Bertie County
County of Bertie
Bertie County Courthouse in Windsor
Bertie County Courthouse in Windsor
Official seal of Bertie County
Map of North Carolina highlighting Bertie County
Location within the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°04′N 76°58′W / 36.06°N 76.96°W / 36.06; -76.96
Country United States
State North Carolina
Founded1739
Named forJames and/or Henry Bertie
SeatWindsor
Largest townWindsor
Area
 • Total741 sq mi (1,920 km2)
 • Land699 sq mi (1,810 km2)
 • Water42 sq mi (110 km2)  5.7%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2021)
17,505
 • Density30.4/sq mi (11.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.co.bertie.nc.us

Bertie County (/ˌbɜːrˈt/ BUR-TEE, with both syllables stressed) is a county located in the northeast area of the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 17,934.[1] Its county seat is Windsor.[2] The county was created in 1722 as Bertie Precinct and gained county status in 1739.[3]

The Sans Souci Ferry, providing access across the Cashie River, is the county's only ferry.

History

The county was formed as Bertie Precinct in 1722 from the part of Chowan Precinct of Albemarle County lying west of the Chowan River. It was named for James Bertie, his brother Henry Bertie, or perhaps both, each having been one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina.

In 1729 parts of Bertie Precinct, Chowan Precinct, Currituck Precinct, and Pasquotank Precinct of Albemarle County were combined to form Tyrrell Precinct. With the abolition of Albemarle County in 1739, all of its constituent precincts became separate counties. As population of settlers increased, in 1741 parts of Bertie County were organized as Edgecombe County and Northampton County. Finally, in 1759 parts of Bertie, Chowan, and Northampton counties were combined to form Hertford County. Bertie's boundaries have remained the same since then.

This mostly rural county depended on the agricultural economy well into the 20th century. In the colonial and antebellum eras, tobacco and cotton were the chief commodity crops, worked by African slaves. After the Civil War, agriculture continued to be important to the county. In the 21st century, developers have referred to it as being within the Inner Banks region, which is increasingly attracting retirees and buyers of second homes, because of its beaches and landscapes.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 741 square miles (1,920 km2), of which 699 square miles (1,810 km2) is land and 42 square miles (110 km2) (5.7%) is water.[4]

National protected area

State and local protected areas/sites

Adjacent counties

Major water-bodies

Major highways

Other major infrastructure

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179012,462
180011,249−9.7%
181011,218−0.3%
182010,805−3.7%
183012,26213.5%
184012,175−0.7%
185012,8515.6%
186014,31011.4%
187012,950−9.5%
188016,39926.6%
189019,17616.9%
190020,5387.1%
191023,03912.2%
192023,9934.1%
193025,8447.7%
194026,2011.4%
195026,4390.9%
196024,350−7.9%
197020,528−15.7%
198021,0242.4%
199020,388−3.0%
200019,773−3.0%
201021,2827.6%
202017,934−15.7%
2021 (est.)17,505[5]−2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[10]
2020[11]

2020 census

Bertie County racial composition[12]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 6,298 35.12%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 10,674 59.52%
Native American 57 0.32%
Asian 63 0.35%
Other/Mixed 512 2.85%
Hispanic or Latino 330 1.84%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 17,934 people, 7,909 households, and 4,733 families residing in the county.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 21,282 people living in the county. 62.5% were Black or African American, 35.2% White, 0.5% Asian, 0.5% Native American, 0.5% of some other race and 0.9% of two or more races. 1.3% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

2000 census

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 19,773 people, 7,743 households, and 5,427 families living in the county. The population density was 28 people per square mile (11/km2). There were 9,050 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 62.34% Black or African American, 36.30% White, 0.44% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, 0.48% from two or more races. 0.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,743 households, out of which 29.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.00% were married couples living together, 20.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.10% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 87.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,177, and the median income for a family was $30,186. Males had a median income of $26,866 versus $18,318 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,096. About 19.30% of families and 26% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.70% of those under age 18 and 28.30% of those age 65 or over.

Law and government

Bertie County is a member of the Mid-East Commission regional council of governments. The County Sheriff is the chief law enforcement officer.

United States presidential election results for Bertie County, North Carolina[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,817 38.89% 5,939 60.51% 59 0.60%
2016 3,456 36.97% 5,778 61.82% 113 1.21%
2012 3,387 33.46% 6,695 66.14% 41 0.41%
2008 3,376 34.58% 6,365 65.20% 22 0.23%
2004 3,057 38.06% 4,938 61.48% 37 0.46%
2000 2,488 34.67% 4,660 64.94% 28 0.39%
1996 1,745 27.83% 4,202 67.01% 324 5.17%
1992 1,756 26.04% 4,382 64.99% 605 8.97%
1988 2,145 36.24% 3,762 63.56% 12 0.20%
1984 2,879 41.91% 3,953 57.54% 38 0.55%
1980 1,695 30.10% 3,863 68.59% 74 1.31%
1976 1,332 24.35% 4,117 75.27% 21 0.38%
1972 2,874 60.54% 1,819 38.32% 54 1.14%
1968 811 11.38% 3,207 45.00% 3,108 43.61%
1964 931 21.84% 3,332 78.16% 0 0.00%
1960 577 13.55% 3,682 86.45% 0 0.00%
1956 469 12.21% 3,373 87.79% 0 0.00%
1952 384 9.74% 3,557 90.26% 0 0.00%
1948 85 2.68% 3,034 95.71% 51 1.61%
1944 124 3.80% 3,142 96.20% 0 0.00%
1940 98 2.90% 3,287 97.10% 0 0.00%
1936 115 2.92% 3,828 97.08% 0 0.00%
1932 65 2.02% 3,154 97.83% 5 0.16%
1928 374 15.75% 2,000 84.25% 0 0.00%
1924 159 8.16% 1,785 91.59% 5 0.26%
1920 212 10.33% 1,840 89.67% 0 0.00%
1916 116 7.36% 1,461 92.64% 0 0.00%
1912 43 2.57% 1,571 93.79% 61 3.64%


Education

Communities

Map of Bertie County, North Carolina with municipal and township labels
Map of Bertie County, North Carolina with municipal and township labels

Towns

Townships

Unincorporated communities

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on 2021 Estimates of Bertie County.[15]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2021 Estimates)
1 Windsor Town 3,568
2 Aulander Town 685
3 Lewiston Woodville Town 539
4 Powellsville Town 278
5 Askewville Town 251
6 Kelford Town 238
7 Roxobel Town 228
8 Colerain Town 189

See also

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Bertie County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 21, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "North Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". North Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Bertie County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  10. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Bertie County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  12. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  15. ^ "Bertie County NC - Cities, Towns, Neighborhoods, & Subdivisions". northcarolina.hometownlocator.com. Retrieved April 21, 2022.

Coordinates: 36°04′N 76°58′W / 36.06°N 76.96°W / 36.06; -76.96