American Ninja Warrior
American Ninja Warrior Logo.jpg
GenreReality TV
Based onSasuke by Ushio Higuchi
Directed by
  • Jay Hunter
  • Patrick McManus[1]
Presented by
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of seasons14
No. of episodes211[2]
Production
Executive producers
Camera setupMultiple-camera
Running time36–128 minutes
Production companies
DistributorNBCUniversal Television and Streaming
Release
Original network
Picture formatNTSC (season 1)
HDTV 1080i (season 2-present)
Audio format5.1 Surround
Original releaseDecember 12, 2009 (2009-12-12) –
present (present)
Chronology
Preceded byAmerican Ninja Challenge
Related showsSasuke
Ultimate Beastmaster

American Ninja Warrior (sometimes abbreviated as ANW) is an American sports entertainment reality show based on the Japanese television reality show Sasuke. It features thousands of competitors attempting to complete series of obstacle courses of increasing difficulty in various cities across the United States, in hopes of advancing to the national finals on the Las Vegas Strip and becoming the season's "American Ninja Warrior."

To date, only Geoff Britten, Isaac Caldiero, and Drew Drechsel have conquered Mount Midoriyama and achieved Total Victory. Caldiero and Drechsel are the only competitors to win the cash prize of $1,000,000. Britten was awarded the title of "First American Ninja Warrior" for being the first to complete all six courses (city qualifying, city finals, and four stages of Mount Midoriyama) in a single season. The series premiered on December 12, 2009, on cable channel G4, and now airs on NBC.

History

An American Ninja Challenge competitor in a Batman costume
An American Ninja Challenge competitor in a Batman costume
Season Duration Episodes National Finals Specials Presenters
Premiere Finale USA vs. The World All Stars Celebrity Ninja Warrior Women's Championship Family Championship Winner's prize Last Ninja
Standing prize
Venue Last Ninja Standing/
American Ninja Warrior(s)
Result USA vs. The World All Stars Celebrity Ninja Warrior Women's Championship Family Championship Co-
Commentator
Co-
Commentator
Sideline
reporter
1 December 12, 2009 December 19, 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 8 None None Japan (Sasuke 23) Levi Meeuwenberg Failed Stage 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Blair Herter Alison Haislip None
2 December 8, 2010 December 23, 2010 10 $250,000 Japan (Sasuke 26) David Campbell Matt Iseman Jimmy Smith Alison Haislip
3 July 31, 2011 August 21, 2011 10 $500,000 Japan (Sasuke 27)
4 May 20, 2012 July 23, 2012 24 Las Vegas Strip (Mount Midoriyama) Brent Steffensen Jonny Moseley Angela Sun
5 June 30, 2013 September 16, 2013 January 13, 2014 22 Brian Arnold Team USA Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Jenn Brown
6 May 26, 2014 September 8, 2014 September 15, 2014 15 Joe Moravsky Team Europe
7 May 25, 2015 September 14, 2015 January 31, 2016 May 29, 2016 18 $1,000,000 Geoff Britten Isaac Caldiero Achieved Total Victory[a] Team USA Team Akbar Kristine Leahy
8 June 1, 2016 September 12, 2016 June 4, 2017 February 20, 2017 15 Drew Drechsel Failed Stage 3 Team Kristine
9 June 12, 2017 September 18, 2017 March 11, 2018 May 17, 2018 May 25, 2017 18 Joe Moravsky Team Europe $205,000
10 May 30, 2018 September 10, 2018 January 27, 2019 May 26, 2019 May 24, 2018 18 $100,000 Drew Drechsel Team USA Team Matt $185,000
11 May 29, 2019 September 16, 2019 January 26, 2020 August 31, 2020 N/A 18 Drew Drechsel Achieved Total Victory Team Australia N/A Zuri Hall
12 September 7, 2020 November 6, 2020 N/A N/A May 9, 2021 9 $100,000 None St. Louis (Finals) Daniel Gil Won Power Tower Playoff N/A N/A Meagan Martin
13 May 31, 2021 September 13, 2021 May 30, 2022 May 8, 2022 September 5, 2022 15 $1,000,000 $100,000 Las Vegas Strip (Mount Midoriyama) Kaden Lebsack Failed Stage 4 None Jesse Labreck Auer Family
14 June 6, 2022 August 29, 2022 TBD TBD TBD 12 TBD TBD TBD
  Indicates competitor who achieved Total Victory and became the champion.
  Indicates competitor who achieved Total Victory and became the runner-up.
  Indicates Team USA and Team Matt.
  Indicates Team Europe.
  Indicates Team Australia.
  Indicates Team Akbar.
  Indicates Team Kristine.

Presenters

The broadcast position for host Matt Iseman and co-host Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, seen here in the eighth season alongside a city course
The broadcast position for host Matt Iseman and co-host Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, seen here in the eighth season alongside a city course

During each episode, the play-by-play announcer and color commentator provide play-by-play on a competitor's run on the course while the sideline reporter introduces the obstacles during the beginning of the episode and interviews competitors.[9]

American Ninja Warrior was originally hosted by G4's Blair Herter and Alison Haislip.[10]

In the second season, comedian and television host Matt Iseman joined the show, replacing Herter. Producers were fond of his knowledge of sports and lighthearted, enthusiastic delivery.[6][11] Additionally, MMA fighter Jimmy Smith was brought in as co-host while Haislip was assigned to the new sideline reporter position.[6][12] The panel remained the same throughout season three.[13]

For season four, Olympic medalist Jonny Moseley was brought in as the new color commentator, replacing Smith. Producers believed his experience as a freestyle skier would bring a unique perspective to the series. Meanwhile, sportscaster and television presenter Angela Sun replaced Haislip.[9]

For season five, two newcomers were introduced. Sports analyst and former NFL player Akbar Gbaja-Biamila replaced Moseley, while ESPN sportscaster and model Jenn Brown replaced Sun as sideline reporter.[14] Gbaja-Biamila was contacted to audition for the role of co-host in Los Angeles after being seen on the NFL Network by one of the series' executive producers.[15] The season five panel remained the same through the sixth season.

For season seven, CBS Sports reporter Kristine Leahy joined the show as the new sideline reporter, replacing Brown, and remained on the show through season 10.[16]

Iseman and Gbaja-Biamila returned to host the eleventh season along with new sideline reporter Zuri Hall.[17] For season 12, the panel remained the same, as it will for the thirteenth season.

Format

Contestant eligibility

Before being eligible to compete, all contestants must first meet a number of requirements. Some of the requirements are; (1). Contestants must be legal residents of the United States. (2). Contestants must be in good health and capable of participating in strenuous athletic activities.[18] (3). There is no maximum age limit, but contestants must be at least 19 years of age to apply (21 years old during the first nine seasons). Starting in Season 13 the producers asked specific teens ages 15–18 to submit a video to be on the show. (4). Contestants must fill out a 20-question questionnaire and make a video about themselves.[19] Video length requirements have varied from two to eight minutes, depending on the season. (It is currently two to three minutes).[18]

About 1,000 people applied to compete in the first season,[20] 3,500 in the fifth season,[21] 5,000 in the sixth season,[22] 50,000 in the seventh season,[20] 70,000 in the eighth season,[23] and 77,000 in the ninth season.[24] Producers then select 100 contestants from the thousands of applicants to participate in each regional qualifier. Until Season 11, applicants could also camp outside a qualifying course and wait days or weeks to be one of the 10-30 participants selected as "walk-ons."[20] Beginning in Season 11, a lottery system was instituted to randomly select 15-20 'walk-ons' per qualifier location. [25]

City Qualifying and Finals

City Qualifying and Finals courses are filmed back-to-back, usually over two nights.[26]

City Qualifying

Indianapolis city qualifying entrance during the eighth season
Indianapolis city qualifying entrance during the eighth season

In each city qualifying course, the competitors that the producers have selected compete on an obstacle course consisting of six obstacles.

At the beginning of each run, a buzzer sounds off and a timer begins, allowing a competitor to start the course. The first obstacle on any city qualifying course is the Quintuple Steps, Quad Steps, Floating Steps, or Shrinking Steps which competitors must run across. This is followed by four different obstacles that test a competitor's balance, upper-body strength, and grip. These five obstacles are built above water (although the balance obstacles were built above a safety mat until season 8). If a competitor falls into the water or touches it, their run ends immediately and the timer records their time.

In the first seven seasons, the sixth and final obstacle was the 14-foot Warped Wall, in which competitors were given three chances to reach the top. In the eighth and ninth seasons, the wall was 14'6". In the tenth season, the 18-foot "Mega Wall" was introduced adjacent to the Warped Wall. Competitors had only one attempt to reach the top of the Mega Wall and, if successful, they won $10,000. In the eleventh season, competitors choosing the Mega Wall who failed on their first attempt could earn $5,000 on their second attempt and $2,500 on their third if they were successful on, respectively, their second or third attempts. Competitors are given the choice of which to climb.

At the top of both walls, a competitor presses a buzzer that stops the timer and records their time, ending their run on the course. The top 30 competitors who go the farthest in the least time advance to the city finals course. Since the fifth season, competitors who complete the city qualifiers automatically move on to the city finals. Since the ninth season, the top five women also advance to the city finals, even if they have not finished in the top 30.[27]

City finals

City finals courses are the follow-up to each city qualifying course. They contain four new obstacles in addition to the six obstacles featured in the city qualifying course. These four obstacles are all placed after the original six obstacles. In the tenth season, two of the original six obstacles are replaced with new obstacles for the city finals course, but this was dropped in season eleven.

The top 15 or 12 competitors who go the farthest in the least time from each city finals course move on to compete on the National Finals course. Since the fifth season, competitors who complete the city finals automatically move on to the National Finals. Since the ninth season, the top two women in each city finals course also move on to compete on the National Finals course, even if they do not finish in the top 15 or 12. Previously, many women had been granted "wildcard" slots, which allowed them to advance to the National Finals.[27] Since the eighth season, small prizes ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 are awarded to first, second, and third finishers who complete the city finals course.[28]

In the first three seasons, there was a semi-finals course in between the city finals and the National Finals courses, where the top 15 competitors from the city finals course were narrowed down to 10 and then sent to Japan to compete on Sasuke.[10] In the second and third seasons, this was referred to as "boot camp" and took place at a summer camp in Simi Valley, California.[6][29] During this time, competitors trained together for multiple days and took part in pressure challenges.[12][13] With the expansion of the series in its fourth season, there was no longer a need to narrow down competitors to 10, as they were no longer being sent to Japan, and this semi-finals course was removed.[5]

City timeline

Location Season
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Greater
Los Angeles, CA
Venice Beach
San Pedro Military venue
Universal City
Las Vegas, NV National Finals venue National Finals venue
Miami, FL
Dallas, TX
Denver, CO
Baltimore, MD
St. Louis, MO Finals venue
Kansas City, MO
Houston, TX
Orlando, FL
Pittsburgh, PA
Atlanta, GA
Indianapolis, IN
Oklahoma City, OK
Philadelphia, PA
San Antonio, TX
Daytona Beach, FL
Cleveland, OH
Minneapolis, MN
Seattle/Tacoma, WA
Cincinnati, OH

Obstacles

The final obstacle of all city qualifying courses, the Warped Wall, seen here in Indianapolis when the course was curved around Monument Circle
The final obstacle of all city qualifying courses, the Warped Wall, seen here in Indianapolis when the course was curved around Monument Circle

Obstacles are designed and produced in the five months prior to an episode taping. In the fourth season, each location contained one or two obstacles that differed between other locations. Since the fifth season, three to five obstacles have differed. In the eighth season, 18 obstacles were debuted.[26][30] In the tenth season, the show's first underwater obstacle was introduced during Stage 2 of the National Finals.[31]

Beginning with the ninth season, fans of the show have been given the opportunity to design their own obstacles through the ANW Obstacle Design Challenge. Seven fan-submitted obstacles have been featured on the series thus far.

