Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award
Awarded forbest disabled athlete
LocationLos Angeles (2004)
Presented byESPN
First awarded2002
Last awarded2004
Currently held byKyle Maynard (USA)
Websitewww.espn.co.uk/espys/

The Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award (sometimes called the Outstanding Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award) was an annual award honoring the achievements of an athlete from the world of disabled sports.[1] It was first presented as part of the ESPY Awards at the 2002 edition as part of the ceremony's tenth anniversary of its establishment.[2] The Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan,[3] was presented to the disabled sportsperson adjudged to be the best at the annual ESPY Awards ceremony in Los Angeles.[1] For the 2004 ceremony, the winner was chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee.[4] Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts.[5] Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.[a][6]

The inaugural winner of the Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award at the 2002 edition was mountain climber Erik Weihenmayer who suffers from a total visual impairment and he became the first blind person to reach the summit of Mount Everest in May 2001.[2][7] He is one of three people to have won the award during its three-year history; sprinter Marlon Shirley won the accolade at the 2003 ceremony for becoming the first amputee in history to set a time below eleven seconds in the men's 100 metres at the Utah Summer Games,[8] and Kyle Maynard was voted the winner of the award in the 2004 iteration because of his strong form in freestyle wrestling in high school despite being born with congenital amputation that resulted in the shortening of all his limbs.[9] The Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award was discontinued and bifurcated by gender in 2005 to establish the Best Male Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award and the Best Female Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award.[10]

Winners and nominees

Best Athlete with a Disability ESPY Award winners and nominees
Year Image Athlete Nationality Sport Nominees Refs
2002
Erik Weihenmayer  USA Mountain climbing Stephen Pate ( USA) – Wheelchair rugby
Sarah Will ( USA) – Skiing
[2][11]
2003 Marlon Shirley  USA Track and field Paul Schulte ( USA) – Wheelchair basketball
Esther Vergeer ( NED) – Wheelchair tennis
[8][12]
2004
Kyle Maynard  USA Freestyle wrestling Cheri Blauwet ( USA) – Wheelchair racing
Travis Mohr ( USA) – Swimming
Ron Williams ( USA) – Cycling
[9][13]

See also

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Because of the rescheduling of the ESPY Awards ceremony, the award presented in 2002 was given in consideration of performance betwixt February 2001 and June 2002.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Nelson, Murry R. (2013). American Sports: A History of Icons, Idols and Ideas. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 399–401. ISBN 978-0-313-39753-0. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c Anderson, Marty; Metzler, Tim (September 1, 2002). "ESPY winner (Sports & Recreation)". Paraplegia News. Retrieved October 8, 2018 – via The Free Library.
  3. ^ Avard, Christian (August 2, 2013). "Sculptor commissioned to complete Joe Frazier statue has died". Barre Montpelier Times Argus. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  4. ^ "The 2004 ESPY Awards - Fans to decide all 2004 ESPY Award winners". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  5. ^ "Committee is newly found". ESPN. February 3, 1999. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  6. ^ a b "New categories unveiled for The 2002 ESPY Awards" (Press release). ESPN. 2002. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  7. ^ Wolfe, Josh (October 8, 2015). "Trailblazer Erik Weihenmayer Finds Blindness No Barrier To Adventure". Forbes. Archived from the original on December 26, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  8. ^ a b Ojeda, Francisco (July 29, 2003). "Despite a childhood accident, Marlon Shirley seems like he was... ...BORN TO RUN – World's fastest amputee is inspirational". The Oklahoman. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Morales, Tatiana (December 9, 2004). "The Heart Of A Champion". CBS News. Archived from the original on March 10, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  10. ^ "Kyle Maynard wins second ESPY". Gwinnett Daily Post. July 10, 2012. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  11. ^ Meznarich, Paul (June 11, 2002). "Paralympians Nominated For ESPY Award" (Press release). United States Quad Rugby Association. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  12. ^ "The 2003 ESPY Awards – Best Disabled Athlete nominees". ESPN. 2003. Archived from the original on June 4, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  13. ^ "Paralympic Medalist, Travis Mohr, Nominated for ESPY Award: Vote for Him!". Swimming World. June 26, 2004. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2018.