Acts 3
Acts 3:5–6, 10–12 on Uncial 057 from 4th/5th century
BookActs of the Apostles
CategoryChurch history
Christian Bible partNew Testament
Order in the Christian part5

Acts 3 is the third chapter of the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. The book containing this chapter is anonymous but early Christian tradition affirmed that Luke composed this book as well as the Gospel of Luke.[1] This chapter records the healing of a disabled person by the apostles Peter and John, and Peter's preaching at Solomon's Portico in the Temple.[2]

From Raphael's workshop, "Healing of the Lame Man," a cartoon for a tapestry that depicts Peter healing the lame man (Acts 3). The artist used the Solomonic columns in St. Peter's Basilica as models for the columns of the Jewish Temple.
From Raphael's workshop, "Healing of the Lame Man," a cartoon for a tapestry that depicts Peter healing the lame man (Acts 3). The artist used the Solomonic columns in St. Peter's Basilica as models for the columns of the Jewish Temple.

Text

The original text was written in Koine Greek and is divided into 26 verses.

Textual witnesses

Some early manuscripts containing the text of this chapter are:

Old Testament references

A lame man healed (3:1–10)

This section gives one detailed account as an example of Luke's earlier note that "the 'apostolic band' has the power to work miracles" (Acts 2:43).[3]

Verse 2

And a certain man lame from his mother's womb was carried, whom they laid daily at the gate of the temple which is called Beautiful, to ask alms of them that entered into the temple.[4]

The temple in Jerusalem had several gates, but it is not clear which one might have been called Beautiful. No ancient source mentions the Beautiful Gate, but the Nicanor Gate is probably the best guess. Traditionally the gate is identified with the Shushan Gate but, according to C. K. Barrett, that gate was not a suitable location for a beggar.[5]

Verse 6

Then Peter said, "Silver and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk".[6]

The healing of the lame man in this chapter is the inspiration of some songs. One such example is the children's song "Silver and Gold Have I None".[7]

No other name (3:11–26)

These verses record Peter's second speech (after Acts 2), which addresses the same two questions as his first: 'What does this mean?' (cf. 2:12) and 'What shall we do?' (cf. 2:37).[3]

Verse 17

"Yet now, brethren, I know that you did it in ignorance, as did also your rulers."[8]

Verses 22–23

22For Moses truly said to the fathers, 'The Lord your God will raise up for you a Prophet like me from your brethren. Him you shall hear in all things, whatever He says to you. 23And it shall be that every soul who will not hear that Prophet shall be utterly destroyed from among the people.'[9]

Cited from Deuteronomy 18:19, linked with Leviticus 23:29, the prophecy contains the term "prophet like [Moses]" as a "biblical typology".[3]

Verse 26

"To you first, God, having raised up His Servant Jesus, sent Him to bless you, in turning away every one of you from your iniquities."[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Alexander 2007, p. 1028.
  2. ^ Halley, Henry H. Halley's Bible Handbook: an abbreviated Bible commentary. 23rd edition. Zondervan Publishing House. 1962.
  3. ^ a b c d e Alexander 2007, p. 1033.
  4. ^ Acts 3:2 KJV
  5. ^ Barrett, Acts 1–14 (International Critical Commentary), pp. 179–80.
  6. ^ Acts 3:6 KJV
  7. ^ Cedarmont Kids – Silver & Gold Have I None
  8. ^ Acts 3:17 NKJV
  9. ^ Acts 3:22–23 NKJV
  10. ^ Acts 3:26 NKJV

Sources