National Finals

In the first three seasons, the top 10 ANW competitors advanced to a Sasuke finals course in Japan. Since season four (except for season twelve), ANW has had a finals course on the Las Vegas Strip known as "Mount Midoriyama." The National Finals course consists of four stages, each containing obstacles of increasing difficulty. The course is about the same size as four football fields[30] and contains 23 obstacles.

Stage 1 consists of eight obstacles, which test the competitors' agility and speed. The first stage is timed, and only the competitors who successfully complete it within 2:35 advance to Stage 2.

Stage 2 contains six obstacles that test competitors' strength and speed. Competitors must complete the course within a time limit in order to advance to Stage 3. The time limit through the first nine seasons was 4:00.[32] In the tenth season, the time limit was increased by 30 seconds.[31]

Stage 3 consists of eight obstacles that test competitors' upper body and grip strength.[31] It is the only stage in the National Finals that has no time limit. Like Stages 1 and 2, only the competitors who successfully complete Stage 3 move on to compete on Stage 4. Starting in Season 10, Stage 3 has a clock that counts up to determine any tiebreaking times should no contestant advance from Stage 3, since the format guarantees prize money to the contestant that advances the furthest on the course, and the tiebreaker is based on how fast the contestants reached the previous obstacle prior to failing.

Stage 4 contains the final obstacle of the National Finals courses—a rope climb. Competitors must complete this rope climb in :30 or less in order to be crowned as "American Ninja Warrior." The rope climb's height was 50 feet from the first through third seasons,[33] and was increased to 65 feet in the fourth season.[34] It has been increased since to 75 feet.[8]

Prize money

Aside from the first season, if a competitor completes all four stages of the National Finals, they receive a cash prize. In the second season, the prize money was $250,000.[4] In the third season, the prize was an endorsement deal with K-Swiss worth $500,000 and to become the face of a national advertisement campaign for the company as well as G4.[13] In the fourth, fifth, and sixth seasons, the cash prize was $500,000.[6] From the seventh to eleventh season, the cash prize has been $1,000,000.[35]

From the second through seventh seasons, the fastest competitor to beat the final stage would receive the full prize money, regardless of whether other competitors completed Stage 4 as well. Beginning with the eighth season, if multiple competitors completed Stage 4, the competitors split the prize money.[28]

Starting in the tenth season, a guaranteed $100,000 cash prize is offered, without regard of a player finishing all four stages. The player who advances the furthest on the course in the fastest time is declared the "Last Ninja Standing," and wins the prize. If any competitor finishes all four stages, the prize money is augmented to $1,000,000. If one competitor finishes Stage 4, he wins the entirety of the augmented prize. If multiple competitors completed Stage 4, the prize money is split among competitors that finished Stage 4, with the fastest competitor still declared the overall champion.[31]

Season synopses

2009–2011

The first season of American Ninja Warrior began production in July 2009.[3] The season premiered on December 12, 2009, on G4, and concluded on December 19, 2009. It consisted of eight half-hour episodes. The qualifying round took place in Venice Beach, where a tryout was opened, meaning, competitors from across the United States had to fly themselves there to compete.[10] Levi Meeuwenberg was the Last Man Standing, having gone the farthest in the least time among the American competitors on Sasuke 23.[6]

The second season premiered on December 8, 2010, on G4, and concluded on December 23, 2010, after 10 hour-long episodes.[2] Qualifiers were held in Venice Beach in August.[4] Out of the 10 competitors sent to Japan to compete on Sasuke 26, five completed Stage 1, four completed Stage 2, while none completed Stage 3.[29] David Campbell was the Last Man Standing, having been the American gone the farthest in the least time on Stage 3.[6]

The third season had the same format as the second season but aired in the summer. Qualifiers were held in Venice Beach in May.[36] It premiered on July 31, 2011, on G4, and concluded on August 21, 2011.[2] The finale was aired again on August 22, 2011, as a two-hour primetime special on NBC.[29] In addition to the 10 Americans sent to compete on Sasuke, one fan of ANW got the chance to compete as well. This was the result of an eBay auction in which proceeds were sent to the American Red Cross to help with recovery efforts following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan.[9] During Sasuke 27, four of the six competitors who reached Stage 3 were American—a new record. Previously, only one American would reach Stage 3 per Sasuke competition.[37][38] David Campbell was again the Last Man Standing, having gone the farthest in the least time among the American competitors on Stage 3.[6]

2012–2015

Filming at the entrance of the Venice, Los Angeles course during the fourth season
Filming at the entrance of the Venice, Los Angeles course during the fourth season

The fourth season was notable for differentiating American Ninja Warrior from Sasuke and began what is known as "the modern era" of the series.[6] Following the ratings success of the third season's NBC primetime special, the fourth season aired on both G4 and NBC.[6][38] It premiered on May 20, 2012, on G4, and concluded on July 23, 2012, on NBC. Regional qualifier courses were aired on G4, while the regional finals courses aired on NBC.[9][39] With an increased production budget,[6] preliminary rounds were held in three locations across the United States. Six regional competitions (Southwest, Midwest, Northeast, Northwest, Midsouth, and Southeast) took place in Venice Beach, Dallas, and Miami.[38] During the National Finals, which were held for the first time in the United States,[6][9] Brent Steffensen was the only competitor to reach Stage 3 and became the Last Man Standing.[6] He went further on Stage 3 than any American had ever gone before—including on Sasuke.[30]

The fifth season premiered on June 30, 2013, on G4, and concluded on September 16, 2013, on NBC. City qualifiers and finals courses aired on both G4 and NBC.[39] City competitions were held in four locations: Venice Beach, Baltimore, Miami, and Denver.[40] In the Venice Beach qualifier, Jessie Graff became the first woman to qualify for a city finals course.[27] During the National Finals, 41-year-old Joyce Shahboz became the first woman to compete there twice in two years (as a wild card),[21] while Brian Arnold fell on the final obstacle of Stage 3 and won the title of Last Man Standing.[35]

The sixth season premiered on May 26, 2014, and concluded on September 8, 2014, with original episodes airing solely on NBC. City competitions were held in Venice Beach, Dallas, St. Louis, Miami, and Denver.[39] In the Dallas qualifier, Kacy Catanzaro became the first female competitor to make it up the Warped Wall. Later in the Dallas finals, she became the first woman to complete a city finals course. Catanzaro's two runs have been described as the first "viral moment" of the show and are credited with increasing the seventh season's submissions ten times over.[35][41] During the National Finals, Joe Moravsky fell on the antepenultimate obstacle of Stage 3[42] and became the sixth season's Last Man Standing.[35]

The seventh season premiered on May 25, 2015, and ended on September 14, 2015.[39] City competitions were held in six locations, including two in Los Angeles. In addition to Venice Beach, a special military edition was held in San Pedro for competitors who are either current or former members of the U.S. Armed Forces. City competitions were also held in Kansas City, Houston, Orlando, and Pittsburgh.[43][44] During the National Finals, a record of 38 competitors completed Stage 1, and 8 athletes completed Stage 2, and both Isaac Caldiero and Geoff Britten completed Stage 3, marking the first time any competitor(s) completed it in the regular season.[35] During Stage 4, Britten completed the rope climb in 0:29.65 seconds, earning the title of "First American Ninja Warrior"[8] for being the first to complete all six courses (city qualifying, city finals, and four stages of Mount Midoriyama) in a single season,[45] and Caldiero completed the rope climb in 0:26.14 seconds, earning the title of "Second American Ninja Warrior" and the $1,000,000 prize due to him having the fastest time.

2016–2019

The Fly Wheels, the third obstacle on the Indianapolis city course in the eighth season
The Fly Wheels, the third obstacle on the Indianapolis city course in the eighth season

The eighth season of the series began on June 1, 2016, and concluded on September 12, 2016.[39] The eighth season marked a 40 percent increase in the number of female submission videos from the previous season. City competitions were held in Los Angeles, Atlanta, Indianapolis, Oklahoma City, and Philadelphia. During the Philadelphia finals, no competitor completed the course—a first in the series' history. In Stage 1 of the National Finals, many veterans of the show, including Ryan Stratis, Brent Steffensen, Travis Rosen, James McGrath, Jamie Rahn, Mike Bernardo, Kevin Bull, Ian Dory, Jojo Bynum, and Geoff Britten, did not complete the course. As a result, only 17 competitors advanced to Stage 2—the lowest in the series' history. However, Jessie Graff became the first woman to complete Stage 1, placing fifth.[46][47] Only two athletes: Drew Drechsel and Daniel Gil, managed to beat Stage 2, but none of them completed Stage 3. Daniel Gil fell on the Ultimate Cliffhanger, while Drew fell further on the Hang Climb, and was declared the Last Man Standing.[27]

The ninth season premiered on June 12, 2017, and ended on September 18, 2017. City competitions were held in Los Angeles, San Antonio, Daytona Beach, Kansas City, Cleveland, and Denver.[39] A record of 41 competitors successfully completed Stage 1 during the National Finals, including David Campbell, Ryan Stratis, Drew Drechsel, and Allyssa Beird, who became just the second woman to complete it.[46] Stage 2 saw every competitor eliminated except Joe Moravsky, Sean Bryan, and Najee Richardson. However, none of them could complete Stage 3. Bryan and Richardson fell on the Ultimate Cliffhanger, while Moravsky fell on the penultimate obstacle and became the Last Man Standing.[27][32]

The tenth season began airing on May 30, 2018, and ended on September 10, 2018. City competitions were held in Los Angeles, Dallas, Miami, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis.[39] In one episode, they did a Jurassic World night and showed a sneak peek of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Drew Drechsel and Sean Bryan—the two competitors to reach Stage 3 of the National Finals—both fell during their runs. However, Drechsel fell at a faster time than Bryan, crowning him the Last Ninja Standing. As the result of a format change introduced this season, Drechsel was also the first Last Ninja Standing to win $100,000 for being the competitor who went the farthest in the least time on the National Finals course but did not complete Stage 4.[31][48]

The eleventh season started its premiere on May 29, 2019, and ended on September 16, 2019.[49] City competitions were held in Los Angeles, Atlanta, Oklahoma City, Seattle/Tacoma, marking the first time that a course was held in the Pacific Northwest, Baltimore, and Cincinnati. In one episode, they did Angry Birds obstacles in honor of Angry Birds Movie 2. New rules regarding the Mega Wall obstacle, which was introduced in the previous season, came into effect. Competitors were given three chances to make it up the wall, but the prize money decreased after each attempt, starting at $10,000, then decreasing to $5,000, and finally $2,500. This season also introduced the Power Tower, where the top two finishers from each city qualifying would race on a giant metal structure to gain the "Speed Pass", which guaranteed them a spot in the National Finals. In City Finals, the Power Tower was modified, and the top two finishers would race for the "Safety Pass", which allowed them to rerun the course in either one of the first two stages (Stage 1 or Stage 2) if they fail. During the National Finals, 28 of the 86 finalists completed Stage 1, and a record 21 astounding athletes completed Stage 2, and both Drew Drechsel and Daniel Gil completed Stage 3. Daniel Gil was not able to complete the rope climb on Stage 4 in the 30-second time limit, but Drew Drechsel was able to climb it in 0:27.46 seconds, earning him the title of "Third American Ninja Warrior" and the $1,000,000 prize.

