American Concession in Shanghai
Foreign Enclave
1848–1863
Flag of American Concession
Flag
Emblem of American Concession
Emblem
History
History 
• Established
1848
• Disestablished
21 September 1863
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Shanghai County
Shanghai International Settlement

The American Concession or Settlement was a foreign enclave (a "concession") within present-day Shanghai which existed from around 1848 until its unification with the city's British area to form the Shanghai International Settlement in 1863.

The concession was located north of the Suzhou River and west of the Huangpu River, in what are today parts of Hongkou District and Jing'an District.

1884 map of Shanghai showing foreign concessions. From north to south: the American Concession (orange), the British Concession (blue), the French Concession (faded red), the Chinese part of the city (yellow).
1884 map of Shanghai showing foreign concessions. From north to south: the American Concession (orange), the British Concession (blue), the French Concession (faded red), the Chinese part of the city (yellow).
Boundary Stone of the American Settlement in Shanghai.
Boundary Stone of the American Settlement in Shanghai.

History

In 1845, the bishop of the American Episcopal Church W. J. Boone bought an area in Hongkew to create real estates in Shanghai, in the name of building a church. Later Boone proposed to create an American settlement in 1848, the Shanghai County agreed with him. On 25 June 1863 American consul George Seward signed an agreement with the head of Shanghai County Huang Fang (黃芳) to create the American Concession in Shanghai, which also confirmed the boundary of area.[1] On 21 September 1863, the American area was merged with the British as the Shanghai International Settlement.

See also

References

  1. ^ "虹口区志>>第一编境域·建置>>第一章境域>>第一节境域变迁" (in Chinese). Shanghai Office for Local Chronicles. Retrieved 2019-07-28.