← 55 56 57 →
Cardinalfifty-six
Ordinal56th
(fifty-sixth)
Factorization23 × 7
Divisors1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 14, 28, 56
Greek numeralΝϚ´
Roman numeralLVI
Binary1110002
Ternary20023
Octal708
Duodecimal4812
Hexadecimal3816

56 (fifty-six) is the natural number following 55 and preceding 57.

Mathematics

Regular 56-gon, associated by the Pythagoreans with Typhon
Regular 56-gon, associated by the Pythagoreans with Typhon

56 is:

The maximum determinant in an 8 by 8 matrix of zeroes and ones is 56.

Plutarch[6] states that the Pythagoreans associated a polygon of 56 sides with Typhon and that they associated certain polygons of smaller numbers of sides with other figures in Greek mythology. While it is impossible to construct a perfect regular 56-sided polygon using a compass and straightedge, a close approximation has recently been discovered which it is claimed[7] might have been used at Stonehenge, and it is constructible if the use of an angle trisector is allowed since 56 = 23 × 7.[8]

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See also

References

  1. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000292 (Tetrahedral numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  2. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000078 (Tetranacci numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  3. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002378 (Oblong (or promic, pronic, or heteromecic) numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  4. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A024916 (sum_{k=1..n} sigma(k) where sigma(n) = sum of divisors of n)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  5. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A059756 (Erdős-Woods numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  6. ^ Plutarch, Moralia V: 30
  7. ^ Pegs and Ropes: Geometry at Stonehenge
  8. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-07-14. Retrieved 2015-02-19.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Currie, N., "Takemitsu and shakuhachi" Archived 2012-04-10 at the Wayback Machine, Click Opera, Apr. 29, 2007.
  10. ^ Augustin Maurs bio Archived 2016-06-24 at the Wayback Machine, OVGuide.
  11. ^ Alexander, Caroline. "If the Stones Could Speak: Searching for the Meaning of Stonehenge". National Geographic Magazine. National Geographic Society. Retrieved 14 May 2013.
  12. ^ Heaven by Lisa Miller, (2010), ISBN 978-0-06-055475-0 - page 13.