2020–present

On January 22, 2020, the series was renewed for a twelfth season, which premiered on September 7, 2020. For the first time, a Spanish-language version airs on Telemundo. Qualifying cities originally included returns to Los Angeles and St. Louis with a new location, Washington, D.C., with the National Finals initially set to be held again held in Las Vegas.[50] Production of the season was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic with filming interrupted in the middle of production on the show, just a day before it was set to begin.[51][52] On August 12, 2020, it was announced that the season would premiere on September 7. The season, consisting of eight episodes, was filmed at The Dome at America's Center in St. Louis, Missouri; ANW was the first NBC series to have completed a full season of episodes during the current pandemic.[53]

The thirteenth season consists of 12 episodes aired from May 31 to September 13, 2021. The official age limit was 19, but it was revealed that 35 competitors between the ages of 15 and 18 were invited to compete. The season had 12 episodes, and a season format more similar to that of the fourth to eleventh seasons. There were 5 qualifying episodes, all of which were taped in the Tacoma Dome in Seattle/Tacoma, Washington. The top 30 competitors and top 5 women from each episode advanced to the semifinals. There were 4 semifinals episodes, all of which were filmed in the Universal Studios backlot in Los Angeles, California. In the semifinals, the Power Tower returned, and the two competitors who finished their semifinals course the fastest would compete on it for the Safety Pass. Those who won the Safety Pass were granted the advantage of being able to retry Stage 1 or Stage 2 if they fell on it. The four competitors who won the Safety Passes were Brian Burkhardt, Joe Moravsky, Vance Walker, and Austin Gray. The top 15 competitors and top 3 women from each semifinal episode would advance to the National Finals, which returned to Las Vegas, Nevada after not being held there the previous season due to the emerging COVID-19 pandemic. As with all of the seasons before the previous, competitors had to complete all of the obstacles of a stage on the first try in order to move on to the next stage, unless they won a Safety Pass. 68 competitors reached the National Finals, including 18 of the original 35 ninjas under 19 years old. 27 competitors completed Stage 1 and advanced to Stage 2, but Joe Moravsky had to use his Safety Pass to move on after missing the moving ring on the High Road. Another notable competitor to advance was Jesse Labreck, who, after failing the final obstacle 3 times in a row before season 12, became the first woman to advance to Stage 2 since Allyssa Beird in 2017, and only the third woman to advance to Stage 2 in the show's history. Only 4 of the 27 competitors completed Stage 2 and advanced to Stage 3: Vance Walker, Austin Gray, Kyle Soderman, and Kaden Lebsack. Brian Burkhardt failed the Double Salmon Ladder, used his Safety Pass, and then failed on the Epic Air Surfer. Vance Walker also failed the Double Salmon Ladder and used his Safety Pass, but he was able to then complete the stage. Austin Gray was the only competitor of the season to have a Safety Pass and not use it. On Stage 3, Kyle Soderman failed on the Ultimate Cliffhanger, and Vance Walker and Austin Gray failed on the Eyeglass Alley. Kaden Lebsack was the only competitor to finish Stage 3, and the fifth competitor to finish Stage 3 in the show's history, after Isaac Caldiero, Geoff Britten, Drew Drechsel, and Daniel Gil. But on Stage 4, Lebsack timed out about 65 feet up. In Season 13, no ninja was able to defeat Mount Midoriyama, but by going the furthest the fastest, Kaden Lebsack was declared the Last Ninja Standing and granted $100,000.

The fourteenth season premiered on June 6, 2022. The season format is similar to the previous season, but the filming of 5 qualifying episodes was moved to a studio in San Antonio, Texas, with the 4 semifinals will be taped in Universal City, Los Angeles. The top 30 competitors and the top 5 women from each qualifiers advance to semifinals. The top 15 competitors and the top 3 women from each semifinals will advance to National Finals on Mount Midoriyama. The age limit was lowered once again to 15 years.

Special episodes

USA vs. The World

Main article: American Ninja Warrior: USA vs. The World

Special Air date Champions Runner-up 3rd Place 4th Place Commentators Sideline reporter
1 USA vs. Japan January 13, 2014 Team USA Team Japan Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Jenn Brown
2 USA vs. The World September 15, 2014 Team Europe Team USA Team Japan
3 January 31, 2016 Team USA Team Europe Kristine Leahy
4 June 4, 2017 Team Latin America
5 March 11, 2018 Team Europe Team USA Team Asia
6 January 27, 2019 Team USA Team Australia Team Europe
7 January 26, 2020 Team Australia Team USA Zuri Hall

NBC has aired a series of seven international competitions in which an American Ninja Warrior team from the USA compete against teams from other countries around the world, including Japan, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Australia for bragging rights and the American Ninja Warrior: USA vs. The World trophy. The competitors race on the same Mount Midoriyama course used in the National Finals on the Las Vegas Strip.

All of the international competitions have been hosted by Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila. The first two included sideline reporter Jenn Brown. The next four included Kristine Leahy as the sideline reporter. The seventh included Zuri Hall as the sideline reporter.

The first international showdown was called USA vs. Japan, while the rest were named USA vs. The World. The first global competition aired on January 13, 2014, and was won by Team USA. The second global competition aired on September 15, 2014, and was won by Team Europe. The third global competition aired on January 31, 2016, and was won by Team USA. The fourth global competition was aired on June 4, 2017, and was again won by Team USA. The fifth global competition aired on March 11, 2018, and was won by Team Europe. The sixth global competition aired on January 27, 2019. For the first time, each team had at least one female competitor. It was won by Team USA. The seventh global competition aired on January 26, 2020, and was won by Team Australia.

All-Stars

2016

On May 29, 2016, prior to the premiere of season eight, NBC aired a two-hour all-stars special in which hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams composed of three veterans, one rookie, and one woman. Teams competed on Stages 2, 3, and 4 of the regular season finals course, Mt. Midoriyama, as well as competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills in competitions on the Giant Pegboard, Supersonic Shelf Grab, Super Salmon Ladder, and Giant Jump Hang, concluding with a race to the top of the Mega Wall.

Team Competition

Rosters

Team Matt
Joe Moravsky Lance Pekus JJ Woods Grant McCartney Jessie Graff
Team Akbar
Flip Rodriguez Brent Steffensen Jamie Rahn Daniel Gil Meagan Martin
Team Matt   Team Akbar  
  • Joe Moravsky ("The Weatherman") - 26, Sherman, CT - Completed Stage 2 three straight years
  • Lance Pekus ("Cowboy Ninja") - 28, Salmon, ID - Fastest time in Kansas City Finals
  • JJ Woods - 28, Miami, FL - Reached Stage 2 past two seasons
  • Grant McCartney ("Island Ninja") - 27, Honolulu, HI - Reached Stage 2 in rookie season
  • Jessie Graff ("Wonder Woman") - 31, Calabasas, CA - Only woman to qualify for Vegas Finals ANW 7
  • Flip Rodriguez ("Young Flip") - 26, Miami, FL - 4-time Mount Midoriyama finalist
  • Brent Steffensen - 35, San Antonio, TX - 5-time Mount Midoriyama finalist
  • Jamie Rahn ("Captain NBC") - 27, Barrington, NJ - 3-time Vegas finalist
  • Daniel Gil ("Kingdom Ninja") - 22, Houston, TX - Fastest time in Houston Qualifying
  • Meagan Martin - 25, Boulder, CO - Scaled Warped Wall two years in a row

Overview

Obstacles
Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4
Rope Jungle Psycho Chainsaw 75-foot rope climb
Double Salmon Ladder Doorknob Grasper
Unstable Bridge Floating Boards
Butterfly Wall Ultimate Cliffhanger
Roulette Row Pole Grasper
Wall Lift Hang Climb
Area 51
Flying Bar

Results

Stage 2

Both Joe Moravsky and Lance Pekus completed Stage 2 for Team Matt, with Daniel Gil also completing it for Team Akbar. Moravsky finished in a record time of 1:08.52.

Leaderboard

Order Finalist Result Notes
1 Joe Moravsky Completed 1:08.52 (previously 2nd - 1:23.69 in USA vs. The World and 4th - 2:10.59 in the National Finals)
2 Sean McColl Completed 1:19.86
3 Drew Drechsel Completed 1:34.46 (previously 6th - 2:13.48 in the National Finals)
4 Geoff Britten Completed 2:01.89
5 Kevin Bull Completed 2:02.10
6 Isaac Caldiero Completed 2:05.80
7 Jeremiah Morgan Completed 2:12.23
8 Ian Dory Completed 2:17.03
9 Abel Gonzalez Completed 2:21.56
10 Lance Pekus Completed N/A
11 Daniel Gil Completed N/A

Stage 3

Both Meagan Martin from Team Akbar and Jessie Graff from Team Matt made history as the first two women to attempt Stage 3, and they both made it to the Ultimate Cliffhanger.

Stage 4

It was Lance Pekus of Team Matt vs. Flip Rodriguez of Team Akbar. Rodriguez won the competition for Team Akbar with a time of 0:30.23, making this the POM Wonderful "Run of the Night".

Leaderboard

Order Finalist Outcome Result
1 Isaac Caldiero Total Victory 0:26.14
2 Geoff Britten Total Victory 0:29.65
3 Flip Rodriguez Completed 0:30.23
4 Lance Pekus Completed N/A

Final Score: Team Akbar: 5, Team Matt: 3

Champions: Team Akbar

Skills Competition

2017

On February 20, 2017, NBC aired a second two-hour all-stars special. Like the previous year's competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams, this year composed of one veteran, one breakout star, and one woman. Team Matt featured Chris Wilczewski, Najee Richardson, and Jesse "Flex" Lebreck. Team Akbar featured Grant McCartney, Neil "Crazy" Craver, and Meagan Martin. Sideline interviewer Kristine Leahy picked her team, which consisted of Jessie Graff, Flip Rodriguez, and Nicholas Coolridge. Teams competed in a relay race to finish sections of Stages 1, 2, and 3 of the regular season finals course, Mt. Midoriyama. Next came the skills competition on a supersized course, where contestants tested their skills in competition on the 75-feet tall Endless Invisible Climb, the 4-story high Super Salmon Ladder, Striding Steps, Big Air Grab, Mega Wall, now 20 feet high, Thunderbolt, and Supersonic Shelf Grab.

