Cleve Andrew Pulley (born May 5, 1951),[1] better known as Andrew Pulley, is a former American politician who ran as Socialist Workers Party (SWP) nominee for Vice President of the United States in 1972 and one of three nominees the party put forth for President of the United States in 1980.

Pulley was also the SWP's nominee for mayor of Chicago in 1979.

He has also run for United States congress in the state of Michigan.

In 1972, Pulley ran for Vice President of the United States under the Socialist Workers Party.
In 1972, Pulley ran for Vice President of the United States under the Socialist Workers Party.

Biography

Pulley is African American. He is from Chicago, Illinois.[2]

Pulley was a civil rights movement supporter, steel mill worker and Vietnam War U.S. Army veteran who had opposed the war.[3] Pulley's speech at the April 24, 1971 500,000 person protest march in Washington, D.C. against the Vietnam War appears in filmmaker David Loeb Weiss' 1972 documentary short film, To Make a Revolution.[4] Pulley was one of the Fort Jackson Eight.[5] Pulley was a member of United Steelworkers Local 1066 at Gary Works.[3]

In 1972, he was the Socialist Workers Party nominee for vice president in 1972, the running mate of Linda Jenness. He and Jenness were nominated at the party's convention in Cleveland, which was held in August 1971.[6] At the time of the election, he was twenty years old, making him ineligible to serve as vice president under the United States Constitution (also ineligible was Jenness, who was 30).[7][8][6] The ticket of Jenness and him received 52,799 votes.

In 1979, Pulley ran for mayor of Chicago as the SWP nominee.[3] He received 1.83% of the vote.[9]

In some states, he was the SWP nominee for president in 1980.[10] As the party's presidential nominee in the states of California, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota, he received a total of 6,272 votes nationwide.[11] Among those supporting his candidacy was future-Senator Bernie Sanders.[12]

In 1984, Pulley was the SWP nominee for Michigan's 1st congressional district, and received 0.4% of the vote. A central part of his platform was opposition to the privatization of Wayne County General Hospital.[5]

In 1990, Pulley ran without any party affiliation for Michigan's 13th congressional district. He placed fifth out of five candidates, with 530 votes (0.8% of votes cast).[13]

References

  1. ^ "Woman Candidate Can't Win, Too Young To Serve". Sarasota Journal. 1971-09-06. pp. 4.B. Retrieved 2012-06-27.
  2. ^ Krebs, Albin (13 August 1971). "Socialist Workers Nominate Candidates". The New York Times. Retrieved 7 June 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Jenness, Doug (30 March 1979). "Chicago socialist candidate: 'Why workers need a labor party now'" (PDF). The Militant. Vol. 43, no. 12. Retrieved 7 June 2020.
  4. ^ Hardy, Terry (June 8, 1971). "YSA Film Report, YSA NEC [National Executive Committee] Minutes 1971" (PDF). Marxists Internet Archive. Retrieved March 1, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ a b "Bob Mattingly Button Collection Political Buttons". hll.org. Holt Labor Library. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  6. ^ a b Krebs, Albin (13 August 1971). "Socialist Workers Nominate Candidates". The New York Times.
  7. ^ Martin Waldron (January 2, 1972). "The Socialist Campaign: Low Funds, High Hopes". St. Petersburg Times. pp. 9–A.
  8. ^ Waldron, Martin Waldron (2 January 1972). "A Female Trotskyite Nominee Stumping in. Texas". The New York Times. Retrieved 7 June 2020.
  9. ^ "Election Results for 1979 General Election, Mayor, Chicago, IL".
  10. ^ Jeff Samuels (November 27, 1979). "Mill Worker's Sights Set on White House". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  11. ^ Kalb, Deborah (2015). Guide to U.S. Elections. CQ Press. p. 237. ISBN 978-1-4833-8038-4. Retrieved 7 June 2020.
  12. ^ Simonson, Joseph (30 May 2019). "Bernie Sanders campaigned for Marxist party in Reagan era". Washington Examiner. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  13. ^ "Michigan's 13th Congressional District". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 7 June 2020.