Biscochos, also known as biscochos de huevo, or biscotios, are a traditional Sephardi Jewish ring-shaped cookie commonly prepared for Hanukkah, Purim, and other Jewish holidays.[1]

Overview

Biscochos are a small ring-shaped twice-baked cookie with a crisp texture, similar to an abadi cookie, with a dough typically containing flour, oil, sugar, orange juice, vanilla or anise extract. The cookies are often topped with either cinnamon sugar[2] or coated with an egg wash and topped with sesame seeds.[3]

History

Biscochos originated in the Sephardi Jewish community of Spain, and after the Inquisition in the 15th century, biscochos migrated with the surviving Sephardi Jews fleeing Spain to the Maghreb, the Middle East, and Turkey.[4] With the arrival of Sephardi Jews to the United States, as well as the expulsion of Sephardim from Middle Eastern countries in 1949, and their subsequent refuge in Israel; bischochos are now more commonly found in these two countries.[5]

Preparation

According to Jonathan Arogeti, who bakes biscochos at his synagogue in Atlanta, Georgia, "The dough needs to be rolled out pencil thin before it is twisted and made into the signature circle shape, the older generation always checks and makes sure that each strand of dough is not too thick.[6]"

Popularity

Biscochos are popular among those in the Sephardi Jewish community, and are most frequently consumed during Hanukkah[7] and Purim,[8] among other Jewish holidays.

Popularity in the United States

Biscochos de huevo are prepared by Sephardic Jewish Americans for special occasions and holidays. Congregants of the Or VeShalom Congregation, a Sephardi synagogue in Atlanta, Georgia, prepare biscochos for the synagogue's "Hanukkah Bazaar", an annual event which has been hosted by the synagogue since 1972. The event celebrates Hanukkah and offers various Sephardi cookies, pastries and other baked goods baked by their congregation. Or VeShalom's variant of this cookie is topped with cinnamon sugar.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sephardic Hanukkah Cookies Bring Community Together". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  2. ^ "Sephardic Hanukkah Cookies Bring Community Together". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  3. ^ "Sephardic Biscochos". Leah Cooks Kosher. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  4. ^ "Biscochos- a Sephardic Tea Biscuit". The Boureka Diary. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  5. ^ Marks, Gil. The Encyclopedia of Jewish Food.
  6. ^ "Sephardic Hanukkah Cookies Bring Community Together". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  7. ^ "Sephardic Hanukkah Cookies Bring Community Together". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  8. ^ "Sephardic cookies for Purim". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  9. ^ "Sephardic Hanukkah Cookies Bring Community Together". My Jewish Learning. Retrieved 8 December 2019.