Team Competition

Rosters

Team Matt
Chris Wilczewski Najee Richardson Jesse Labreck
Team Akbar
Grant McCartney Neil Craver Meagan Martin
Team Kristine
Flip Rodriguez Nicholas Coolridge Jessie Graff
Team Matt   Team Akbar   Team Kristine  
  • Chris Wilczewski ("The Boss") - 27, Mount Laurel, NJ - Gym Owner, 7-time ANW veteran
  • Najee Richardson ("The Phoenix") - 25, Philadelphia, PA - Fitness Coach; Made it to Stage 2 in Season 8
  • Jesse Labreck ("Flex") - 26, Waban, MA - Caregiver, top female ANW rookie this season
  • Grant McCartney ("Island Ninja") - 28, Honolulu, HI - Flight Attendant; Reached Stage 2 past two seasons
  • Neil Craver ("Crazy Craver") - 35, Winston-Salem, NC - Photographer; Reached Stage 2 past two seasons
  • Meagan Martin - 26, Boulder, CO - Climbing Coach, one of the three women to qualify for the National Finals this past season
  • Flip Rodriguez ("Young Flip") - 27, Los Angeles, CA - Stuntman, one of the fastest competitors in ANW history
  • Nicholas Coolridge ("Modern Tarzan") - 27, Venice, CA - Acrobat, ANW fan favorite
  • Jessie Graff ("Wonder Woman") - 32, Calabasas, CA - Stuntwoman, first woman to finish Stage 1 in ANW history

Overview

Obstacles
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3
Snake Run Giant Ring Swing Keylock Hang
Propeller Bar Down Up Salmon Ladder Floating Boards
Giant Log Grip Wave Runner Ultimate Cliffhanger
Jumping Spider Butterfly Wall Curved Body Prop
Sonic Curve Double Wedge Hang Climb
Warped Wall Wall Flip Walking Bar
Broken Bridge Flying Bar
Flying Squirrel + Final Climb

Results

Stage 1

Team Kristine gets the fastest time of the season with a time of 1:18.78, beating Team Akbar's time of 1:25.42. Despite flying through the first four obstacles, Team Matt failed on Sonic Curve and could not post a time.

Leaderboard

Order Finalist Outcome Result
1 Flip Rodriguez (previously 13th - 2:15.22 in the National Finals), Nicholas Coolridge (previously 8th - 2:11.64 in the National Finals), Jessie Graff (previously 5th - 2:07.61 in the National Finals) (Team Kristine  ) Completed 1:18.78
2 Grant McCartney (previously 12th - 2:15.19 in the National Finals)  , Neil Craver (previously 6th - 2:08.97 in the National Finals)  , Meagan Martin   (Team Akbar  ) Completed 1:25.42
3 Jake Murray Completed 1:45.25
4 Thomas Stillings Completed 1:52.44
5 Daniel Gil Completed 2:04.97
6 Brian Arnold Completed 2:05.90
7 Drew Drechsel Completed 2:11.22
8 Chris Wilczewski Completed 2:11.78
9 Najee Richardson Completed 2:11.99
10 Josh Levin Completed 2:12.24
11 Adam Rayl Completed 2:15.26
12 Joe Moravsky Completed 2:15.90
13 Ethan Swanson Completed 2:17.90
14 Michael Torres Completed 2:19.92

Stage 2

Both Jesse Labreck from Team Matt and Meagan Martin from Team Akbar made history as the first two women to get past the Wave Runner. Team Matt failed on the Double Wedge and eliminated Team Akbar, who failed on the Butterfly Wall.

Stage 3

Team Kristine completed Stage 3 in a record time of 5:30:62, making this the POM Wonderful Run of the Night. Team Matt made it all the way to the Hang Climb before failing.

Leaderboard

Order Finalist Outcome Result
1 Jessie Graff, Nicholas Coolridge, Flip Rodriguez (Team Kristine  ) Completed 5:30.62

Champions: Team Kristine

Skills Competition

2018

On May 17, 2018, NBC aired a third two-hour all-stars special. Like the last two seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, along with Kristine Leahy, chose their all-star teams composed of two male veterans and one female veteran. The reigning champs, Team Kristine (gray/pink), featured: Jessie Graff, Flip Rodriguez, and JJ Woods. Team Matt (blue) featured: Jamie Rahn, Lance Pekus, and Jesse Labreck. Team Akbar featured first-time all-stars: Allyssa Beird, Jon Alexis Jr., and Tyler Yamauchi, as well as competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills in competitions, which consisted of climbing the Super Salmon Ladder, 4 stories high in the fastest time, a speed and balance challenge on the Striding Steps, an upper body test on the Thunderbolt, the Wicked Wingnuts, and a new obstacle, the Mega Spider Climb, where eight women all-stars raced side-by-side 80 feet up to the top of the Stage 4 tower.

Skills Competition

Team Competition

Rosters

Team Matt
Jesse Labreck Lance Pekus Jamie Rahn
Team Akbar
Tyler Yamauchi Jon Alexis Jr. Allyssa Beird
Team Kristine
Flip Rodriguez JJ Woods Jessie Graff
Team Matt   Team Akbar   Team Kristine  
  • Jesse Labreck ("Flex") - 27, Naperville, IL - Ninja Coach, one of the strongest ninjas in ANW history
  • Lance Pekus ("Cowboy Ninja") - 30, Salmon, ID - Rancher, 6-time ANW veteran
  • Jamie Rahn ("Captain NBC") - 29, Barrington, NJ - Gym Owner, 7-time ANW veteran
  • Tyler Yamauchi ("Muscle Ball") - 32, Hoffman Estates, IL - Stay-At-Home Dad, one of the shortest competitors at 5'1
  • Jon Alexis Jr. ("The Giant") - 28, Waterville, ME - Electrical Engineer, one of the tallest competitors at 6'6
  • Allyssa Beird - 26, Marlborough, MA - 5th Grade Teacher, second woman to finish Stage 1 in ANW history
  • Flip Rodriguez ("Young Flip") - 28, Los Angeles, CA - Stuntman, 7-time ANW veteran
  • JJ Woods - 30, Miami, FL - Stuntman, 5-time ANW veteran
  • Jessie Graff ("Wonder Woman") - 33, Calabasas, CA - Stuntwoman, first woman to finish Stage 1 in ANW history

Overview

Obstacles
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3
Snake Run Giant Ring Swing Floating Boards
Propeller Bar Criss Cross Salmon Ladder Keylock Hang
Double Dipper Wave Runner Nail Clipper
Jumping Spider Swing Surfer Ultimate Cliffhanger
Parkour Run Wingnut Alley Curved Body Prop
Warped Wall Wall Flip Peg Cloud
Domino Pipes Time Bomb
Flying Squirrel + Final Climb Flying Bar

Results

Stage 1

All three teams completed Stage 1 in record time. Team Matt finished in 1:14.82. Team Akbar finished in 1:26.33. Team Kristine finished in 1:13.83, the fastest time of the season.

Leaderboard

Order Competitor Outcome Result
1 Flip Rodriguez (previously 13th - 2:04.34 in the National Finals), JJ Woods (previously 30th - 2:18.27 in the National Finals), Jessie Graff (Team Kristine  ) Finished 1:13.83
2 Jesse Labreck, Lance Pekus (previously 4th - 1:49.52 in the National Finals), Jamie Rahn (previously 9th - 1:59.77 in the National Finals) (Team Matt  ) Finished 1:14.82
3 Tyler Yamauchi (previously 18th - 2:09.53 in the National Finals), Jon Alexis Jr. (previously 31st - 2:19.40 in the National Finals), Allyssa Beird (previously 36th - 2:26.52 in the National Finals) (Team Akbar  ) Finished 1:26.33
4 Josh Salinas Finished 1:38.54
5 Daniel Gil Finished 1:47.04
6 Drew Drechsel Finished 1:48.44 (previously 1st - 1:33.71 in the National Finals)
7 Hunter Guerard Finished 1:51.16
8 Joe Moravsky Finished 1:52.24
9 Dave Cavanagh Finished 1:56.76
10 Nicholas Coolridge Finished 1:58.18
11 Brent Steffensen Finished 2:01.34
12 Thomas Stillings Finished 2:02.12
13 Sergio Verdasco Finished 2:02.21
14 Matthew Ilgenfritz Finished 2:03.48
15 Kevin Bull Finished 2:07.05
16 Najee Richardson Finished 2:07.39
17 Jody Avila Finished 2:08.18
18 Travis Rosen Finished 2:08.97
19 Mike Bernardo Finished 2:10.10
20 Eric Middleton Finished 2:11.48
21 Cass Clawson Finished 2:12.32
22 David Campbell Finished 2:14.11
23 Adam Rayl Finished 2:14.60
24 Brian Arnold Finished 2:15.15
25 Sean Bryan Finished 2:15.48
26 Michael Silenzi Finished 2:15.56
27 Tyler Gillett Finished 2:15.59
28 Nick Kostreski Finished 2:17.28
29 Abel Gonzalez Finished 2:17.60
30 Josh Levin Finished 2:21.09
31 Karson Voiles Finished 2:21.10
32 Drew Knapp Finished 2:24.28
33 Ryan Stratis Finished 2:25.33
34 Ian Dory Finished 2:27.66
35 Andrew Lowes Finished 2:28.32
36 Grant Clinton Finished 2:28.52
37 Sean Darling-Hammond Finished 2:28.74
38 Nick Hanson Finished 2:29.97
39 Danne Marmolejo Finished 2:53.16
40 Karl Fow Finished N/A

Stage 2

Team Matt completed Stage 2 with a time of 3:12.70, eliminating Team Akbar, who failed on the Swing Surfer.

Leaderboard

Order Competitor Outcome Result
1 Jesse Labreck, Jamie Rahn, Lance Pekus (Team Matt  ) Finished 3:12.70
2 Sean McColl Finished 3:22.80
3 Joe Moravsky Finished 3:35.34
4 Sean Bryan Finished 3:45.94
5 Najee Richardson Finished 3:59.03 (previously 2nd - 3:45.71 in the National Finals)

Stage 3

Both teams completed Stage 3. Team Matt finished in 6:17.96, and Team Kristine finished in 6:12.06, winning the competition for the second year in a row.

Leaderboard

Order Competitor Outcome Result
1 Jessie Graff, Flip Rodriguez, JJ Woods (Team Kristine  ) Finished 6:12.06
2 Lance Pekus, Jamie Rahn, Jesse Labreck (Team Matt  ) Finished 6:17.96

Champions: Team Kristine

2019

The fourth all-stars special aired on May 26, 2019, on NBC, prior to the eleventh season's premiere.[54]

Just like the last three seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, along with Kristine Leahy, chose their all-star teams consisting of two male veterans and one female veteran. Two-time winner Team Kristine (gray/pink), focused on young all-stars: Mathis "Kid" Owhadi, Tyler Gillett, and Barclay Stockett. Team Matt (blue) reached out on the same team that just missed out on winning last season: Jamie Rahn, Lance Pekus, and Jesse "Flex" LaBreck. Team Akbar (red) featured: Grant McCartney, Meagan Martin, and Jake Murray. Next came the skills competition on a supersized course, where contestants tested their skills in competition on the 80-foot tall Mega Spider Climb, Wicked Wingnuts, an upper body test on the Dual Doorknob Drop, a side-by-side race on the Striding Steps, 4-story Super Salmon Ladder, and a fun new obstacle, the Big Dipper Freestyle.

