. ^ Cai, Weiyi; Ivory, Danielle; Wu, Ashley; Yourish, Karen (November 9, 2022). "See Which 2020 Election Deniers and Skeptics Won in the Midterm Elections". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  439. ^ Blanco, Adrian; Gardner, Amy; Wolfe, Daniel (November 8, 2022). "Tracking which 2020 election deniers are winning, losing in the midterms". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  440. ^ Dale, Daniel (November 5, 2022). "A guide to the election deniers in midterm races". CNN. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  441. ^ "60 Percent Of Americans Will Have An Election Denier On The Ballot This Fall". FiveThirtyEight. November 8, 2022. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  442. ^ Rogers, Kaleigh (November 10, 2022). "Denying The 2020 Election Wasn't A Winning Strategy For Political Newcomers". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  443. ^ Corasaniti, Nick (November 12, 2022). "Voters Reject Election Deniers Running to Take Over Elections". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  444. ^ Gardner, Amy; Thebault, Reis; Klemko, Robert (November 13, 2022). "Election deniers lose races for key state offices in every 2020 battleground". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  445. ^ Qamar, Zoha (November 18, 2022). "Election Denialism Lives On, Even As Candidates Who Support It Concede". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  446. ^ Dougall, David Mac (November 9, 2022). "US midterm elections: What have we learned so far?". Euronews. Retrieved November 11, 2022.
  447. ^ Green, Lloyd (November 9, 2022). "Republicans have someone to blame for their disappointing result: Donald Trump". The Guardian. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  448. ^ "A really bad night for some high-profile Trump-backed candidates". CNN. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  449. ^ Samuels, Ben (November 15, 2022). "Is a Reckoning Awaiting the Republican Party?". Haaretz. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  450. ^ Homans, Charles (November 29, 2022). "G.O.P.-Controlled County in Arizona Holds Up Election Results". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  451. ^ Reston, Maeve; Schouten, Fredreka (November 28, 2022). "Rural Arizona county delays certifying midterm results as election disputes persist". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  452. ^ Otten, Tori (November 1, 2022). "Kari Lake Won the County in Arizona That's Refusing To Certify Election Results". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  453. ^ Parker, Ned; So, Linda (November 28, 2022). "Republicans in one Arizona county refuse to certify election results". Reuters. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  454. ^ Sy, Stephanie (November 29, 2022). "Arizona's election certification delayed by baseless claims of fraud". NewsHour. PBS. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  455. ^ Hillyard, Vaughn; Richards, Zoë (November 29, 2022). "Arizona secretary of state sues GOP-controlled county over refusal to certify election results". NBC News. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  456. ^ Oladipo, Gloria (November 29, 2022). "Arizona secretary of state sues after Republican officials refuse to certify county election results". The Guardian. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  457. ^ Cooper, Jonathan J. (November 28, 2022). "GOP-controlled Arizona county refuses to certify election results". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  458. ^ Montellaro, Zach (November 28, 2022). "Lawsuits likely after handful of counties refuse to certify midterm results". Politico. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  459. ^ Forrest, Jack; Johnson, Lamar; Northey, Hannah (November 10, 2022). "Enviros pounce on wish lists post midterm 'green wave'". E&E News. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  460. ^ Maysmith, Pete (November 15, 2022). "Memo: LCVVF Post-Election Updates – Senate Protected, Green Wave In The States, House Still Too Close To Call". League of Conservation Voters. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  461. ^ R. Platt, John; Lohan, Tara (November 10, 2022). "Midterms 2022: A Green Wave on the Horizon?". The Revelator. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  462. ^ Garza, Frida (November 18, 2022). "Voters pass historic climate initiatives in 'silent surprise' of US midterms". The Guardian. Retrieved November 24, 2022.
  463. ^ "A 'green wave' of environmental voters may have blocked Republican control of Congress". Footprint Coalition. November 10, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  464. ^ Kestler-D'Amours, Jillian; Glasse, Jennifer; Najjar, Farah; Osgood, Brian; Stepansky, Joseph (November 8, 2022). "Republican 'red wave' appears to be ripple in US midterms vote". Al Jazeera. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  465. ^ Kilgore, Ed (November 9, 2022). "How Accurate Were the Polls in the 2022 Elections?". Intelligencer. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  466. ^ a b Eskind, Amy (November 10, 2022). "Why Did Polls Prepare Us for a Red Wave? Experts Weigh In on the Surprising Midterm Election Results". People. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  467. ^ Narea, Nicole (November 27, 2022). "The guy who got the midterms right explains what the media got wrong". Vox. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  468. ^ Hart, Benjamin (November 17, 2022). "The Pollster Who Predicted a Red Wave Explains Himself". Intelligencer. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  469. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel; Skelley, Geoffrey (October 13, 2020). "What Pollsters Have Changed Since 2016 — And What Still Worries Them About 2020". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  470. ^ Coaston, Jane; Omero, Margie; Silver, Nate (October 19, 2022). "Has Polling Broken Politics?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  471. ^ Feldman, Sarah; Mendez, Bernard (October 26, 2022). "Who Are The People Who Don't Respond To Polls?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  472. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (October 25, 2022). "You're Not Imagining It: There Are Fewer Polls This Cycle". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  473. ^ Silver, Nate (March 25, 2021). "The Death Of Polling Is Greatly Exaggerated". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  474. ^ Silver, Nate (September 16, 2022). "Will The Polls Overestimate Democrats Again?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  475. ^ Silver, Nate (November 7, 2022). "The 3 Big Questions I Still Have About Election Day". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  476. ^ Silver, Nate (June 30, 2022). "2022 FiveThirtyEight Election Forecast". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  477. ^ Best, Ryan; Skelley, Geoffrey (October 6, 2022). "The Seats Republicans Could Flip To Win The House In 2022". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  478. ^ Silver, Nate (October 28, 2022). "Where Our Model Thinks The Polls Might Be Biased". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  479. ^ Bui, Quoctrung (October 24, 2022). "Frustrated With Polling? Pollsters Are, Too". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  480. ^ Shepard, Steven (September 26, 2022). "Pollsters fear they're blowing it again in 2022". Politico. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  481. ^ Bender, Michael C.; Haberman, Maggie (November 10, 2022). "Trump Under Fire From Within G.O.P. After Midterms". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2022.
  482. ^ Silver, Nate (November 16, 2022). "Why DeSantis Is A Major Threat To Trump's Reelection". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  483. ^ Jackson, David; Mansfield, Erin; Looker, Rachel (November 15, 2022). "Donald Trump announces his 2024 presidential campaign as GOP debates future: recap: recap". USA Today. Retrieved November 16, 2022.
  484. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (November 16, 2022). "Why Trump Is Favored To Win The 2024 Republican Presidential Primary". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  485. ^ Potts, Monica (November 15, 2022). "Turnout Was High Again. Is This The New Normal?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 20, 2022.
  486. ^ "The historic firsts of the 2022 US midterm elections". Al Jazeera. November 10, 2022. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  487. ^ Krieg, Gregory; Menezes, Andrew (November 9, 2022). "Meet the history-makers of the 2022 midterm elections". CNN. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  488. ^ Lavietes, Matt (October 27, 2022). "In a historic first, LGBTQ Americans will be on the ballot in all 50 states". NBC News. Retrieved November 15, 2022.
  489. ^ Epstein, Reid J. (November 10, 2022). "Tina Kotek, a Progressive, Will Be Oregon's Next Governor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  490. ^ Treisman, Rachel (November 9, 2022). "James Roesener is the first out trans man elected to a U.S. state legislature". NPR. Retrieved November 15, 2022.