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4-AcO-MET
4-Acetoxy-N-methyl-N-ethyltryptamine.svg
Clinical data
Other names4-Acetoxy-MET; Metacetin; 4-Acetoxy-N-methyl-N-ethyltryptamine
Identifiers
  • [3-[2-[ethyl(methyl)amino]ethyl]-1H-indol-4-yl] acetate
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC15H20N2O2
Molar mass260.337 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CCN(C)CCc1c[nH]c2c1c(ccc2)OC(=O)C
  • InChI=1S/C15H20N2O2/c1-4-17(3)9-8-12-10-16-13-6-5-7-14(15(12)13)19-11(2)18/h5-7,10,16H,4,8-9H2,1-3H3
  • Key:OMDKHOOGGJRLLX-UHFFFAOYSA-N

4-Acetoxy-MET (4-Acetoxy-N-methyl-N-ethyltryptamine), also known as metacetin or 4-AcO-MET, is a hallucinogenic tryptamine. It is the acetate ester of 4-HO-MET, and a homologue of 4-AcO-DMT. It is a novel compound with very little history of human use.[1] It is sometimes sold as a research chemical by online retailers.

It is expected that the compound is quickly hydrolyzed into the free phenolic 4-HO-MET by serum esterases, but human studies concerning the metabolic fate of this drug are lacking.[citation needed]

Legality

4-Acetoxy-MET is unscheduled in the United States. It may be considered an analogue of Psilocin, a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act. As such, the sale for human consumption or the use for illicit non-medical purposes could be considered a crime under the Federal Analogue Act[citation needed]

4-Acetoxy-MET is a controlled substance in Switzerland under Verzeichnis E [2]

4-Acetoxy-MET is a Class A drug in the UK because it is an ester of the drug 4-HO-MET, which is a Class A drug under the tryptamine catch-all clause[3]

References

  1. ^ "New psychoactive substances reported to the EMCDDA and Europol for the first time in 2009 under the terms of Council Decision 2005/387/JHA" (PDF). www.emcdda.europa.eu. Retrieved 6 May 2022.
  2. ^ "Fedlex". www.fedlex.admin.ch. Retrieved 2021-08-15.
  3. ^ "Misuse of Drugs Act 1971". 2021-08-15. Archived from the original on 2012-11-11.