Booth Theatre
Booth Theatre (48295953591).jpg
Address222 West 45th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′30″N 73°59′13″W / 40.7584°N 73.9870°W / 40.7584; -73.9870Coordinates: 40°45′30″N 73°59′13″W / 40.7584°N 73.9870°W / 40.7584; -73.9870
Public transitSubway: Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal
OwnerShubert and Booth Theatre, LLC
OperatorThe Shubert Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity800[1]
ProductionFor Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf
Construction
OpenedOctober 16, 1913
Years active1913–present
ArchitectHenry Beaumont Herts
Website
Official website
DesignatedNovember 4, 1987[2]
Reference no.1321[2]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedNovember 4, 1987[3]
Reference no.1322[3]
Designated entityLobby and auditorium interior

The Booth Theatre is a Broadway theater at 222 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1913, the theater was designed by Henry Beaumont Herts in the Italian Renaissance style and was built for the Shubert brothers. The venue was originally operated by Winthrop Ames, who named it for 19th-century American actor Edwin Booth. It has 800 seats across two levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. The facade and parts of the interior are New York City landmarks.

The Booth's facade is made of brick and terracotta, with sgraffito decorations designed in stucco. Three arches face north onto 45th Street, and a curved corner faces east toward Broadway. To the east, the Shubert Alley facade includes doors to the lobby and the stage house. The auditorium contains an orchestra level, one balcony, box seats, and a coved ceiling. The walls are decorated with wooden paneling with windows above, an unusual design for Broadway theaters, and there is an elliptical proscenium arch at the front of the auditorium. The stage house to the south is shared with the Shubert Theatre, and a gift shop occupies some of the former dressing rooms.

The Shubert brothers developed the Booth and Shubert theaters as their first venues on the block. It opened on October 16, 1913, with Arnold Bennett's play The Great Adventure. Ames leased the theater and showed many of his own productions until 1932, when the Shuberts took over. Many of the Booth's initial productions had short runs, particularly in the 1930s, but longer runs began to predominate by the 1940s. Long-running productions have included Luv, Butterflies Are Free, That Championship Season, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf, and The Elephant Man.

Site

Drawing of the theater's site in 1916. The Shubert and Booth theaters are at upper left.
Drawing of the theater's site in 1916. The Shubert and Booth theaters are at upper left.

The Booth Theatre is on 224 West 45th Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Seventh Avenue, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[4] It shares a land lot with the Shubert Theatre directly to the south, though the theaters are separate buildings.[5][6] The lot covers 25,305 square feet (2,350.9 m2), with a frontage of 126 feet (38 m) on 44th and 45th Streets and 200.83 feet (61 m) on Shubert Alley to the east.[5] The Booth Theatre building takes up 90 feet (27 m) of the Shubert Alley frontage.[7][8]

The Booth is part of the largest concentration of Broadway theaters on a single block.[9] It adjoins six other theaters: the Majestic and Broadhurst to the southwest; the John Golden, Bernard B. Jacobs, and Gerald Schoenfeld to the west; and the Shubert to the south. Other nearby structures include the Row NYC Hotel to the west; the Music Box Theatre and Imperial Theatre to the north; One Astor Plaza to the east; 1501 Broadway to the southeast; and the Hayes Theater and St. James Theatre one block south.[5] The Broadhurst, Schoenfeld (originally Plymouth), Booth, and Shubert theaters were all developed by the Shubert brothers between 44th and 45th Streets, occupying land previously owned by the Astor family.[10][11] The Shuberts bought the land under all four theaters from the Astors in 1948.[11][12]

The Shubert and Booth theaters were developed as a pair and are the oldest theaters on the block.[13][14] The site was previously occupied by several houses on 44th and 45th Street.[15] The adjacent Shubert Alley, built along with the Shubert and Booth theaters,[16][17] was originally a 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) fire escape passage.[18] Shubert Alley's presence not only allowed the theaters to meet fire regulations[19][20] but also enabled the structures to be designed as corner lots.[6] Originally, the theaters faced the Hotel Astor, now the location of One Astor Plaza, across the alley.[10][21] Another private alley runs to the west, between the Booth/Shubert and Broadhurst/Schoenfeld theaters.[22] The Broadhurst and Schoenfeld were also built as a pair, occupying land left over from the development of the Shubert and Booth; these too are designed with curved corners facing Broadway.[23]

Design

The Booth Theatre was designed by Henry Beaumont Herts and constructed in 1913 for the Shubert brothers.[4][24] Herts was an experienced theatrical architect and had previously led the firm of Herts & Tallant, which designed such theaters as the Lyceum, the New Amsterdam, and the Liberty.[25][26] The Shubert and Booth theaters are within separate buildings and differ in their interior designs and functions,[7][27] although they have adjacent stage areas near the center of the block.[6] The Shubert was the larger house, intended to be suitable for musicals, and the Shubert family's offices were placed above the auditorium there.[28] By contrast, the Booth was intended to be smaller and more intimate.[29] The Booth Theatre is operated by The Shubert Organization.[30][31]

Facade

The facades of the two theaters are similar in arrangement, being designed in an Italian Renaissance style.[20][32] The structures both have curved corners facing Broadway, since most audience members reached the theaters from that direction.[6][33] The Booth's facade is made of white brick, laid in English-cross bondwork, as well as terracotta.[34][32] An early source described the theaters' facades as being made of white marble, with stucco and faience panels.[20] The main section of the theater is topped by a cornice with sheet-metal brackets designed to resemble theatrical masks.[34] A balustrade used to run above the cornice.[33] The western wall is plain and has a fire escape.[34] A critic for Architecture magazine wrote that Herts had "discovered an excellent motive for a single facade", although it "would perhaps have been more amusing" if the two theaters had contained different facades.[19]

According to the New-York Tribune, the theaters' use of hand-carved sgraffito for decoration made Herts "the first man to have used sgraffito for this purpose".[35] The sgraffito was used because of New York City building codes that prevented decorations from projecting beyond their lot lines.[36][37][38] These decorations were colored light-gray, placed on a purple-gray background.[39][40] The sgraffito on the two theaters is one of the few such examples that remain in New York City. A contemporary source said the theaters' facades were "free from much of the gaudy trappings that has made some of the recent playhouses commonplace in appearance".[37]

45th Street

Cartouche above the Booth Theatre's entrance
Cartouche above the Booth Theatre's entrance

At ground level, the 45th Street elevation contains a tall water table of painted stone, above which is a band with rusticated blocks of terracotta. There are three arches at the center of the facade, which provide an emergency exit from the lobby.[41][42] Each archway originally contained a pair of paneled wooden triple doors, but these have since been covered with posters. On either side of the arches are rectangular sign boards topped by broken segmental-arched pediments.[42] Within the archways above the doors are sgraffito paintings, which depict figures. These paintings are partially obscured by a modern marquee that is cantilevered from the wall above. The archways are surrounded by rusticated voissoirs.[43]

Above the archways, the theater's facade is made of brick. The words "The Booth Theatre" are placed above the arches in metal letters.[34] The brick section of the facade is surrounded by a stucco band of sgraffito decorations, which is painted beige and contains bas reliefs of classical-style foliate ornamentation. The extreme left (east) and right (west) ends of the facade contain vertical sequences of terracotta quoins; they have Corinthian-style capitals that are decorated with motifs of griffins and shields. The sgraffito band wraps along the top of the brick wall. Above that is a stucco wall section with sgraffito decorations, which depict grotesques holding swags and human figures holding urns and staffs. These sgraffito decorations alternate with octagonal terracotta panels. At the center of the stucco wall section is a terracotta aedicule with a heraldic cartouche, above which is a broken pediment.[41][34]

Northeast corner

Due to the theater's location at the corner of 45th Street and Shubert Alley, the northeast corner of the facade is curved.[33][34] This corner section has a doorway at the center, containing glass-and-metal doors; these are shielded by a canopy that extends to the curb on 44th Street. A sign board is to the west of the doorway.[34] There are stucco bas-relief panels on either side of the doorway, which contain foliate decorations. Above the doors is an entablature with a fluted panels and a broken pediment shaped like a segmental arch. The center of the broken pediment has an urn, while the sides of the pediment have carvings of dolphins.[41][34]

