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Armenian newspapers are published in Armenia and in the Armenian diaspora where there are concentrations of Armenians.

Usually the newspapers are in the Armenian language, but many of the Armenian diaspora newspapers will usually have supplements or sections in the national language of the country where the newspaper is published.

Newspapers in Armenia

Main article: List of newspapers in Armenia

Newspapers in the Republic of Artsakh

Armenian daily and weekly newspapers in the diaspora

Argentina

Australia

Canada

Cyprus

Main article: Armenians in Cyprus § Information media

Egypt

France

Georgia

Greece

India

Iran

Lebanon

Poland

Russia

Syria

Turkey

19th Century Constantinople was home to the first known Western Armenian journal published and edited by a woman (Elpis Kesaratsian). Entering circulation in 1862, Kit'arr or Guitar stayed in print for only seven months. Female writers who openly expressed their desires were viewed as immodest, but this changed slowly as journals began to publish more "women's sections". In the 1880s, Matteos Mamurian invited Srpouhi Dussap to submit essays for Arevelian Mamal. According to Zaruhi Galemkearian's autobiography, she was told to write about women's place in the family and home after she published two volumes of poetry in the 1890s. By 1900, several Armenian journals had started to include works by female contributors including the Constantinople-based Tsaghik.[2]

United Kingdom

United States

[3]

Online Armenian news media in the diaspora

Pan-Armenian

Belarus

Cyprus

Egypt

France

Georgia

Italy

Poland

Romania

Russia

United States

Worldwide

Iran

Armenian periodicals in the diaspora

France

Jerusalem

Lebanon

United States

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Kantsasar also publishes an annual extra special issue (բացառիկ) in January each year. (ANLS: Armenian National Language Support 2.0 needed to view Armenian letters in site). Issues are downloadable as pdf.
  2. ^ Rowe, Victoria (2003). A History of Armenian Women's Writing, 1880–1922. Cambridge Scholars Press. ISBN 978-1-904303-23-7.

References