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Ambalika
Bhisma fight in Swayamvara.jpg
Bhishma abducting princesses Amba, Ambika and Ambalika from the assemblage of suitors at their swayamvara
Information
FamilyParents
  • Kashya (Father)
Sisters

Brothers

Senabindu
SpouseVichitravirya
ChildrenPandu
RelativesPandavas (grand children)

In the epic Mahabharata, Ambalika (Sanskrit: अम्बालिका, ambālikā) is the daughter of Kashya, the King of Kashi, and wife of Vichitravirya, the King of Hastinapur.

Legend

Mahabharata Kuru Family Tree
Mahabharata Kuru Family Tree

Along with her sisters, Amba and Ambika, Ambalika was taken by force by Bhishma from their Swayamvara, the latter having challenged and defeated the assembled royalty. He presented them to Satyavati for marriage to Vichitravirya. Ambalika and her sister spent seven years in their husband's company. Vichitravirya was affected with phthisis, (tuberculosis) and died from the disease.[1][2]

After Vichitravirya's death, his mother Satyavati sent for her first born, Rishi Veda Vyasa. She asked him to father children on the widowed queens of Vichitravirya according to the prevalent custom of Niyoga. Veda Vyasa had come from years of intense meditation and as a result, he looked tremendously unkempt. When he approached Ambika, she closed her eyes in fear. As a result the blind Dhritrashtra was born. When he approached Ambalika, she turned pale in fear. Her son Pandu, the result of the niyoga, was born with a pale appearance.[3][4]

After the death of Pandu, Ambalika accompanied her mother-in-law Satyavati and sister Ambika to the forest and spent the rest of her days in spiritual retreat.[5]

Amablika is also referred to as Kausalya in the Sambhava Parva when her son, Pandu, dies. After Kunti returns with the corpses of Pandu and Madri with the Pandavas, arrangements are made for the funeral of the dead couple. Seeing her son on the funeral pyre, Kausalya faints out of grief.[6]

References

  1. ^ "The Mahabharata, Book 1: Adi Parva: Sambhava Parva: Section CII". Sacred-texts.com. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  2. ^ Bhanu, Sharada (1997). Myths and Legends from India - Great Women. Chennai: Macmillan India Limited. pp. 35–6. ISBN 0-333-93076-2.
  3. ^ "The Mahabharata, Book 1: Adi Parva: Sambhava Parva: Section CV". Sacred-texts.com. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  4. ^ "The Mahabharata, Book 1: Adi Parva: Sambhava Parva: Section CVI". Sacred-texts.com. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  5. ^ "The Mahabharata, Book 1: Adi Parva: Sambhava Parva: Section CXXVIII". Sacred-texts.com. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  6. ^ PC Roy Mahabharata, Sambhava Parva, Adi Parva, Page 297 Link: http://www.holybooks.com/mahabharata-all-volumes-in-12-pdf-files/