A brick wall rises from the doorway. Like on 45th Street, there are vertical quoins with Corinthian capitals on the left and right. At the top of the brick wall, there is a stucco frieze that originally contained sgraffito decorations. There is a window above the frieze, which is flanked by scrolls and console brackets. The window has a broken pediment with swags draped from a theatrical mask in the center. The top of the corner section has a cornice, above which is a metal sign.[41][34]

Shubert Alley

Shubert Alley facade, 2007
Shubert Alley facade, 2007

On Shubert Alley, the facade is divided into the stage house to the left (south) and the auditorium to the right (north). The auditorium section contains one set of glass-and-metal doors at the far right. Like the elevations on 45th Street and at the northeast corner, the right side of the auditorium facade contains vertical quoins topped by a Corinthian capital. Also similar to the 45th Street elevation, there is a brick wall section above the first floor, surrounded by a stucco sgraffito band with bas-reliefs. At the top of the brick wall is a stucco wall section, containing sgraffito decorations alternating with three octagonal terracotta panels.[34]

The stage house section (shared with the Shubert Theatre) is simpler in design, being made mainly of brick in English cross bond. The ground floor has doorways, metal panels, and sign boards. A band of quoins separates the stage house from the Shubert auditorium to the left and the Booth auditorium to the right. The second to fourth floors have one-over-one sash windows, while the fifth floor has a terracotta shield at the center. The top of the stage house contains a parapet, above which is a sgraffito panel surrounded by bricks.[34] The stage door is within this section.[31]

Interior

Lobby

The theater contains both a ticket lobby and a rectangular inner lobby.[44] The use of two lobbies, rather than a single space leading directly to the auditorium, was intended to reduce the air drafts and noise that entered the auditorium.[27][45] The inner lobby's east wall contains exits with molded doorways, above which are exit signs with cornices. The north wall of the inner lobby contains a niche with a bust of actor Edwin Booth, the theater's namesake.[44] This is a copy of a bust that was installed in the Players Club, where Booth was a member.[27][45] The west wall contains brass lighting sconces and doors to the auditorium. At the top of the walls is a Doric frieze. The inner lobby contains a coffered ceiling, with chandeliers hanging from each ceiling section.[44]

Auditorium

View of the auditorium's left wall from the stage. The walls contain wood paneling that rises to about two-thirds of the auditorium's height. The top third of the balcony walls contains elliptical arches with casement windows. The left boxes and balcony hang over the orchestra.
View of the auditorium's left wall from the stage. The walls contain wood paneling that rises to about two-thirds of the auditorium's height. The top third of the balcony walls contains elliptical arches with casement windows. The left boxes and balcony hang over the orchestra.

The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The auditorium is wider than its depth.[44] According to the Shubert Organization, the theater has 800 seats;[1] meanwhile, The Broadway League gives a figure of 766 seats[30] and Playbill cites 770 seats.[31] The physical seats are divided into 514 seats in the orchestra, 252 on the balcony, and 12 in the boxes. There are 22 standing-only spots, as well as 30 removable seats in the orchestra pit.[1] Originally, the orchestra had 445 seats while the balcony had 223.[46] The theater contains restrooms in the basement and on the orchestra level, as well as water fountains. The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible, but the balcony is not.[1][31]

The original decorative scheme was described as being gray and "rich mulberry".[27][45] The interior was also decorated with Booth memorabilia such as his favorite armchair, as well as posters and playbills of shows in which Booth had appeared.[27][33][45] Architecture magazine cited the Booth's interior as being "unusually good in design, tasteful, quiet and charming".[19]

Seating areas

The orchestra is accessed from doors on the rear, or east. The rear of the orchestra contains a promenade. Paneled piers support the balcony level and separate the promenade from the orchestra seating. The top of the orchestra promenade's walls contain a Doric-style frieze.[47] Brass lanterns hang from the promenade's ceiling.[48] The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage.[49] The balcony is also raked, and the rear of the balcony contains a promenade, similar to that on the orchestra.[49] The balcony promenade is demarcated by a frieze on its ceiling, which contains brass-and-crystal chandeliers. Archways, flanked by columns, lead between the balcony promenade and the balcony seating.[50] There is also a technical booth at the rear of the balcony.[48] At the front of the balcony level is a box on either side, supported by brackets.[49] The underside of the balcony contains wood paneling. The front railing of the balcony and boxes contains paneled sections with strapwork patterns; a light box is installed in front of the balcony railing.[50]

The orchestra has paneled wooden side walls, which curve inward toward the stage.[49] The paneled walls at orchestra level continue at balcony level, up to the height of the proscenium arch[47] (about two-thirds of the auditorium's height[51]). Above the paneling is a Doric-style frieze and cornice. At the top of the balcony walls are elliptical arches with casement windows above paneling;[47] there are three such windows on each wall.[51] Between these arches are wall sections, which contain wall sconces flanked by engaged columns.[47][51] An entablature runs across the wall sections and above the rear of the balcony seating.[47] The use of casement windows above paneled walls is an uncommon design feature among Broadway theaters.[50]

Other design features
View of the boxes on the right side of the auditorium
View of the boxes on the right side of the auditorium

Next to the boxes is an elliptical proscenium arch, which is surrounded by molded decorations.[49] The proscenium opening measures about 36 feet 2 inches (11.02 m) wide and 25 feet 1 inch (7.65 m) tall.[1] The sides of the proscenium arch are continuations of the wall paneling on the lowest two-thirds of the auditorium. The top of the proscenium opening contains a plasterwork, which is a continuation of the top third of the auditorium walls.[47] The depth of the auditorium to the proscenium is 29 feet 9 inches (9.07 m), while the depth to the front of the stage is 33 feet 4 inches (10.16 m).[1]

The coved ceiling rises above the entablature at the top of the auditorium's walls.[44][51] The coved ceiling is interrupted at several points by the arched openings on the side walls and at the rear of the balcony seating. At these locations, there are groined ceiling sections with molded borders. The primary section of the ceiling has a wide band of latticework, which is interrupted by four semicircles with plasterwork borders. The latticework band surrounds the central ceiling panel.[47] Four chandeliers hang from the ceiling.[48][51]

Other interior spaces

The dressing rooms are separated from the stages of each theater by a heavy fireproof wall.[35][52] The two theaters are separated from each other by a 2-foot-thick (0.61 m) wall.[53][54] A gift shop called One Shubert Alley opened between the Shubert and Booth theaters in 1979, within three of the Booth's former dressing rooms.[55] The emergency exits of both theaters were composed of "fire- and smoke-proof towers" rather than exterior fire escapes.[56]

History

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[57] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[58][59] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Shubert Theatre.[60] The venue was developed by the Shubert brothers of Syracuse, New York, who expanded downstate into New York City in the first decade of the 20th century.[61][62] After the death of Sam S. Shubert in 1905, his brothers Lee and Jacob J. Shubert expanded their theatrical operations significantly.[63][64] The brothers controlled a quarter of all plays and three-quarters of theatrical ticket sales in the U.S. by 1925.[61][65]

Meanwhile, Winthrop Ames, a member of a wealthy publishing family, did not enter the theatrical industry until 1905, when he was 34 years old.[66][67] After being involved in the development of two large venues, Boston's Castle Square Theatre and New York City's New Theatre, Ames decided to focus on erecting smaller venues during the Little Theatre Movement.[66]

Development and early years

Construction

Early view of the theater
Early view of the theater

As the Shuberts were developing theaters in the early 1910s, Ames was planning to build a replacement for the New Theatre. Though the New had been completed in 1909, Ames and the theater's founders saw the venue, on the Upper West Side, as being too large and too far away from Times Square.[68] The New Theatre's founders acquired several buildings at 219–225 West 44th Street and 218–230 West 45th Street in March 1911, for the construction of a "new New Theatre" there.[15] The theater would have contained a private alley to the east.[15] The project was canceled in December 1911, after the site had been cleared, when Ames announced he would build the Little Theatre (now the Hayes Theater) across 44th Street.[69][70] The New Theatre's founders cited the difficulty of finding a director for the new New Theatre, as well as possible competition with Ames's Little Theatre.[71]