Team Competition

Rosters

Team Matt
Jamie Rahn Jesse Labreck Lance Pekus
Team Akbar
Grant McCartney Meagan Martin Jake Murray
Team Kristine
Mathis Owhadi Tyler Gillett Barclay Stockett
Team Matt   Team Akbar   Team Kristine  
  • Jamie Rahn ("Captain NBC") - 30, 8-time ANW veteran
  • Jesse Labreck ("Flex") - 28, went farther than any other woman in the regular season
  • Lance Pekus ("Cowboy Ninja") - 31, 7-time ANW veteran
  • Grant McCartney ("Island Ninja") - 29, 4-time ANW veteran
  • Meagan Martin - 28, 5-time ANW veteran
  • Jake Murray ("The Wild Man") - 31, fastest time on Stage 1 in the National Finals
  • Mathis Owhadi ("The Kid") - 19, ANW rookie
  • Tyler Gillett ("The Dream Chaser") - 22, ANW rising star
  • Barclay Stockett ("Sparkly Ninja") - 23, one of the shortest competitors at 5'0

Overview

Obstacles
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3
Archer Alley Epic Catch & Release Floating Boards
Propeller Bar Criss Cross Salmon Ladder En Garde
Double Dipper Deja Vu Crazy Clocks
Jumping Spider Swing Surfer Ultimate Cliffhanger
Tire Run Wingnut Alley Curved Body Prop
Warped Wall Water Walls Peg Cloud
Razor Beams Cane Lane
Twist & Fly + Final Climb Flying Bar

Results

Stage 1

Team Matt gets the fastest time of the season with a time of 1:20.48, beating Team Akbar's time of 1:22.40. Despite flying through the first four obstacles, Team Kristine failed on Tire Run and could not post a time.

Leaderboard

Order Competitor Outcome Result
1 Jesse Labreck, Lance Pekus, Jamie Rahn (previously 27th - 2:18.93 in the National Finals) (Team Matt  ) Finished 1:20.48
2 Meagan Martin, Jake Murray (previously 1st - 1:36.00 in the National Finals), Grant McCartney (Team Akbar  ) Finished 1:22.40
3 Mathis "Kid" Owhadi Finished 1:27.18 (previously 3rd - 1:45.71 in the National Finals)
4 Drew Drechsel Finished 1:37.20
5 Daniel Gil Finished 1:47.65
6 Austin Gray Finished 1:52.11
7 Drew Knapp Finished 2:01.32
8 Adam Rayl Finished 2:02.04
9 Josh Salinas Finished 2:03.25
10 Tyler Gillett Finished 2:03.27
11 Najee Richardson Finished 2:03.86
12 R.J. Roman Finished 2:04.10
13 Ethan Swanson Finished 2:04.79
14 Karson Voiles Finished 2:06.22
15 Sean Bryan Finished 2:07.05
16 Josh Levin Finished 2:09.10
17 Hunter Guerard Finished 2:09.68
18 Ashlin Herbert Finished 2:09.80
19 Eric Middleton Finished 2:09.84
20 Lucas Reale Finished 2:10.20
21 Mike Meyers Finished 2:11.15
22 Thomas Stillings Finished 2:11.42
23 Brian Burkhardt Finished 2:14.11
24 Angel Rodriguez Finished 2:15.12
25 Jonathan Stevens Finished 2:15.42
26 Chris Wilczewski Finished 2:16.29
27 Dan Polizzi Finished 2:16.93
28 Nicholas Coolridge Finished 2:17.84
29 Mike Murray Finished 2:20.60
30 Zach Day Finished 2:21.09
31 Casey Suchocki Finished 2:21.51
32 Jack Wilson Finished 2:30.61
33 Oliver Edelmann Finished 2:49.36
34 Barclay Stockett Finished 3:02.57

Stage 2

Team Kristine failed on the Criss Cross Salmon Ladder and got eliminated by Team Akbar, who failed on the Swing Surfer.

Stage 3

Both teams completed Stage 3 (6 obstacles). Team Akbar finished in 4:59.06, and Team Matt finished in 4:52.63, winning the competition for the first time ever.

Leaderboard

Order Competitor Outcome Result
1 Lance Pekus, Jamie Rahn, Jesse Labreck (Team Matt  ) Finished (6 obstacles) 4:52.63
2 Grant McCartney, Jake Murray, Meagan Martin (Team Akbar  ) Finished (6 obstacles) 4:59.06

Champions: Team Matt

Skills Competition

2020

The fifth all-stars (skills challenge) special aired on August 31, 2020, on NBC, a week before the start of the twelfth season's premiere. Like previous seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila returned, this time with Zuri Hall as the sideline reporter picking her first team this year, as well as competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills in competitions, which consisted of the Fearsome Ferris Wheel, Striding Steps, Mega Spider Climb, Big Dipper Freestyle. They chose their all-star teams consisting of two male veterans and one female veteran. Team Matt (blue): Karsten Williams, Ryan Stratis, and Michelle Warnky. Team Akbar (red): Grant McCartney, Jake Murray, and Allyssa Beird. Team Zuri (yellow), like herself, Zuri chose a team of rookies: David Wright, Seth Rogers, and Mady Howard.

Note: Some of the skills competition events that featured Drew Drechsel as one of the competitors were not shown on the special, due to US legal proceedings.

Team Competition

Rosters

Team Matt
Michelle Warnky Karsten Williams Ryan Stratis
Team Akbar
Allyssa Beird Grant McCartney Jake Murray
Team Zuri
Mady Howard Seth Rogers David Wright
Team Matt   Team Akbar   Team Zuri  
  • Michelle Warnky - 35, Worthington, OH - Gym Owner, one of only three women ever to finish a city finals
  • Karsten Williams ("The Big Kat") - 39, Fairview, TX - Ninja Coach; Made it to Stage 3 in Season 11
  • Ryan Stratis - 37, Aurora, CO - Ninja Coach; Competed on every ANW season
  • Allyssa Beird - 29, Plainville, MA - 5th Grade Teacher, one of only two women to ever conquer Stage 1
  • Grant McCartney ("Island Ninja") - 32, Honolulu, HI - Flight Attendant, 5-time ANW veteran
  • Jake Murray ("The Wild Man") - 33, Golden, CO - Ninja Trainer, one of the fastest competitors in ANW history
  • Mady Howard - 24, St. George, UT - ICU Nurse, ANW rookie
  • Seth Rogers ("Big Red") - 20, Pleasanton, CA - College Student, ANW rookie; Made it to Stage 3 in Season 11
  • David Wright ("Da Cake Ninja") - 20, Houston, TX - Lifeguard, ANW rookie

-->

Overview

Obstacles
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3
Archer Alley Giant Walk the Plank Grip & Tip
Spin Your Wheels Extension Ladder Iron Summit
Double Dipper Snap Back Crazy Clocks
Jumping Spider Swing Surfer Ultimate Cliffhanger
Tire Run Grim Sweeper Pipe Dream
Warped Wall Water Walls Cane Lane
Diving Boards Flying Bar
Twist & Fly + Final Climb

Results

Stage 1

Both Team Zuri and Team Matt completed Stage 1. Team Zuri finished with a time of 2:31.48, and Team Matt finished with a time of 2:29.16. Despite being the fastest through the first six obstacles, Team Akbar failed on the Diving Boards and could not post a time.

Leaderboard

Rank Competitor Outcome Result
1 Mathis "Kid" Owhadi Finished 1:38.22
2 Michael Torres Finished 1:42.36 (previously 12th - 2:12.32 in the National Finals)
3 Ethan Swanson Finished 1:48.73
4 Daniel Gil Finished 1:49.46
5 Adam Rayl Finished 1:52.50 (previously 5th - 1:54.72 in the National Finals)
6 Tyler Smith Finished 1:53.19
7 Josh Salinas Finished 1:57.95
8 Lucas Reale Finished 2:01.03
9 Tyler Gillett Finished 2:02.45
10 Drew Drechsel Finished 2:09.75
11 Joe Moravsky Finished 2:10.19
12 Kevin Carbone Finished 2:11.14
13 Hunter Guerard Finished 2:12.70
14 Dave Cavanagh Finished 2:14.57
15 Flip Rodriguez Finished 2:16.99
16 Alex Blick Finished 2:18.42
17 Nate Burkhalter Finished 2:18.99
18 Ben Wales Finished 2:19.78
19 Chris DiGangi Finished 2:21.90
20 R.J. Roman Finished 2:22.05
21 Dan Polizzi Finished 2:22.15
22 Grant McCartney Finished 2:23.44
23 Karson Voiles Finished 2:24.41
24 Lorin Ball Finished 2:25.27
25 Casey Suchocki Finished 2:25.66
26 Karsten Williams (previously 19th - 2:19.92 in the National Finals), Ryan Stratis (previously 20th - 2:20.96 in the National Finals), Michelle Warnky (Team Matt  ) Finished 2:29.16
27 David Wright, Seth Rogers (previously 24th - 2:22.60 in the National Finals), Mady Howard (Team Zuri  ) Finished 2:31.48
28 Olivia Vivian Finished 2:56.26
29 Jesse Labreck Finished N/A

Stage 2

Both teams completed Stage 2. Team Zuri finished in 2:34.11, and Team Akbar finished in 2:00.71.

Leaderboard

Rank Competitor Outcome Result
1 Josh Salinas Finished 1:57.20
2 Tyler Smith Finished 1:58.33
3 Jake Murray, Allyssa Beird, Grant McCartney (Team Akbar  ) Finished 2:00.71
4 Bryson Klein Finished 2:02.39
5 Ethan Swanson Finished 2:06.40
6 Joe Moravsky Finished 2:12.93
7 Daniel Gil Finished 2:24.47 (previously 1st - 1:55.43 in the National Finals)
8 Karsten Williams Finished 2:24.62
9 Tyler Gillett Finished 2:24.68
10 Drew Drechsel Finished 2:25.66
11 Kevin Carbone Finished 2:29.44
12 Adam Rayl Finished 2:30.20
13 Hunter Guerard Finished 2:32.06
14 Chris DiGangi Finished 2:32.64
15 Mady Howard, Seth Rogers (previously 18th - 2:45.73 in the National Finals), David Wright (Team Zuri  ) Finished 2:34.11
16 Casey Suchocki Finished 2:36.97
17 Lucas Reale Finished 2:37.27
18 Ryan Stratis Finished 2:44.69
19 Michael Torres Finished 2:49.14
20 R.J. Roman Finished 2:49.19
21 Mathis Owhadi Finished 2:49.47
22 Karson Voiles Finished 2:51.28
23 Nate Burkhalter Finished 2:59.04

Stage 3

Team Matt completed Stage 3, winning the competition for the second year in a row. Team Akbar made it all the way to Cane Lane before failing.

