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The American Cordillera is a chain of mountain ranges (cordilleras) that consists of an almost continuous sequence of mountain ranges that form the western "backbone" of North America, Central America and South America, with Aconcagua as the highest peak of the chain.[1] It is also the backbone of the volcanic arc that forms the eastern half of the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Description

North America

Main article: North American Cordillera

The ranges of the Cordillera from Mexico northwards are collectively called the North American Cordillera.

From north to south, this sequence of overlapping and parallel ranges begins with the Alaska Range and the Brooks Range in Alaska and runs through the Yukon into British Columbia. The main belt of the Rocky Mountains along with the parallel Columbia Mountains and Coast Ranges of mountains and islands continue through British Columbia and Vancouver Island. In the United States, the Cordillera branches include the Rockies, the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, and various small Pacific coastal ranges. In Mexico, the Cordillera continues through the Sierra Madre Occidental and Sierra Madre Oriental, as well as the backbone mountains of the Baja California peninsula.

The Cordillera continues on through the mountain ranges of Central America in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, and becomes the Andes Mountains of South America.

South America and Antarctica

The Cordillera, having continued through Central America, continues on through South America and even to the Antarctic. In South America the Cordillera is known as the Andes Mountains. The Andes with their parallel chains and the island chains off the coast of Chile continue through Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and Chile to the southernmost tip of South America at Tierra del Fuego. The Cordillera continues along the Scotia Arc before reaching the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Historical Geology Notes - The Breakup of Pangea and Deformation in the Western Cordillera". Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus faculty website. Archived from the original on October 1, 2011. Retrieved June 25, 2011.
  2. ^ "The North American Cordillera: A Color Shaded-Relief Map in Oblique Mercator Projection About the Pacific-North America Pole of Rotation, Scale Circa 1:5,000,000". pubs.usgs.gov. Retrieved April 26, 2017.

Further reading