In April 1912, Winthrop Ames and Lee Shubert decided to lease the site of the new New Theatre from the Astor family.[71][72] Two theaters would be built on the site, along with a private alley to their east.[71][72] Shubert's theater was to be the larger venue, being on 44th Street, while Ames's theater would be on 45th Street and would have half the seating capacity.[56][73][74] The larger theater was known as the Sam S. Shubert Theatre, in memory of Lee's late brother, while the smaller one was named after Edwin Booth.[74][75] The Booth Theatre became the second New York City venue to bear Booth's name, after Booth's Theatre at 23rd Street and Sixth Avenue, completed in 1869 for Booth himself.[76] In the planning stages, the Booth Theatre on 45th Street was named the Ames Theatre.[74] In September 1912, Ames indicated that he would call the theater the Gotham;[74][77] the name was in use until at least August 1913.[74][78] Ultimately, Ames named his 45th Street theater after Booth because Ames's father had worked directly for Booth at the old theater.[27]

Documents indicate that several architects were consulted for the theaters' design, including Clarence H. Blackall, before the Shuberts hired Henry B. Herts for the job.[74] An "ice palace" was also planned on the site now occupied by the Broadhurst and Schoenfeld theaters.[74][79] Work on the two theaters started in May 1912.[20][56] The next month, the new-building application for the New Theatre (which had been filed in 1911) was withdrawn, and two new-building applications for Shubert's and Ames's theaters were filed.[80] Herts began accepting bids for construction contractors that July,[81] and the Fleischmann Bros. Company was selected the following month to construct both of the new theaters.[82] The project encountered several delays and disputes over costs. Documents indicate that the Fleischmann Bros. had expressed concerns of imprecise drawings and fired several workers.[83] Further delays occurred when Ames requested several changes to the Booth's design in mid-1912; Herts said this would require the plans to be completely redone, while J. J. Shubert believed the changes were superficial.[84]

Ames operation

Ames wanted to operate the new theater as an intimate venue that was "large enough to make possible the usual scale of orchestra and balcony prices".[85] The Booth was supposed to open on October 10, 1913, but its opening was postponed by six days[86] because a heavy rain flooded the basement.[87] The theater opened on October 16 with the Arnold Bennett play The Great Adventure with Lyn Harding and Janet Beecher;[88][89] it closed after 52 performances.[90][91] At the time, there were just two other theaters on the surrounding blocks: the Little Theatre and the now-demolished Weber and Fields' Music Hall.[18] The first successful production at the Booth was Experience with William Elliott, which opened in late 1914[92][93] and continued for 255 performances.[90][94] Ames also hosted a competition for the best play on an American subject by an American writer; he awarded the $10,000 prize to Alice Brown's play Children of Earth, which was shown at the Booth in January 1915.[95][96] That April, the theater hosted The Bubble with Louis Mann,[92][97] which had 176 performances.[98][99]

The Booth hosted numerous moderately successful plays by notable playwrights in the late 1910s.[96] Among these were George Bernard Shaw's Getting Married in 1916, featuring Henrietta Crosman and William Faversham.[100][101] Another successful play arrived at the Booth in early 1917 with the opening of Clare Kummer's A Successful Calamity with William Gillette, Estelle Winwood, and Roland Young.[102][103][104] De Luxe Annie opened later the same year, featuring Jane Grey and Vincent Serrano.[98][105][106] The play Seventeen, based on a Booth Tarkington novel, opened at the Booth in 1918 with Ruth Gordon and Gregory Kelly.[102][107][108] This was followed in 1919 by the mystery The Woman in Room 13[109][110] and the W. Somerset Maugham comedy Too Many Husbands.[109][111][112]

In 1920, the Booth hosted the melodrama The Purple Mask with Leo Ditrichstein;[113][114][115] the play Not So Long Ago with Eva Le Gallienne, Sidney Blackmer, and Thomas Mitchell;[116][117] and a dramatization of Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper with Ruth Findlay and William Faversham.[118][119] The next year, the play The Green Goddess opened with George Arliss,[120][121][122] staying for 440 performances.[113][a] A. A. Milne's play The Truth About Blayds opened at the theater in 1922, featuring O. P. Heggie, Leslie Howard, Frieda Inescort, and Ferdinand Gottschalk.[113][123][124] Seventh Heaven premiered later the same year,[120][125] running for 683 performances.[113][126] In 1924, the Booth hosted Dancing Mothers with Helen Hayes, Mary Young, and Henry Stephenson.[127][128] This was followed shortly thereafter by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber's play Minick,[129][130] as well as the Theatre Guild's version of Ferenc Molnár's play The Guardsman with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne.[131][132]

Many productions at the Booth in 1925 and 1926 were flops.[133] Among the Booth's productions in 1925 were Horace Liveright's revival of Shakespeare's Hamlet with Basil Sydney and Helen Chandler,[129][134][135] as well as the comedy The Patsy with Claiborne Foster.[129][136] The next year, Ames produced a short-lived version of Philip Barry's comedy White Wings.[129][137] The Booth finally had another hit in early 1927 with the Maxwell Anderson comedy Saturday's Children with Beulah Bondi, Ruth Gordon, and Roger Pryor,[129][138] which had 310 performances.[96][139] Also that year, Leslie Howard and Frieda Inescort returned in Ames's production of John Galsworthy's Escape.[96][140][141] The revue Grand Street Follies was presented at the Booth in 1928 and 1929, with James Cagney and Dorothy Sands.[142][143] Ames announced his retirement from producing in October 1929, though he said he would continue to control the Booth Theatre.[144] The same month, the play Jenny opened at the theater, featuring Jane Cowl and Guy Standing.[145][146]

Shubert operation

1930s and 1940s

Canopy
Canopy

The Booth hosted about fifty productions in the 1930s. Though the theater was always quickly rebooked because of its location in the center of the Theater District, many of these shows were short-lived or relocated from other venues.[147] One of the more notable short runs was Elmer Harris's A Modern Virgin in 1931, in which Margaret Sullavan performed for the first time on a Broadway stage.[148][149] This was followed in 1932 by Another Language,[148][150] starring John Beal, Margaret Hamilton, Dorothy Stickney, and Margaret Wycherly for 348 performances.[151] That year, Ames gave up his management of the Booth entirely, and the Shuberts took over.[152][153] In 1934, the theater hosted some moderate successes such as No More Ladies,[154][155][156] The Shining Hour,[154][157][158] and The Distaff Side.[154][159][160] The Booth's plays in 1935 included J. B. Priestley's Laburnum Grove;[161][162] John Gearon and Louis Bromfield's short-lived De Luxe;[163][164] Edward Chodorov's Kind Lady with Grace George;[163][165][166] and James Warwick's Blind Alley with George Coulouris.[163][167] This was followed in 1936 by the Chinese drama Lady Precious Stream;[168][169] Sweet Aloes, where Rex Harrison premiered on Broadway;[170][171] and the wrestling farce Swing Your Lady.[172][173]

George Kaufman and Moss Hart's You Can't Take It with You, with Josephine Hull and Henry Travers, premiered in December 1936[174][175] and stayed for 837 performances, winning a Pulitzer Prize.[176][177] It was followed by Patricia Collinge's drama Dame Nature[176][178] and Philip Barry's drama Here Come the Clowns in 1938,[176][179] as well as the Nancy Hamilton and Morgan Lewis revue One for the Money in 1939.[176][180] Another Pulitzer-winning play, The Time of Your Life, opened at the Booth in late 1939.[174][181][182] The Booth's productions in the 1940s generally lasted for longer than in the previous decade.[183] In 1940, Hamilton and Lewis brought to the Booth the revue Two for the Show, a sequel to One for the Money that featured many of the same performers.[176][184] This was followed in February 1941 by the Rose Franken play Claudia with Dorothy McGuire, Frances Starr, and Donald Cook,[174][185] running for one year.[186][187] The Noël Coward comedy Blithe Spirit, featuring Mildred Natwick, Clifton Webb, and Peggy Wood, moved to the Booth in May 1942[188][189] and ran until the next June.[190][191] Another long run was The Two Mrs. Carrolls, which opened in 1943 with Elisabeth Bergner, Victor Jory, and Irene Worth[192] and had 585 performances.[193][194]

