Al Jama-ah

الجماعة
LeaderGanief Hendricks
Founded23 April 2007
HeadquartersHoward Centre,
Pinelands, Cape Town
IdeologyIslamic democracy
Colours  Green   Black   Red
National Assembly seats
1 / 400
National Council of Provinces
0 / 90
Party flag
Website
www.aljama.co.za

Al Jama-ah (Arabic: الجماعة‎, lit.'the Congregation') is a South African political party. It was formed in 2007 by present leader Ganief Hendricks and contested the 2009, 2014 and 2019 national elections.[1]

The party aims to support Muslim interests and uphold Sharia law. The flag of Al Jama-ah depicts a white gimel, ج, (the first letter in its Arabic name,) upon a field consisting of the other pan-Arab colors.

History

Until 2019, the party had no elected representatives nationally or provincially although it came close in both the 2009 and 2014 elections, and won 9 seats at the local level in the 2016 municipal elections.

It made a breakthrough in 2019, winning its first national representative (becoming the first Islam-affiliated party to do so), as well as one seat in the Western Cape legislature.

Election results

National Assembly

Election Total votes Share of vote Seats +/– Government
2009 25,947 0.15
0 / 400
extraparliamentary
2014 25,976 0.14
0 / 400
extraparliamentary
2019 31,468 0.18
1 / 400
Increase1 in opposition

Provincial elections

Election[2][3] Eastern Cape Free State Gauteng Kwazulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga North-West Northern Cape Western Cape
% Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats
2014 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0.62% 0/42
2019 0.15% 0/63 - - 0.18% 0/73 0.28% 0/80 - - - - - - - - 0.86% 1/42

Municipal elections

In a by-election in November 2020, Al-Jama-ah won a ward in the City of Johannesburg from the Democratic Alliance.[4]

Election Votes % +/–
2011[5] 13,227 0.04%
2016[6] 36,891 0.10%

See also

References

  1. ^ "Final List of Parties to contest the 2009 Elections". Polity.org.za. 2009-03-11. Retrieved 2009-04-13.
  2. ^ http://electionresources.org/za/provinces.php?election=1994&province=WC
  3. ^ "Results Dashboard". www.elections.org.za. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  4. ^ Khumalo, Juniour. "The DA was the biggest loser in this week's by-elections". Citypress. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  5. ^ http://www.elections.org.za/content/LGEPublicReports/197/Detailed%20Results/National.pdf
  6. ^ "Results Summary - All Ballots" (PDF). elections.org.za. Retrieved 11 August 2016.