Leaderboard

Order Finalist Outcome
1 Drew Drechsel Finished (previously 2nd - 7:36.95 in the National Finals)
2 Daniel Gil Finished (7:35.13)
3 Michelle Warnky, Ryan Stratis, Karsten Williams (Team Matt  ) Finished

Champions: Team Matt

Skills Competition

2022

The sixth All-Stars Special aired on May 30, 2022 on NBC and was renamed All Star Spectacular, a week before the start of the fourteenth season's premiere. Like previous seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila returned, alongside Zuri Hall as the sideline reporter. This also marks the return of the format after missing out during post twelfth season, due to the various changes in format as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. There were some competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills, which consisted of the Spring Forward Tag, Cat Grab, Big Dipper Freestyle and Striding Steps. Compared to previous tournaments, there was no Team Competition to set.

Event champions

Celebrity Ninja Warrior

Celebrity Ninja Warrior is a special episode of ANW where celebrities compete on a modified American Ninja Warrior course and are coached by ANW competitors. The special aired as part of Red Nose Day, with money raised during the event donated to Comic Relief USA. Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila hosted both editions alongside ANW sideline reporter Kristine Leahy.

The first special aired on May 25, 2017. Nine celebrities competed. For every obstacle the celebrities completed, M&M's and The Rockefeller Foundation pledged to donate $5,000.[citation needed]. A total of $205,000 was raised.

The second special aired on May 24, 2018, and is notable for being the only time one of the show's hosts (Akbar Gbaja-Biamila) has actually run the course in competition. Each obstacle a celebrity completed raised $5,000 for Red Nose Day; earning up to $30,000 for finishing the whole course. A total of $185,000 was raised, courtesy of Comcast.

2017[55]
Celebrity Coach
Stephen Amell Kacy Catanzaro
Derek Hough Daniel Gil
Erika Christensen Flip Rodriguez
Natalie Morales Grant McCartney
Nikki Glaser Jessie Graff
Jeff Dye Meagan Martin
Mena Suvari Natalie Duran
Nick Swisher Drew Drechsel
Ashton Eaton Kevin Bull
2018[56]
Celebrity Coach
Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Kevin Bull
Ne-Yo Drew Drechsel
Colton Dunn Natalie Duran
Derek Hough Meagan Martin
Nikki Bella Grant McCartney
Scott Evans Flip Rodriguez
Nastia Liukin Barclay Stockett
Gregg Sulkin Maggi Thorne

Women's Championship

A special, American Ninja Warrior Women's Championship aired on May 9, 2021, on NBC at 7:00pm EDT. It featured 12 female competitors that battled through three rounds. In Round 1, all 12 women will face a six-obstacle course. The top 6 women will advance to Round 2, the extended ten-obstacle course. The top four women will advance to race head-to-head on the Power Tower. The winner takes home $50,000 and becomes the ANW female champion.[57]

ANW Women's Champion 2021: Meagan Martin

ANW Women's Champion 2022: Jesse Labreck

Family Championship

American Ninja Warrior hosted the first Family Championship on NBC September 5, 2022 at 8:00pm EDT. Ten families competed relay-style on a six-obstacle course (in teams consisting of three family members). The top four teams then faced-off in a Power Tower Tournament, but only one family was crowned American Ninja Warrior Family Champions.

Rules: Each family will run the course twice relay-style by tagging their family member. Must change up the team's run order in Round 2. The four families who covers the most obstacles will advance to the head-to-head Power Tower Tournament.

Power Tower Tournament: Giant Steps to Flag Pole, TAG family member, Angled Steps to Column Climb, TAG, Cliffhanger to Dropping Shelves and hit the buzzer to finish.

2022
Family members Points (Round 1/Round 2) Outcome
Lewis Family (Derrick: dad, Noel: mom, Darius: son) Del Valle, TX 3/0 total: 3 ELMINATED
Webber Family (Ian: husband, Karissa: wife, Kaleb: nephew) Lehigh, UT 4/2 total: 6 ELMINATED
Wright Family (Mike: brother, Nikkilette: sister, Roman: cousin) Tennessee 3/3 total: 6 ELMINATED
Choi Family (Jimmy: dad, Karina: daughter, Minkay: cousin) Bolingbrook, IL 4/4 total: 8 ELMINATED
Johnston Family (Cody: dad, Rylie: daughter, Preslie: daughter) Scottsdale, AZ 4/4 total: 8 ELMINATED
O'Dell Family (George: dad, Amanda: mom, Trey: son) Indianapolis, IN 4/4 total: 8 ELMINATED
Henrichs Family (Shawn: dad, Annabella: older daughter, Secorra: younger daughter) 6/3 total: 9 LOST Power Tower Race 2 to Beckstrand Family
Zimmerman Family (Sandy: mom, Charlie: dad, Brett: son) Spokane, WA 4/6 total: 10 LOST Power Tower Race 1 to Auer Family
Beckstrand Family (Holly: mom, Brian: dad, Kai: son) St. George, Utah 3/6 total: 9 LOST Power Tower Race 3 to Auer Family
Auer Family (Hannah: wife Caleb: husband Josh: brother) Holly  Springs, NC 4/5 total: 9 ANW Family CHAMPIONS

Reception

Awards and nominations

American Ninja Warrior awards and nominations
Awards Won Nominated
Creative Arts Emmy Awards
0 3
Directors Guild of America Awards
0 1
Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards
0 2
People's Choice Awards
0 2
Primetime Emmy Awards
0 4
Producers Guild of America Awards
0 2
Totals
Awards won 0
Nominations 14

Creative Arts Emmy Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2018 Outstanding Directing for a Reality Program Patrick McManus "Daytona Beach Qualifiers" Nominated [58]
Outstanding Picture Editing for a Structured or Competition Reality Program Editing Team[b] Nominated
2019 Outstanding Directing for a Reality Program Patrick McManus "Minneapolis City Qualifiers" Nominated

Directors Guild of America Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2019 Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Reality Programs Patrick McManus "Miami City Qualifiers" Nominated [59]

Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2015 Favorite Reality Show American Ninja Warrior Season 6 Nominated [60]
2017 Season 8 Nominated [61]

People's Choice Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2016 Favorite Competition TV Show American Ninja Warrior Season 7 Nominated [62]
2017 Season 8 Nominated [63]

Primetime Emmy Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2016 Outstanding Competition Program American Ninja Warrior Season 7 Nominated [58]
2017 Season 8 Nominated
2018 Season 9 Nominated
2019 Season 10 Nominated

Producers Guild of America Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2017 Outstanding Producer of Competition Television Production Team[c] Season 7, 8 Nominated [64]
2018 Production Team[d] Season 9 Nominated [65]

Ratings

Season Time slot (ET) Episodes Premiered Ended USA vs. The World All Stars Celebrity Ninja Warrior Women's Championship Family Championship Channel/
Network
TV season Season averages (NBC)
(Live + SD)
Most watched episode
(millions)
Date Premiere viewers
(millions)
Date Finale viewers
(millions)
Date Viewers (millions) Date Viewers (millions) Date Viewers (millions) Date Viewers (millions) Date Viewers (millions) Viewers (millions) 18–49 rating
1 Saturday 6:00 pm 8 December 12, 2009 December 19, 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A G4 2009 N/A N/A
2 Wednesday 8:00 pm 10 December 8, 2010 January 2, 2011 2010 N/A N/A
3 Sunday 9:00 pm 10 July 31, 2011 0.38[66] August 21, 2011 0.25[67] 2011 N/A N/A 0.38[66]
4 Monday 9:00 pm 24 May 20, 2012 0.34[68] July 23, 2012 4.87[69] G4
NBC
2012 5.46[69] 2.0[69] 6.78[69]
5 Monday 8:00 pm 22 June 30, 2013 5.04[70] September 16, 2013 4.04[70] January 13, 2014 N/A 2013 5.15[70] 1.6[70] 5.81[70]
6 Monday 9:00 pm 15 May 26, 2014 4.65[71] September 8, 2014 5.21[71] September 15, 2014 N/A NBC 2014 5.33[71] 1.8[71] 5.83[71]
7 Monday 8:00 pm 18 May 25, 2015 5.87[72] September 14, 2015 6.17[72] January 31, 2016 N/A May 29, 2016 N/A 2015 6.54[72] 1.9[72] 7.32[72]
8 15 June 1, 2016 6.35[73] September 12, 2016 5.88[73] June 4, 2017 N/A February, 20, 2017 N/A 2016 6.28[73] 1.8[73] 7.01[73]
9 18 June 12, 2017 5.36[74] September 18, 2017 5.96[74] March 11, 2018 N/A May 17, 2018 N/A May 25, 2017 N/A 2017 5.86[74] 1.4[74] 6.47[74]
10 18 May 30, 2018 5.35[75] September 10, 2018 5.69[75] January 27, 2019 N/A May 26, 2019 N/A May 24, 2018 N/A 2018 5.08[75] 1.1[75] 5.86[75]
11 18 May 29, 2019 4.84[76] September 16, 2019 4.93[77] January 26, 2020 N/A August 31, 2020 N/A N/A N/A 2019 TBA TBA 4.93[77]
12 Monday 8:00 pm
(1–3, 5)
Monday 9:00 pm
(4)
Wednesday 9:00 pm
(6–7)
Friday 8:00 pm
(8)
9 September 7, 2020 3.66[78] November 6, 2020 2.97[79] N/A N/A N/A N/A May 9, 2021 N/A 2020 TBA TBA TBA
13 Monday 8:00 pm
(1–2, 4–12)
Monday 9:00 pm (3)
15 May 31, 2021 3.30[80] September 13, 2021 3.53[81] May 30, 2022 N/A May 8, 2022 N/A September 5, 2022 N/A 2021 TBA TBA TBA
14 Monday 8:00 pm 12 June 6, 2022 3.13[82] August 29, 2022 3.14[83] TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD 2022 TBA TBA TBA

International broadcasts

In Australia and New Zealand, the show is broadcast on SBS2 (2013–2017), 9Go! (2018–present),[84] TV3 and Four. On April 25, 2016, it was announced that Canadian broadcaster CTV picked up American Ninja Warrior for its 2016 summer broadcast schedule.[85] In the United Kingdom and Ireland, the show is broadcast on Challenge and more recently on Sky Two.[86] In Israel, the show is broadcast on Yes Action with the American version, and on Keshet 12 with its own version.[87] In 2016, Croatian RTL[88] started broadcasting the show. The show is also shown in Finland on Sub-TV. In the Netherlands the show was first broadcast in 2017 on SBS 6, where their own Ninja Warrior NL has been broadcast.[89] In Norway it is broadcast on TV2 Zebra.[90] The show also airs in South Africa, on SABC 3, airing Sunday afternoons 13:30.