Ralph Nelson's drama The Wind Is Ninety appeared at the Booth in 1945,[193][195] followed by Tennessee Williams and Donald Windham's comedy You Touched Me!.[193][196] The next year, the theater hosted a revival of The Would-Be Gentleman;[197][198] the mystery Swan Song;[199][200] and a revival of The Playboy of the Western World.[201][202] Among the Booth's productions in 1947 were the Norman Krasna play John Loves Mary, which featured Tom Ewell, Nina Foch, and William Prince.[203][204][205] The following year, Molnár's comedy The Play's the Thing was revived, featuring Louis Calhern and Faye Emerson.[206][207] James B. Allardice's At War with the Army was presented in 1949 with Gary Merrill,[208][209] and The Velvet Glove opened at the end of that year with Grace George and Walter Hampden.[199][210]

1950s to 1970s

View from across 45th Street
View from across 45th Street

William Inge's play Come Back, Little Sheba opened in 1950, featuring Shirley Booth and Sidney Blackmer;[211][212] it was Inge's first Broadway production.[213][214] Another hit was Beatrice Lillie's revue An Evening with Beatrice Lillie in 1952,[213][215] which ran for 278 performances.[216][217] Afterward, the Booth hosted the world premiere of the film Caesar in 1953, the first non-legitimate production in t he theater's history.[218][219] The Booth's next success was a ten-month run of Jerome Chodorov's Anniversary Waltz with Macdonald Carey and Kitty Carlisle, which had relocated from the Broadhurst, starting in late 1954.[220][221] Ralph Berkey and Henry Denker's Korean War drama Time Limit opened in 1956 and ran for 127 performances.[220][222] Gore Vidal's comedy Visit to a Small Planet opened the next February,[223][224] starring Cyril Ritchard and Eddie Mayehoff for a year.[220][225] Subsequently, William Gibson's two-person play Two for the Seesaw opened in January 1958[226][227] and ran until late 1959.[220][228]

Paddy Chayefsky's play The Tenth Man launched at the Booth in November 1959[229] and lasted for 623 performances over the next year.[220][230] The play Julia, Jake and Uncle Joe with Claudette Colbert closed after its single performance in January 1961,[231] but the comedy A Shot in the Dark was more successful the same year, starring Julie Harris, Walter Matthau, Gene Saks, and William Shatner.[232][233][234] A comedy by Murray Schisgal, Luv, opened in 1964 and featured Alan Arkin, Anne Jackson, and Eli Wallach;[235][236] it ran for about 900 performances.[237][238] The comedy duo Flanders and Swann performed their revue At the Drop of Another Hat at the Booth in 1966, following the success of At the Drop of a Hat.[237][239][240] The next year, Harold Pinter's play The Birthday Party was staged at the theater.[237][241][242] After several relatively short runs,[243] the Booth hosted the Leonard Gershe play Butterflies Are Free,[244][245] which had 1,128 performances through 1972.[246][247]

The Booth's first new production of the 1970s was Joseph Papp's version of Jason Miller's Pulitzer-winning play That Championship Season.[244] The show moved from The Public Theater in September 1972[248][249] and ran for 844 performances over the next year and a half.[250][251] Subsequently, in 1974, the Booth hosted a transfer of Terrence McNally's off-Broadway play Bad Habits,[246][252][253] as well as the Schisgal play All Over Town.[246][254] The next year, Papp announced that he would produce five plays at the Booth under the auspices of the New York Shakespeare Festival, offering tickets at low prices.[255] Papp canceled the program due to a lack of money,[256][257] and only one production was staged, the short-lived The Leaf People.[258][259] This was followed by the Jerome Kern musical Very Good Eddie at the end of 1975.[246][260][261] Another hit was For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf, which opened in 1976[244][262] and ran for 742 performances over the next two years.[263][264][265]

In 1979, the Shuberts hired Melanie Kahane to redesign the Booth Theatre.[266] The project involved restoring the Booth's original design within three weeks; at the time, Kahane characterized the theater as a "sad old sack".[267] Kahane removed some design details such as French chandeliers, as she believed they were incompatible with the theater's design scheme. The auditorium was redecorated with a beige and brown color scheme.[267] In addition, three former dressing rooms were converted into the One Shubert Alley store.[55][267] The Booth ended the decade with a transfer of Bernard Pomerance's off-Broadway play The Elephant Man, which opened in 1979[244] and stayed for 916 performances.[263][268]

1980s and 1990s

The facade as seen from across 45th Street in the morning
The facade as seen from across 45th Street in the morning

Bill C. Davis's play Mass Appeal transferred to the Booth from off-Broadway in 1981, starring Michael O'Keefe and Milo O'Shea.[269][270][271] The Royal Shakespeare Company presented the C. P. Taylor play Good with Alan Howard in 1982,[269][272][273] and Larry Atlas's Total Abandon flopped the next year after its single performance.[274][275] This was followed in 1984 by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's Pulitzer-winning musical Sunday in the Park With George with Mandy Patinkin and Bernadette Peters.[269][276][277] The Herb Gardner play I'm Not Rappaport relocated to the Booth from off-Broadway in November 1985,[278][279] staying for 890 performances until early 1988.[280] The final hit of the decade was Shirley Valentine, which opened in 1989 and had 324 performances.[281][282]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Booth as an official city landmark in 1982,[283] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[284] The LPC designated both the facade and the interior of the Booth as landmarks on November 4, 1987.[285][286] This was part of the LPC's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[287] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[288] The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Booth, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[289] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[290]

In October 1990, Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty's musical Once on This Island launched at the Booth,[291][292] running for 469 performances.[293][294] This was followed in 1992 by Frank Loesser's The Most Happy Fella for 221 performances,[295][296] as well as Frank McGuinness's play Someone Who'll Watch Over Me for 216 performances.[297][298] Jonathan Tolins's play The Twilight of the Golds had a short run in late 1993,[299][300] as did Arthur Miller's Broken Glass in 1994.[301][302] At the end of 1994, the Booth hosted a limited run of A Tuna Christmas.[303][304] The next year, the Booth hosted Emily Mann's production of Having Our Say,[305][306] which ran for 308 performances.[307] The Booth next hosted two solo shows:[308] Love Thy Neighbor by Jackie Mason in 1996,[309][310] as well as Defending the Caveman by Rob Becker (later replaced by Michael Chiklis).[311][312] David Mamet's set of three one-act plays, The Old Neighborhood, ran 197 performances at the Booth in late 1997 and early 1998.[313][314] The revue An Evening with Jerry Herman[315][316] and Sandra Bernhard's stand-up routine I'm Still Here... Damn It! were staged in 1998,[317][318] followed by David Hare's Via Dolorosa[319][320] and Barry Humphries's Dame Edna: The Royal Tour in 1999.[321][322]

2000s to present

The Glass Menagerie at the Booth Theatre in 2013
The Glass Menagerie at the Booth Theatre in 2013

Lily Tomlin performed her solo show The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe in 2000,[323][324] followed by another solo show in 2002, Bea Arthur's Bea Arthur on Broadway.[325][326] A 2002 revival of I'm Not Rappaport closed after 51 performances,[327][328] and Thornton Wilder's play Our Town was revived the same year.[329][330] The Retreat from Moscow opened in 2003 for a 148-performance run,[331][332] and Eve Ensler's solo The Good Body flopped after a month in 2004.[333][334] Next was the drama The Pillowman and a revival of Edward Albee's Seascape in 2005, then revivals of Faith Healer and Butley in 2006. Joan Didion's solo play The Year of Magical Thinking and Conor McPherson's drama The Seafarer both had runs of several months in 2007, and Laurence Fishburne also headed the solo drama Thurgood for over a hundred performances in 2008.[30][333] By contrast, Horton Foote's Dividing the Estate ran for only one and a half months in late 2008,[335][336] and the musical The Story of My Life had five performances in 2009.[337][338]

