The Blackburn Takeover is a student protest at Howard University in Washington, D.C. that started on October 12, 2021, to protest poor housing conditions. Leaders in this protest include Aniyah Vines, Deja Redding, Jasmine Joof, Lettirose Cargill, Cherelle Muhammad, Tyler Davis, and Elishabeth Cunningham. The #BlackburnTakeover went viral on social media platforms including Instagram and Twitter. The Live Movement, which is a HBCU coalition, helped in this protest by amplifying the protest.[1] A primary complaint of the protesters include mold, mice, flooding and substandard living conditions in residential buildings on campus. Around 150 students have erected a tent city outside of the Blackburn University Center, demanding an improvement in living conditions and representation on the university's board of trustees.[2][3]

The students have 4 demands which are as follows:

  1. A town hall with President Frederick and the entire student body.
  2. Student trustee positions are to be permanently reinstated on to the Board of Trustees of Howard University.
  3. A comprehensive housing plan to remedy all issues plaguing on campus and off campus housing.
  4. Academic, legal, and disciplinary immunity for all of the protestors involved.

Reaction

The university claimed that as a result of the protest, Sodexho food service employees of the Blackburn café were laid off.[4]

A number of prominent figures came out in support of the student protest.[4]

References

  1. ^ Richardson, Randi (October 26, 2021). "Howard students protest over mold, mildew, mice and other poor housing conditions". TODAY.com. Archived from the original on 2021-10-26.
  2. ^ Williams, Elliot C. (October 23, 2021). "Howard University Protest Continues For 10 Consecutive Days, Into Homecoming Weekend". Deist. Archived from the original on 2021-10-23.
  3. ^ Pusatory, Matt; Arnold, Jess (October 13, 2021). "Howard University students stage sit-in over board representation, housing issues". wusa9.com. Archived from the original on 2021-10-13.
  4. ^ a b "Howard University President Addresses Housing Issues, Stops Short Of Meeting Protesters' Demands". DCist. Retrieved 2021-11-08.