Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abī Qubays
Mount Abu Kubais, Ajyad, Mecca 24231, Saudi Arabia - panoramio.jpg
A view of Mecca Clock Tower from the side of Jabal Abi Qubays
Highest point
Elevation420 m (1,380 ft) Edit this on Wikidata
Coordinates21°25′22″N 39°49′44″E / 21.42278°N 39.82889°E / 21.42278; 39.82889Coordinates: 21°25′22″N 39°49′44″E / 21.42278°N 39.82889°E / 21.42278; 39.82889
Naming
Native name
  • جَبَل أَبُو قُبَيْس  (Arabic)
  • جَبَل أَبِي قُبَيْس  (Arabic)
Geography
Jabal Abū Qubays is located in Saudi Arabia
Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abū Qubays
Location of Abu Qubays in Saudi Arabia
Jabal Abū Qubays is located in Middle East
Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abū Qubays (Middle East)
Jabal Abū Qubays is located in Asia
Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abū Qubays
Jabal Abū Qubays (Asia)
LocationMecca, Makkah Province, Hejaz, Saudi Arabia
Parent rangeHijaz Mountains

Abu Qubays (Arabic: جَبَل أَبُو قُبَيْس \ جَبَل أَبِي قُبَيْس, romanizedJabal Abū Qubays / Jabal Abī Qubays) is a sacred mountain which resides on the eastern frontier of Al-Masjid Al-Haram in Makkah,[1] in the Hejazi region of Saudi Arabia.

Description

Jabal Abu Qubays is located to the east of Al-Masjid Al-Haram, in the right hand side of the photograph. Jabal al-Nour can be seen in the background.
Jabal Abu Qubays is located to the east of Al-Masjid Al-Haram, in the right hand side of the photograph. Jabal al-Nour can be seen in the background.

Although the exact origin of its name is unknown, it is believed to be called Al-Amīn (ٱلْأَمِيْن) in pagan times because the sacred Black Stone resided there according to Muslims[who?]. According to another report, this mountain was also called the Maghārat al-Kanz (مَغَارَة ٱلْكَنْز, "Treasure Cave"), and this was believed to be the place where the first of men stayed and were buried after their death. According to tradition, this is the place where the Islamic Nabi, Prophet Muhammad performed the miracle of splitting the moon into two pieces and then re-attaching those pieces as demanded by the disbelievers of Makkah.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b The Encyclopædia of Islam: A Dictionary of the Geography, Ethnography and Biography of the Muhammadan Peoples. Holland: EJ Brill. 1913. p. 97.