The play Next to Normal opened at the Booth in April 2009 and ran until January 2011.[339][340] After a seven-performance run of the play High at the theater in April 2011,[341][342] a longer run of Other Desert Cities premiered later that year.[343][344] Generally, the Booth hosted straight plays during the 2010s. These included Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in 2012, I'll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers and The Glass Menagerie in 2013, and The Velocity of Autumn and The Elephant Man in 2014.[30][31] Hand to God was the most successful production during this time, opening in 2015 and running for 337 performances.[345][346] Other plays at the Booth included Hughie, An Act of God, and Les Liaisons Dangereuses in 2016; Significant Other and Meteor Shower in 2017; and The Boys in the Band and American Son in 2018.[30][31]

The Booth hosted Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus during early 2019,[347][348] followed later the same year by a limited run of Freestyle Love Supreme.[349][350] The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City.[351] A revival of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which had only played previews at the Booth before the shutdown, was then canceled.[352][353] The Booth reopened on October 7, 2021, with a limited run of Freestyle Love Supreme,[354][355] which closed in January 2022.[356] A revival of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf opened at the Booth in April 2022.[357][358]

Box office record

Bette Midler set a box-office record in I'll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers with a gross of US$865,144 in May 2013.[359] The Elephant Man, starring Bradley Cooper, topped Midler's record by grossing US$1,058,547 for an eight-performance week ending December 28, 2014.[360] The current record is held by The Boys in the Band. The production grossed US$1,152,649 over eight performances for the week ending August 12, 2018.[361]

Notable productions

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ The Broadway League gives a different figure of 175 performances.
  2. ^ Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the revival of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? did not officially open at the Booth Theatre; it only played previews.[353]