Syndication

The show is in syndication markets throughout the US and airs on local broadcast channels. At one point syndicated episodes were airing on MTV2 on Saturdays in August 2018. On August 12, 2019, the series began airing reruns on Nickelodeon. However, after airing just 10 episodes, the series was abruptly pulled from Nick's schedule after August 23, 2019.

Spin-offs

Ninja vs. Ninja

Main article: American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja

On October 9, 2015, Esquire Network announced a spin-off of American Ninja Warrior, which would feature 24 three-person teams (two men and one woman) of popular ANW alumni, initially titled Team Ninja Warrior. The teams compete head-to-head against each other, running the course simultaneously, thus creating a new live duel dynamic (including crossing points, where the two competitors can affect the other's progress.) The two teams with the fastest times advance to the finale, where one team will be crowned the winner and receive a cash prize. Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila host alongside actor and journalist, Alex Curry. The series is Esquire Network's most-watched program in the channel's history.

On May 31, 2016, Esquire Network ordered a sixteen-episode second season that also included a five-episode special college edition that had college-aged competitors go head-to-head against rival schools. On March 6, 2017, it was announced that Team Ninja Warrior will be moving to sibling cable channel USA Network as Esquire Network winds down its linear channel operations and relaunches as an online only service. The show's second season premiered proper on April 18. Ahead of its third season, the show was also re-titled American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja.

American Ninja Warrior Junior

Main article: American Ninja Warrior Junior

On May 2, 2018, the second spin-off of American Ninja Warrior—entitled American Ninja Warrior Junior— was announced. Premiered on Universal Kids on October 13, 2018, Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila reprised their roles from ANW as hosts, with Olympic 2016 gold medalist Elijah Browning joining as co-host, guiding competitors in head-to-head challenges. The series will feature 142 kids ages 9–14 competing along a course of miniature ANW obstacles such as the Sky hooks. Similar to ANW, males and females will run along the same course, and similarly to Ninja vs. Ninja and College Madness, competitors compete head-to-head. However, they will be divided into three age groups: 9–10, 11–12 and 13–14, with each category coached by fan-favorite athletes: Korey Kade, Lucas Gomes, Calle Alexander, Caleb Bergie, Danny Bergie, and Natalie Duran. In May 2021, it was announced that the third season would be moving to Peacock.

American Ninja Warrior: Challenge

"American Ninja Warrior: Challenge" redirects here. Not to be confused with American Ninja Challenge.

American Ninja Warrior: Challenge
The cover art for American Ninja Warrior - Challenge.jpg
Cover art
Developer(s)Gaming Corps Austin
Publisher(s)GameMill Entertainment
EngineUnity
Platform(s)PlayStation 4
Xbox One
Nintendo Switch
Release
  • NA: March 19, 2019
Genre(s)Sports
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

A sports video game based on the series, American Ninja Warrior: Challenge, was released exclusively in North America on March 19, 2019 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch. It was developed by Gaming Corps Austin and published by GameMill Entertainment. The Career mode is the main mode of the game, and much like in real life, it centers around the idea of picking and training on various obstacles, participating in skills competitions, and competing in the 6 different rounds of American Ninja Warrior. The 6 rounds are the Qualifiers, the City Finals, and the 4 stages of Mount Midoriyama, Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3, and Stage 4, just like on the TV show that it is inspired by. Its Quick Play mode allows up to 4 players to compete on predetermined obstacle courses.[91][92][93][94]

Obstacle and course creation

This section has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article contains text that is written in a promotional tone. Please help improve it by removing promotional language and inappropriate external links, and by adding encyclopedic text written from a neutral point of view. (November 2021) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2021) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Alongside producers of the show, the course is designed, prototyped, fabricated, and constructed by The ATS Team (ATS), a production company and set shop based out of Los Angeles, California.

Since Season 4, each November producers begin collaborating creatively with ATS on which obstacles will be brought back and which obstacle positions need to be re-filled. From here, ideas are pitched by both parties. Also during this time, obstacle ideas submitted by fans and even from competitors of the show are reviewed through an "Obstacle Design Challenge." Winners of this challenge have had their obstacle featured on the course and previously have been granted tickets to the show with airline and hotel accommodations.

As new creative is being invented, the obstacles are tested internally with a group of athletes to ensure the ideas are strong enough for the show and determined where they should be positioned within the overall obstacle course grid. Obstacles in this grid are ranked and serve as the map for Regional Qualifiers, Regional Semi-Finals, and Series Finals to ensure difficulty and body core fairness amongst competitors.

Once the obstacles have been selected, they are loaded onto semi trucks for the national regional tour. This coordination amounts to 30+ tour shipment truck movements. When the trucks arrive the city locations they are unloaded and the TV set is constructed. The course is built within 3–4 days to allow for 2 days of more testing, tweaking, and camera rehearsals. The show is largely filmed within a few days time and accommodates 120-150 competitor capacity during a 12-hour period. The set is taken down within 2 days and loaded onto the trucks for the next city filming.

Meanwhile, the moment city one obstacles are loaded onto the trucks the creative for the Series Finals begins. While the main tour is occurring, the Series Finals prototype and fabrication stages commence at ATS' shop to create new and even bigger obstacles to test the best of the best competitors.

Typically held in Las Vegas, Nevada, the Series Finals set construction takes about 20 days including 6 days of initial earth moving and pool digging. This set is tested within 3 days and films for 2 days. On day 1, Stage 1 is filmed. On day 2, Stage 2, 3 and 4 are filmed. Additional days are added for any Specials that may also be scheduled. After filming, the main course is deconstructed in 2.5 days.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Geoff Britten and Isaac Caldiero both completed Stage 4 in under 30 seconds and achieved Total Victory. Britten completed Stage 4 in 0:29.65 seconds, earning the title of "First American Ninja Warrior" for being the first to complete all six courses (city qualifying, city finals, and four stages of Mount Midoriyama) in a single season, and Caldiero completed Stage 4 in 0:26.14 seconds, earning the title of "Second American Ninja Warrior" and $1,000,000 due to him having the fastest time. [8]
  2. ^ 2018 Creative Arts Emmy Awards nominees for "Outstanding Picture Editing for a Structured or Competition Reality Program": Nick Gagnon, David Greene, Michael Kalbron, Corey Ziemniak, Curtis Pierce, Kyle Barr, Mary Dechambres, Matthew Probst, Scott Simmons, Martin Singer, Katherine Griffin, Flavyn Mendoza.
  3. ^ 28th Producers Guild of America Awards nominees for "Outstanding Producer of Competition Television": Arthur Smith, Kent Weed, Anthony Storm, Brian Richardson, Kristen Stabile, David Markus, J.D. Pruess, D. Max Poris, Zayna Abi-Hashim, Royce Toni, John Gunn, Matt Silverberg, Briana Vowels, Mason Funk, Jonathan Provost.
  4. ^ 29th Producers Guild of America Awards nominees for "Outstanding Producer of Competition Television": Arthur Smith, Kent Weed, Anthony Storm, Brian Richardson, Kristen Stabile, David Markus, Royce Toni, Stephen Saylor, J.D. Pruess, Jeffrey J. Hyman, D. Max Poris, Briana Vowels, and Jonathan Provost.