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Booth Theatre". Shubert Organization. October 16, 1913. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  4. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 298. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  5. ^ a b c "222 West 45 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Archived from the original on January 26, 2022. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  7. ^ a b "Forbes-Robertson Reception To-day; Famous English Actor and Wife to be Honored at New Shubert Theatre". The New York Times. September 29, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  8. ^ "The Shubert Theater on 44th Street and the Booth Theater on 45th Street, New York". Architecture and Building. Vol. 45. W.T. Comstock Company. November 1913. p. 467.
  9. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  10. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 37.
  11. ^ a b "Shuberts Buy Sites of Four of Their Theaters: Get Broadhurst, Plymouth, Shubert and Booth Land From W. W. Astor Estate". New York Herald Tribune. November 10, 1948. p. 14. ProQuest 1335171969.
  12. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 10, 1948). "Shuberts Acquire 4 Broadway Sites; Purchase Choice Theatre Plots From William Astor Estate for Reported $3,500,000". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 20, 2022.
  13. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 37; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  14. ^ Morrison 1999, p. 103.
  15. ^ a b c "New Theatre Moves to Times Square; Site Adjoining the Hotel Astor Chosen for the New Building -- To be Ready in 1912". The New York Times. March 18, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  16. ^ Calta, Louis (October 3, 1963). "50 Years Marked in Shubert Alley; The Shuberts' Celebrated Alley Observes a Birthday". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  17. ^ "Shubert Alley Celebrates 50th". The Journal News. October 2, 1963. p. 35. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  18. ^ a b Chach 2014, p. 46.
  19. ^ a b c "The Booth and the Shubert Theatres". Architecture. Vol. 28. 1913. p. 111.
  20. ^ a b c d "Two More Playhouses: Work Begun on New Theatres in West 44th and 45th Streets". New-York Tribune. May 27, 1912. p. 3. ProQuest 574907446.
  21. ^ Morrison 1999, p. 105.
  22. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 86.
  23. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 37; Morrison 1999, p. 103.
  24. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 15–16.
  25. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  26. ^ "H. B. Herts Dead; Noted Architect; His Invention of Arch Design for Theatres Eliminated Balcony Pillars". The New York Times. March 28, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  27. ^ a b c d e f "New Booth Theatre: Winthrop Ames's New Playhouse Opens Next Week". New-York Tribune. October 5, 1913. p. B6. ProQuest 575134472.
  28. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 79; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  29. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  30. ^ a b c d e The Broadway League (October 2, 1913). "Booth Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c d e f "Booth Theatre (1913) New York, NY". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  32. ^ a b Morrison 1999, p. 87.
  33. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 21.
  35. ^ a b "New Shubert Theatre: Description of Playhouse to Open With Forbes-Robertson". New-York Tribune. September 28, 1913. p. B6. ProQuest 575116917.
  36. ^ American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 961).
  37. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  38. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35.
  39. ^ Chach 2014, p. 48.
  40. ^ American Architect and Architecture 1913, plate (document page 965).
  41. ^ a b c d Morrison 1999, p. 88.
  42. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 20.
  43. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 20–21.
  44. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 20.
  45. ^ a b c d "Bennett Comedy to Open Booth Theater in New York: Dollars and Sense" a Baseball Play". The Christian Science Monitor. October 11, 1913. p. 14. ProQuest 194062352.
  46. ^ "The Booth Theatre: Some Notes on the Decoration of Mr. Ames's Playhouse". New-York Tribune. October 12, 1913. p. B7. ProQuest 575154966.
  47. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 21.
  48. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 22.
  49. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 20–21.
  50. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 21–22.
  51. ^ a b c d e Morrison 1999, p. 89.
  52. ^ "Forbes-Robertson Reception To-day; Famous English Actor and Wife to be Honored at New Shubert Theatre". The New York Times. September 29, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  53. ^ Shubert Theater (PDF) (Report). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. December 15, 1987. p. 15. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  54. ^ "Architecture and Building". Vol. 45. W.T. Comstock Company. November 1913. p. 467. ((cite magazine)): Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  55. ^ a b Robinson, Ruth (August 14, 1979). "A Shop That Says: Regards to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  56. ^ a b c "Two New Theatres in the Times Square District". The New York Times. May 27, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  57. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  58. ^ "Theater District –". New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  59. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  60. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  61. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  62. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 208.
  63. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 9.
  64. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 75.
  65. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 217.
  66. ^ a b "Winthrop Ames, 66, Producer, is Dead; One of Important Forces for Many Years in American Theatre's Development". The New York Times. November 4, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  67. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 7–8.
  68. ^ "Ames's Playhouse in Times Square; Former Director of New Theatre May Build in 46th Street Smallest Theatre in City". The New York Times. September 9, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  69. ^ "Founders Abandon the New Theatre; Decide After Razing Buildings in West 44th Street It Would Not Be Wise to Build". The New York Times. December 21, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  70. ^ "New Theatre Abandoned: Founders Believe It Unwise to Proceed With Enterprise Had Bought New Site Founders Opened First Playhouse in 1909, and Many New Plays Were Produced There". New-York Tribune. December 21, 1911. p. 7. ProQuest 574855982.
  71. ^ a b c "Two Theatres on New Theatre Site; Shubert and Ames Get Large Plot in West 44th Street, Back of Hotel Astor". The New York Times. April 2, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  72. ^ a b "Senator Williams, Lecturer". New-York Tribune. April 2, 1912. p. 7. ProQuest 574913550.
  73. ^ "The Amusement Week in New York: Up and Down Broadway". The Billboard. Vol. 24, no. 20. May 18, 1912. p. 20. ProQuest 1031437440.
  74. ^ a b c d e f g Chach 2014, p. 47.
  75. ^ "New Theaters for New York: Last Year's Record Not Quite Equalled a Now Shubert House and One for Winthrop Ames "the Lure" and "the Fight" Continue in Limelight". The Hartford Courant. September 12, 1913. p. 7. ProQuest 556023582.
  76. ^ "An Edwin Booth Theater for New York". Outlook. Vol. 104, no. 15. August 9, 1913. p. 787. ProQuest 136635165.
  77. ^ "Michigan Democrats Meet; Old State Committee Retains Its Hold on the Organization". The New York Times. September 27, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  78. ^ "With the Press Agents". Variety. Vol. 31, no. 9. August 1, 1913. p. 12. ProQuest 1529165398.
  79. ^ Gray, Christopher (July 3, 2014). "Shubert Alley: Star-Gazing, but Maybe Not on Mondays". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  80. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  81. ^ "Theatres". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 90, no. 2313. July 13, 1912. p. 76 – via columbia.edu.
  82. ^ "Theatres". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 90, no. 2317. August 10, 1912. p. 213 – via columbia.edu.
  83. ^ Chach 2014, pp. 47–48.
  84. ^ Chach 2014, p. 48.
  85. ^ "Theatre Old and New; Methods and Conditions in the Days of Booth as Compared with Those of the Modern Playhouse". The New York Times. October 26, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  86. ^ "Booth Theater Opening Postponed". The Billboard. Vol. 25, no. 41. October 11, 1913. p. 58. ProQuest 1031455572.
  87. ^ "The Booth Opens Oct. 16.; Water In Sub-Cellar Causes Postponement of 'The Great Adventure.'". The New York Times. October 4, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  88. ^ "Bennett Play Opens New Booth Theatre; But Though "The Great Adventure" Has Charm and Humor, It Doesn't Satisfy Completely". The New York Times. October 17, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  89. ^ ""the Great Adventure": Charming Comedy Opens the New Booth Theatre Janet Beecher Scores Arnold Bennett's Play of Art and Its Appreciation Well Received Janet Beecher and Lyn Happing in "the Great Adventure."'". New-York Tribune. October 17, 1913. p. 9. ProQuest 575153834.
  90. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  91. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 16, 1913). "The Great Adventure – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Great Adventure (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1913)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  92. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89.
  93. ^ "Hard Work in "Experience"". The New York Times. November 1, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  94. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1914). "Experience – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "Experience (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1914)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  95. ^ Turnbull, Hector (January 13, 1915). "A Prize Play at the Booth: "the Children of Earth," by Alice Brown, Is Presented Effie Shannon Is the Heroine a Truly American Drama That Is Splendidly Pictured and Played the Cast". New-York Tribune. p. 9. ProQuest 575339373.
  96. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  97. ^ "Pleasant Humor Fills 'The Bubble'; The Booth Houses a Homely Comedy of Delicatessen Earnings Become Frenzied". The New York Times. April 6, 1915. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  98. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  99. ^ The Broadway League (April 5, 1915). "The Bubble – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "The Bubble (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1915)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  100. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 6, 1916). "Getting Married – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Getting Married (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1916)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  101. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (November 12, 1916). "Second Thoughts on First Nights; " The Yellow Jacket"---"Getting Married"---Willie Howard---A Note on "Major Pendennis."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  102. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  103. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 5, 1917). "A Successful Calamity – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "A Successful Calamity (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1917)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  104. ^ "Gillette Returns in a Brilliant Play; "A Successful Calamity" a Delightful Successor to" Good Gracious Annabelle"". The New York Times. February 6, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  105. ^ The Broadway League (September 4, 1917). "De Luxe Annie – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "De Luxe Annie (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1917)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  106. ^ "A Novel Mystery in 'De Luxe Annie'; Exciting and Well-Knit Crook Play Based on Abnormal Psychology". The New York Times. September 5, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  107. ^ The Broadway League (January 22, 1918). "Seventeen – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "Seventeen (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1918)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  108. ^ "The Tragi-comedy of 'Seventeen'; Booth Tarkington's Study of Man's Futile Age in an Amusing Stage Version". The New York Times. January 22, 1918. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  109. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 89; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  110. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 14, 1919). "The Woman in Room 13 – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Woman in Room 13 (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1919)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  111. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1919). "Too Many Husbands – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Too Many Husbands (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1919)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  112. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (October 9, 1919). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  113. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 90; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  114. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 5, 1920). "The Purple Mask – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Purple Mask (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  115. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (January 6, 1920). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  116. ^ The Broadway League (May 4, 1920). "Not So Long Ago – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "Not So Long Ago (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  117. ^ "'Not So Long Ago' a Captivating Play; Little Comedy by Arthur Richman Tells of Life in New York in Early '70s". The New York Times. May 5, 1920. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  118. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 1, 1920). "The Prince and the Pauper – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "The Prince and the Pauper (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  119. ^ ""Prince and the Pauper"; Wm. Faversham Excels in Charming Play Made from Twain Story". The New York Times. November 2, 1920. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  120. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 90; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  121. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (January 19, 1921). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  122. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 18, 1921). "The Green Goddess – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Green Goddess (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1921)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  123. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 14, 1922). "The Truth About Blayds – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Truth About Blayds (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1922)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  124. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (March 15, 1922). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  125. ^ Corbin, John (October 31, 1922). "The Play; The Drama of Job". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  126. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 30, 1922). "Seventh Heaven – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Seventh Heaven (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1922)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  127. ^ "'Dancing Mothers' Has Novel Climax; Interesting, Although Stereotyped, Play by Selwyn and Goulding Shown at the Booth". The New York Times. August 12, 1924. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  128. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 11, 1924). "Dancing Mothers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "Dancing Mothers (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  129. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 90; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  130. ^ Hammond, Percy (September 25, 1924). "The Theaters: "Minick," a Comedy of Youth and an Old Man, Is One of the Theater's Very Best Phyllis Povah". The New York Herald, New York Tribune. p. 12. ProQuest 1113276814.
  131. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 1924). "The Guardsman – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "The Guardsman (Broadway, Garrick Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  132. ^ "'Guardsman' Molnars Latest Stage Satire". The Washington Post. February 1, 1925. p. S16. ISSN 0190-8286. ProQuest 149539924.
  133. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  134. ^ Anderson, Sherwood (November 15, 1925). "Hamlet in Modern Dress". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  135. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 1925). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Hamlet (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  136. ^ "The Patsy" Artistic and Highly Amusing; Barry Conners's Intelligent Play Aided by the Fine Performance of Claiborne Foster". The New York Times. December 24, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  137. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (October 16, 1926). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  138. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (January 27, 1927). "Marriage, Love, &c". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  139. ^ The Broadway League (January 26, 1927). "Saturday's Children – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
    "Saturday's Children (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  140. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 1927). "Escape – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Escape (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  141. ^ Hammond, Percy (October 27, 1927). "The Theaters: 'Escape, Another Adult and Interesting John Galsworthy Drama, Is Presented Successfully by Winthrop Ames at the Booth Theater Leslie Howard". New York Herald Tribune. p. 18. ProQuest 1113720534.
  142. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 90–91; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  143. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (May 2, 1929). "The Play; Follies, Grand Street Style". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  144. ^ "Winthrop Ames Quits as Producer; Decides to Leave Field in Which He Has Been Prominent for Twenty-five Years". The New York Times. October 1, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  145. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (October 9, 1929). "The Play; Jane Cowl and Guy Standing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  146. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 91; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  147. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 90.
  148. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 91; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  149. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (May 21, 1931). "The Play; Sex Still in the Ascendancy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  150. ^ "Theatrical Notes". The New York Times. April 25, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  151. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 25, 1932). "Another Language – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Another Language (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  152. ^ Allen, Kelcey (October 5, 1932). "Amusements: Winthrop Ames Now In Retirement". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 45, no. 67. p. 23. ProQuest 1654338664.
  153. ^ "Stokowski Plans Opera Revolution; Expects to Banish Orchestra and Singers From Sight of Audience of New 'Music Drama'". The New York Times. October 4, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  154. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 91; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  155. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 23, 1934). "No More Ladies – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "No More Ladies (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  156. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 24, 1934). "A.E. Thomas's New Drama Entitled "No More Ladies" -- Opening of "Mackerel Skies."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  157. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 13, 1934). "The Shining Hour – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Shining Hour (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  158. ^ "Theatrical Notes". The New York Times. February 13, 1934. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  159. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 25, 1934). "The Distaff Side – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Distaff Side (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  160. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 26, 1934). "The Play; Sybil Thorndike Appears in John Van Druten's Comedy of Women, 'The Distaff Side.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 14, 1935). "Laburnum Grove – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Laburnum Grove (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  162. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 15, 1935). "The Play; J.B. Priestley's Suburban Mystery Drama, 'Laburnum Grove,' With Edmund Gwenn". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  163. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  164. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 6, 1935). "The Play; End of an Epoch the Theme of 'De Luxe,' by Louis Bromfield and John Gearon". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  165. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 1935). "Kind Lady – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Kind Lady (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  166. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 24, 1935). "The Play; Grace George in 'Kind Lady,' a Melodrama From a Hugh Walpole Story". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  167. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 25, 1935). "The Play; Death to Gangsters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  168. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 27, 1936). "Lady Precious Stream – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Lady Precious Stream (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  169. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 28, 1936). "The Play; ' Lady Precious Stream,' by Dr. S.I. Hsiung, or the Poor Gardener Who Made Good". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  170. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  171. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 5, 1936). "Evelyn Laye in 'Sweet Aloes,' From England -- 'Chalk Dust,' a Drama About Education". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  172. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 18, 1936). "Swing Your Lady – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Swing Your Lady (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  173. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 19, 1936). "Wrestling Ring Rumpus in 'Swing Your Lady!' -- Opening of Samson Raphaelson's 'White Man.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  174. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  175. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 15, 1936). "The Play; 'You Can't Take It With You,' According to Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  176. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  177. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 14, 1936). "You Can't Take It With You – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "You Can't Take It With You (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  178. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 27, 1938). "The Play; Theatre Guild Season Opens With 'Dame Nature' Adapted From the French". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  179. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 8, 1938). "The Play; Philip Barry's 'Here Come the Clowns' Opens With Eddie Dowling Acting the Principal Part". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  180. ^ "'One for Money' Arrives Tonight; Hamilton-Lewis Revue Will Be at Booth--Brenda Forbes, Ruth Matteson in Cast". The New York Times. February 4, 1939. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  181. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 25, 1939). "The Time of Your Life – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Time of Your Life (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  182. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 26, 1939). "The Play; Saroyan's 'The Time of Your Life' Opener Theatre Guild's Twenty-second Season". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  183. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92.
  184. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 18, 1940). "'TWO FOR THE SHOW'; Miniature Vaudeville Confounds Reviewer By Observing Good Taste". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  185. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 13, 1941). "The Play; 'Claudia' Brings Rose Franken Back as Author and Introduces Dorothy McGuire as Actress". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  186. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 12, 1941). "Claudia – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Claudia (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  187. ^ "Canzoneri in Bow as Actor Tonight; Ex-Lightweight Champion to Play Killer Kane in 'They Should Have Stood in Bed'". The New York Times. February 13, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  188. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 92; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  189. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1941). "Blithe Spirit – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Blithe Spirit (Broadway, Morosco Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  190. ^ "Comedy by Coward Suspends Tonight; 'Blithe Spirit' to Halt After 650 Performances -- Will Resume on Labor Day". The New York Times. June 5, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  191. ^ "News of the Theater: 'Blithe Spirit' Closes Run at Booth Tonight After Its 650th Performance". New York Herald Tribune. June 5, 1943. p. 6. ProQuest 1268059241.
  192. ^ "Bergner Opening at Booth Tonight; Her Appearance in Melodrama, 'Two Mrs. Carrolls,' Will Be First Here in 8 Years". The New York Times. August 3, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  193. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  194. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 3, 1943). "The Two Mrs. Carrolls – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Two Mrs. Carrolls (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  195. ^ Nichols, Lewis (June 22, 1945). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  196. ^ Zolotow, Sam (September 25, 1945). "'You Touched Me' Arriving Tonight; Play by Tennessee Williams and Donald Windham to Open at Booth Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  197. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 9, 1946). "The Would-Be Gentleman – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Would-be Gentleman (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  198. ^ Zolotow, Sam (January 9, 1946). "Clark Will Essay Moliere Tonight; Comic in Own Interpretation of 'Would-Be Gentleman' at Booth Under Todd Aegis Show Halts, Miriam Hopkins Ill Schy to Produce Farce". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  199. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  200. ^ Zolotow, Sam (September 23, 1946). "'Swan Song' Ends Run on Saturday; Psychological Drama by Hecht and MacArthur Will Close After 155 Performances". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  201. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 1946). "The Playboy of the Western World – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Playboy of the Western World (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  202. ^ Calta, Louis (December 10, 1946). "News of the Stage; 'Playboy of the Western World' to End Broadway Run Jan. 4 After 81 Performances, Said to Be Record for the Comedy Another Wilde Revival Rehearsals of "S'Wonderful"". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  203. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  204. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 4, 1947). "John Loves Mary – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "John Loves Mary (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  205. ^ Calta, Louis (February 4, 1947). "John Loves Mary' to Arrive Tonight; Norman Krasna Comedy Will Open at the Booth Theatre -- Nina Foch in Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  206. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 28, 1948). "The Play's the Thing – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Play's the Thing (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  207. ^ Zolotow, Sam (April 28, 1948). "' Play's the Thing' at Booth Tonight; Revival of Hit Last Seen Here 22 Years Ago Has Louis Calhern Heading Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  208. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 8, 1949). "At War With the Army – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "At War with the Army (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  209. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 9, 1949). "At the Theatre; Yale Drama Student 'At War With the Army' in a Farce Put On at the Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  210. ^ Funke, Lewis (December 26, 1949). "The Velvet Glove' Will Open Tonight; Comedy Arriving at the Booth Marks Return of Walter Hampden, Grace George". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  211. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 26, 1950). "TWO ACTORS; Shirley Booth and Sidney Blackmer Play 'Come Back, Little Sheba'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  212. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 15, 1950). "Come Back, Little Sheba – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Come Back, Little Sheba (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1950)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  213. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 38.
  214. ^ Zolotow, Sam (February 15, 1950). "'Little Sheba' Set to Open at Booth; Theatre Guild's 4th Offering of Season Bows Tonight-- Booth, Blackmer Featured Rat Race" to Close Coward London-Bound". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  215. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 3, 1952). "At the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  216. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 2, 1952). "An Evening With Beatrice Lillie – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "An Evening with Beatrice Lillie (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1952)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  217. ^ Shanley, J. P. (May 4, 1953). "Camino Real' Ends Its Run Saturday; Williams' Much-Debated Play on Boards Since March 19 -- Lillie Show Off May 30". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  218. ^ McCord, Bert (May 11, 1953). "'Caesar' Film's Premiere At Booth Theater June 3". New York Herald Tribune. p. 10. ProQuest 1322487589.
  219. ^ Crowther, Bosley (June 14, 1953). "'Julius Caesar'; Shakespeare's Play Done Boldly on the Screen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  220. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 39.
  221. ^ The Broadway League (April 7, 1954). "Anniversary Waltz – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