References

  1. ^ Lee, Nikki (October 5, 2017). "Director Patrick McManus on creating the pieces of the American Ninja Warrior puzzle". American NInja Warrior Nation. Archived from the original on August 7, 2018. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "American Ninja Warrior (Titles & Air Dates Guide)". epguides. January 10, 2019. Archived from the original on July 17, 2015. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "G4 Announces New Competition Series "American Ninja Warrior," Taking America's Top 10 Competitors to Japan to Take on the World Famous Sasuke Obstacle Course". The Futon Critic. July 29, 2009. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d "G4 Announces Season Two of "American Ninja Warrior"". The Futon Critic. July 26, 2010. Retrieved January 19, 2009.
  5. ^ a b "NBC Announces Three New and Returning Series Premieres for Summer 2012 Schedule". The Futon Critic. March 15, 2012. Archived from the original on April 11, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Lee, Nikki (May 30, 2018). "The evolution of American Ninja Warrior: Seasons 1–4". American Ninja Warrior Nation. SB Nation. Archived from the original on April 24, 2019. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  7. ^ Petski, Denise (February 14, 2019). "'American Ninja Warrior' Renewed For Season 8 By NBC". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on February 15, 2019. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  8. ^ a b c "NBC's "American Ninja Warrior" Makes History with First Winner". The Futon Critic. September 14, 2015. Archived from the original on March 20, 2016. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  9. ^ a b c d e "G4 and NBC Premiere New Season of "American Ninja Warrior," the World's Most Difficult and Action-Packed Obstacle Course Competition Series". The Futon Critic. April 11, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c "G4 Brings Fans the Biggest and Most Daring "Ninja Warrior" Event in the Network's History with "American Ninja Warrior"". The Futon Critic. November 30, 2009. Retrieved January 19, 2009.
  11. ^ Estrin, Joshua (November 26, 2013). "Matt Iseman "American Ninja Warrior" Says: It Shouldn't Hurt To Laugh". HuffPost. Archived from the original on April 24, 2017. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  12. ^ a b "G4 Ups the Action in New Season of "American Ninja Warrior" With More Intense Competition, A Live-In Elimination Boot Camp and A $250,000 Prize". The Futon Critic. November 4, 2010. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c "G4 and NBC Team Up to Give Fans the Most Action-Packed Event of the Summer With Season Three of G4's Hit Series "American Ninja Warrior"". The Futon Critic. June 30, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  14. ^ Hibberd, James (April 8, 2013). "'American Ninja Warrior' returning with new hosts". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 12, 2016. Retrieved October 24, 2015.
  15. ^ Former SDSU Football Star, And New Host of American Ninja Warrior Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Joined Scott & BR!. mighty1090.com (Radio broadcast). January 31, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  16. ^ Lesley Goldberg (2015-03-12). "'American Ninja Warrior' Taps New Co-Host for Season 7. (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 2015-09-27. Retrieved 2022-03-26.
  17. ^ "NBC Announces Summer Premiere Dates for "America's Got Talent" and "American Ninja Warrior"". The Futon Critic. March 5, 2019. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  18. ^ a b "American Ninja Warrior 14 Contestant Application". American Ninja Warrior Casting. Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  19. ^ "The Conversation: 'American Ninja Warrior' Geoff Britten on winning the game show". Washington Times. Archived from the original on 2015-09-26. Retrieved 2015-09-27.
  20. ^ a b c Bryant, Kelly (June 2, 2016). "9 Fierce Facts About American Ninja Warrior". Mental Floss. Archived from the original on April 4, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2019.
  21. ^ a b Prokos, Katrina (October 7, 2013). "Gainesville Resident Takes On New Name: American Ninja Warrior". WUFT. Archived from the original on January 30, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  22. ^ Chapin, Adele (August 28, 2015). "Why Does Everyone Want to Become an American Ninja Warrior?". Racked. Archived from the original on September 19, 2016. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  23. ^ "'If It Were Easy, It Wouldn't Be Interesting,' Say 'Ninja Warrior' Producers". NPR. June 23, 2016. Archived from the original on August 7, 2018. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  24. ^ Lee, Nikki (March 21, 2017). "American Ninja Warrior producers and hosts discuss the show's exponential growth". American Ninja Warrior Nation. Archived from the original on August 7, 2018. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  25. ^ Lee, Nikki. "American Ninja Warrior introduces a new walk-on format for season 11". American Ninja Warrior Nation. Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  26. ^ a b Lee, Nikki (January 10, 2017). "The fine points of American Ninja Warrior course evolution". American Ninja Warrior Nation. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  27. ^ a b c d e Lee, Nikki (May 30, 2018). "The evolution of American Ninja Warrior: Seasons 8–10". American Ninja Warrior Nation. SB Nation. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  28. ^ a b Garofalo, Alex (June 1, 2016). "'American Ninja Warrior' Season 8's Biggest Obstacle: Compensation For The Athletes". International Business Times. Archived from the original on September 6, 2018. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  29. ^ a b c O'Hare, Kate (August 17, 2011). "'American Ninja Warrior' storms Japan's Mount Midoriyama". The Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  30. ^ a b c Nordyke, Kimberly (July 1, 2013). "'American Ninja Warrior' EP 'Hopeful' This Season Will Produce First Winner (Video)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c d e Johnson, Lottie Peterson (September 11, 2018). "2 Utahns come up short on 'American Ninja Warrior' finale — but at least this time they had a shot at a prize". Deseret News. Archived from the original on January 30, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  32. ^ a b Johnson, Lottie Peterson (September 19, 2017). "Season 9 of 'American Ninja Warrior' concludes with no winner — as usual". Deseret News. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  33. ^ Hill, Kelly (July 27, 2013). "'American Ninja Warrior' contestant to host fitness camp in Rockford". MLive.com. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  34. ^ "(#416–120) FINALS". The Futon Critic. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  35. ^ a b c d e Lee, Nikki (May 30, 2018). "The evolution of American Ninja Warrior: Seasons 5–7". American Ninja Warrior Nation. SB Nation. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  36. ^ "G4 Heads to Japan for Third Season of "American Ninja Warrior" and Gives Fans the Opportunity to Support the Country's Relief Efforts Through the American Red Cross". The Futon Critic. April 28, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  37. ^ Hale, Mike (August 21, 2011). "A 'Ninja Warrior' Upgrade Into Network Prime Time". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018.
  38. ^ a b c "G4 and NBC Partner to Broadcast the New Season of "American Ninja Warrior" The World's Most Difficult and Action-Packed Obstacle Course Competition Series Airing Weekly This Summer". The Futon Critic. January 24, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  39. ^ a b c d e f g "American Ninja Warrior – Listings". The Futon Critic. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  40. ^ Levin, Gary (June 30, 2013). "'American Ninja Warrior' begins a new course". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  41. ^ Iannetta, Jessica (July 18, 2014). "'American Ninja' star Kacy Catanzaro of N.J.: 'I didn't realize how many other people would care'". NJ.com. Advance Publications. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  42. ^ Garofalo, Alex (November 14, 2014). "Is 'American Ninja Warrior' A Sport? Weatherman Joe Moravsky Trains For Season 7 Amid Questions Of Sponsorship And Getting Paid". International Business Times. Archived from the original on September 24, 2018. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  43. ^ "NBC's "American Ninja Warrior" Shows Its Strength with Fifth-Season Renewal". The Futon Critic. August 13, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  44. ^ Anderson, Jon R. (September 15, 2015). "Military 'Ninja' hopefuls fall to Mount Midoriyama". militarytimes.com. Sightline Media Group. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  45. ^ Moye, David (September 22, 2015). "NinjaGate: Who Is The True 'American Ninja Warrior'?". HuffPost. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  46. ^ a b Lee, Nikki (September 15, 2017). "First Look: Allyssa Beird's Stage Two run". American Ninja Warrior Nation. SB Nation. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2019.
  47. ^ Barnes, Katie (September 13, 2016). "This season of 'American Ninja Warrior' was a game-changer for women". ESPN. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2019.
  48. ^ Lee, Nikki (September 10, 2018). "National Finals finale recap: Season 10 closes with monster courses". American Ninja Warrior Nation. SB Nation. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 13, 2019.
  49. ^ Ninja Warrior [@ninjawarrior] (March 5, 2019). "Are you ready to overcome the next big obstacle?" (Tweet). Retrieved March 5, 2019 – via Twitter.
  50. ^ ""American Ninja Warrior" Flies Into Its Ninth Season Renewal on NBC" (Press release). NBC. January 21, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2020 – via The Futon Critic.
  51. ^ "American Ninja Warrior taping in Los Angeles postponed due to coronavirus COVID-19". March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on October 5, 2020. Retrieved May 25, 2020.
  52. ^ Joshua R. Smith (23 May 2020). "Urbana grad and stuntwoman Jessie Graff injects The Rock's 'Titan Games' with her star power". The Frederick News-Post. Archived from the original on 5 October 2020. Retrieved 26 May 2020.
  53. ^ "Season 12 of NBC's Four-Time Emmy Award-Nominated Athletic Competition Series American Ninja Warrior Will Premiere Monday, Sept. 7" (Press release). NBC. August 12, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020 – via The Futon Critic.
  54. ^ "American Ninja Warrior All-Stars". The Futon Critic. May 26, 2019. Retrieved May 9, 2019.
  55. ^ "Chris Hardwick to Host "The Red Nose Day Special" as NBC Expands Celebration of Red Nose Day to 3-Hour Program Block May 25 with Top Stars". The Futon Critic. April 5, 2017. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  56. ^ "Derek Hough, NE-YO, Nikki Bella and More Take on Obstacle Course on "Celebrity Ninja Warrior for Red Nose Day" to Raise Money For Charity". The Futon Critic. April 2, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  57. ^ "American Ninja Warrior Women's Championship: By the numbers". 10 May 2021.
  58. ^ a b "American Ninja Warrior – Awards & Nominations". Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  59. ^ "DGA Announces Nominees for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Television, Commercials and Documentary for 2018". Directors Guild of America. January 7, 2019. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  60. ^ "Kids' Choice Awards 2015: The Complete Winners List". The Hollywood Reporter. March 28, 2015. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  61. ^ Vulpo, Mike (March 11, 2017). "Kids' Choice Awards 2017 Winners: The Complete List". E! Online. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2022.
  62. ^ "2016 Winners and highlights". CBS News. January 6, 2016. Archived from the original on January 9, 2016. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  63. ^ "People's Choice Awards Nominees 2017 — Full List". Deadline. November 15, 2016. Archived from the original on May 3, 2017. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  64. ^ "2017 PGA Awards Winners". Producers Guild of America. Archived from the original on August 16, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  65. ^ "2018 PGA Awards Winners". Producers Guild of America. Archived from the original on August 9, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  66. ^ a b "Sunday's Cable Ratings: "True Blood" Still on Top for HBO". The Futon Critic. August 4, 2011. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  67. ^ "Sunday's Cable Ratings: Season Highs for "Keeping Up With the Kardashians," "True Blood"". The Futon Critic. August 16, 2011. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  68. ^ "Sunday's Cable Ratings: Spurs/Clippers Best "Thrones," "Kardashians"". The Futon Critic. May 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 13, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  69. ^ a b c d "SpotVault – American Ninja Warrior (NBC) – Summer 2012". Spotted Ratings. May 23, 2012. Archived from the original on August 8, 2018. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  70. ^ a b c d e "SpotVault – American Ninja Warrior (NBC) – Summer 2013 Ratings". Spotted Ratings. July 4, 2013. Archived from the original on August 8, 2018. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  71. ^ a b c d e "American Ninja Warrior: Summer 2014 Ratings". TV Series Finale. September 16, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  72. ^ a b c d e "American Ninja Warrior: Season Seven Ratings". TV Series Finale. September 8, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  73. ^ a b c d e "American Ninja Warrior: Season Eight Ratings". TV Series Finale. September 13, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  74. ^ a b c d e "American Ninja Warrior: Season Nine Ratings". TV Series Finale. September 19, 2017. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
  75. ^ a b c d e "American Ninja Warrior: Season 10 Ratings". TV Series Finale. September 11, 2018. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  76. ^ Welch, Alex (May 31, 2019). "'Schooled' repeat adjusts down: Wednesday final ratings". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on May 31, 2019. Retrieved May 31, 2019.
  77. ^ a b Rejent, Joseph (September 17, 2019). "'American Ninja Warrior' adjusts down: Monday final ratings". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  78. ^ Metcalf, Mitch (September 10, 2020). "UPDATED: SHOWBUZZDAILY's Top 150 Monday Cable & Network Finals: 9.7.2020". Show Buzz Daily. Archived from the original on September 12, 2020. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  79. ^ Metcalf, Mitch (November 9, 2020). "Updated: ShowBuzzDaily's Top 150 Friday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 11.6.2020". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on November 9, 2020. Retrieved November 10, 2020.
  80. ^ Berman, Marc (June 1, 2021). "Monday Ratings: NBC Game Show 'Small Fortune' and Fox's Animal 'Housebroken' Off to Sluggish Starts". Programming Insider. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  81. ^ Metcalf, Mitch (September 14, 2021). "Top 150 Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 9.13.2021". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  82. ^ Metcalf, Mitch (June 7, 2022). "Top 150 Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 6.6.2022". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved June 20, 2022.
  83. ^ Salem, Mitch (August 30, 2022). "Monday 8.29.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved August 30, 2022.
  84. ^ "Watch Australian Ninja Warrior Season 5, Catch up TV". 9now. Archived from the original on 2020-09-13. Retrieved 2019-02-16.
  85. ^ "Competition series 'American Ninja Warrior' to make Canadian debut this summer on CTV". CTV. 16 February 2019. Archived from the original on 17 February 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  86. ^ "Ninja Warrior". challenge.co.uk. Archived from the original on 17 February 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  87. ^ "Compulite – Ninja Israel; the most extreme challenge in the world lands in Israel, with a spectacular lighting rig controlled by Compulite Vectors". compulite.com. Archived from the original on 17 February 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  88. ^ "Najbolji ninja ratnici". RTL (in Croatian). Archived from the original on 17 February 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  89. ^ "Talpa Network". consent.talpanetwork.com. Archived from the original on 17 February 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  90. ^ "TV 2 Zebra". tv2.no. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  91. ^ "GameMill Entertainment to Hit the Obstacle Course with the Series-Inspired American Ninja Warrior Challenge Video Game". Universal Brand Development. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  92. ^ "American Ninja Warrior Challenge is Available Now". Universal Brand Development. Retrieved 19 March 2019.
  93. ^ Semel, Paul (27 March 2019). "American Ninja Warrior: Challenge". Common Sense Media. Retrieved 2020-08-16.
  94. ^ Shanley, Patrick (2019-01-23). "'American Ninja Warrior' Video Game Coming in March". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2022-03-26.

Cite error: A list-defined reference named "TFC Aug. 2016" is not used in the content (see the help page).
Cite error: A list-defined reference named "WP 2012" is not used in the content (see the help page).

Cite error: A list-defined reference named "Esquire Ad" is not used in the content (see the help page).