    "Anniversary Waltz (Broadway, Broadhurst Theatre, 1954)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  222. ^ The Broadway League (January 24, 1956). "Time Limit! – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
    "Time Limit! (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1956)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  223. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 8, 1957). "The Theatre: 'Visit to a Small Planet'; Vidal's Foolish Notion Is Staged at Booth The Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  224. ^ "'Visit to a Small Planet' May Be a Surprise Hit". New York Herald Tribune. February 9, 1957. p. 6. ProQuest 1337691681.
  225. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 7, 1957). "A Visit to a Small Planet – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
    "A Visit to a Small Planet (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1957)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  226. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 17, 1958). "The Theatre: 'Two for the Seesaw'; Fonda, Anne Bancroft in Play at Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  227. ^ "'2 for the Seesaw' Opens At the Booth Tonight". New York Herald Tribune. January 16, 1958. p. 12. ProQuest 1327138499.
  228. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 16, 1958). "Two for the Seesaw – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Two for the Seesaw (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  229. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 6, 1959). "Theatre: Chayefsky's 'The Tenth Man'; Story of Exorcism of Dybbuk at Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  230. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1959). "The Tenth Man – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Tenth Man (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  231. ^ Calta, Louis (January 31, 1961). "Anouilh Comedy Due Here Feb. 27; 'Rendezvous in Senlis' Will Open at Gramercy Arts -- 'Octoroon' Extended". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  232. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 93; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 40.
  233. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 18, 1961). "A Shot in the Dark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "A Shot in the Dark (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1961)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  234. ^ Taubman, Howard (October 19, 1961). "Theatre: Paris Comedy; 'A Shot in Dark' Opens With Julie Harris". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  235. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 93–94; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 20.
  236. ^ "Theater: Schisgal's 'Luv' Is Directed by Nichols; New Comedy Opens at the Booth Theater; EliWallach,AlanArkin, Anne Jackson in Cast". The New York Times. November 12, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  237. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 40.
  238. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1964). "Luv – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Luv (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  239. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 27, 1966). "At the Drop of Another Hat – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "At the Drop of Another Hat (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  240. ^ Kerr, Walter (December 28, 1966). "Theater: Put-Out Zanies; Flanders and Swann Drop Another Hat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  241. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 3, 1967). "The Birthday Party – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Birthday Party (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  242. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 4, 1967). "The Theater: Pinter's 'Birthday Party'; First Full-Length Play by Briton Is at Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  243. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 41.
  244. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 20.
  245. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 22, 1969). "Stage: Wit and Sentiment; ' Butterflies Are Free' Opens at the Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  246. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 41.
  247. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 21, 1969). "Butterflies Are Free – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Butterflies Are Free (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1969)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  248. ^ Barnes, Clive (September 15, 1972). "Stage: 'That Championship Season'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  249. ^ Martin, Gottfried (September 18, 1972). "Arts & Pleasures A Daily Critique By WWD: The Theatre: That Championship Season". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 125, no. 53. p. 9. ProQuest 1523633355.
  250. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 14, 1972). "That Championship Season – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "That Championship Season (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  251. ^ "'Championship' to Close". The New York Times. March 27, 1974. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  252. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 5, 1974). "Bad Habits – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Bad Habits (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1974)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  253. ^ Gussow, Mel (May 6, 1974). "Theater: Tonic Humor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  254. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 30, 1974). "Stage: 'All Over Town' Proves a Zany Surprise". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  255. ^ "Papp Plans Plays at Booth Theater". The New York Times. May 24, 1975. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  256. ^ Calta, Louis (October 21, 1975). "Papp Drops 5‐Play Series at Booth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  257. ^ Nelsen, Don (October 21, 1975). "Papp's Booth plans poof". Daily News. p. 47. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  258. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 95; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 41.
  259. ^ The Broadway League (October 20, 1975). "The Leaf People – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
    "The Leaf People (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  260. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 21, 1975). "Very Good Eddie – Broadway Musical – 1975 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Very Good Eddie (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  261. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 22, 1975). "Theater: An Enchanting Old Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  262. ^ Gussow, Mel (September 16, 1976). "Stage: 'Colored Girls' Evolves". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  263. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 42.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 15, 1976). "for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1976)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  265. ^ "'For Colored Girls' Closes Tomorrow". The New York Times. July 15, 1978. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  266. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94.
  267. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 94.
  268. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 19, 1979). "The Elephant Man – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Elephant Man (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1979)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  269. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 95; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 42.
  270. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 12, 1981). "Mass Appeal – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Mass Appeal (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  271. ^ Rich, Frank (November 13, 1981). "Theater: 'Mass Appeal' Comes to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  272. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 13, 1982). "Good – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Good (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  273. ^ Rich, Frank (October 14, 1982). "Theater: 'Good,' on Becoming a Nazi". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  274. ^ "'Total Abandon' Closes". The New York Times. April 30, 1983. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  275. ^ The Broadway League (April 28, 1983). "Total Abandon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
    "Total Abandon (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  276. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 2, 1984). "Sunday in the Park with George – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Sunday in the Park with George (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1984)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  277. ^ Rich, Frank (May 3, 1984). "Stage: 'Sunday in the Park With George'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  278. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 95.
  279. ^ Berry, Warren; Kubasik, Ben (November 20, 1985). "Inside New York". Newsday. p. 6. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  280. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 19, 1985). "I'm Not Rappaport – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "I'm Not Rappaport (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1985)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  281. ^ "'Shirley Valentine' to Close". The New York Times. November 15, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  282. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 16, 1989). "Shirley Valentine – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Shirley Valentine (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  283. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  284. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  285. ^ "Legitimate: Landmarks Panel Names 5 Theaters". Variety. Vol. 329, no. 3. November 11, 1987. p. 93. ProQuest 1286133538.
  286. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 5, 1987). "5 More Broadway Theaters Classified as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 14, 2019. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  287. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  288. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  289. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  290. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). "High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  291. ^ Stuart, Jan (October 19, 1990). "'Island': Innocence and Simplicity". Newsday (Suffolk Edition). p. 177. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  292. ^ Smith, Roberta (October 14, 1990). "Theater; Behind the Painted World of 'Once On This Island'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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  294. ^ "'Island' to Close Dec. 1". The New York Times. November 8, 1991. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  295. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 13, 1992). "The Most Happy Fella – Broadway Musical – 1992 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Most Happy Fella (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  296. ^ "'Most Happy Fella' to Close". The New York Times. August 20, 1992. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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    "Someone Who'll Watch Over Me (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  298. ^ "'Watch Over Me' to Close". The New York Times. June 8, 1993. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  299. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 22, 1993). "Review/Theater; Family Genetics With a Background of Wagner". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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    "The Twilight of the Golds (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1993)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  301. ^ Richards, David (April 25, 1994). "Review/Theater: Broken Glass; A Paralysis Points to Spiritual and Social Ills". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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    "Broken Glass (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  303. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 15, 1994). "A Tuna Christmas – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "A Tuna Christmas (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  304. ^ Richards, David (December 16, 1994). "Theater Review; Christmas in a Quirky Texas Town Where 1+1=22". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  305. ^ le Sourd, Jacques (April 7, 1995). "'Having Our Say' Delany Sisters on Broadway". The Daily Item. p. 27. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  306. ^ Canby, Vincent (April 7, 1995). "Theater Review: Having Our Say; A Visit With Two Indomitable Sisters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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    "Having Our Say (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  308. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 97–98.
  309. ^ Van Gelder (March 25, 1996). "Theater Review; Mason Hoists Favorite Victims For His Verbal Target Practice". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  310. ^ le Sourd, Jacques (March 25, 1996). "A new Jackie Mason returns with a winner". The Journal News. p. 15. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  311. ^ "'Caveman' Is Closing". The New York Times. June 13, 1997. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  312. ^ Mandell, Jonathan (April 2, 1997). "Enter the New Caveman". Newsday. pp. 74, 78. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
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    "The Old Neighborhood (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  314. ^ "'Neighborhood' to Close". The New York Times. May 5, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  315. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 28, 1998). "An Evening with Jerry Herman – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "An Evening with Jerry Herman (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  316. ^ "Herman Revue to Close". The New York Times. August 18, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  317. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1998). "I'm Still Here...Damn It! – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "I'm Still Here...Damn It! (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  318. ^ Marks, Peter (November 6, 1998). "Theater Review; Comedy Whose Barbs Just Won't Go Away". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  319. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 18, 1999). "Via Dolorosa – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Via Dolorosa (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1999)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  320. ^ Brantley, Ben (March 19, 1999). "Theater Review; Outsider in a Passionate Land". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  321. ^ leSourd, Jacques (October 18, 1999). "For Dame Edna, a debut on Broadway is anything but a drag". The Journal News. pp. 31, 34. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  322. ^ Decaro, Frank (October 3, 1999). "THEATER; Dame Edna Speaks Her Mind, And Yours". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  323. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 2000). "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe – Broadway Play – 2000 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2000)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  324. ^ Weber, Bruce (November 17, 2000). "Theater Review; Yep, Still Struggling To Make Art of Soup". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  325. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 17, 2002). "Bea Arthur on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Bea Arthur on Broadway (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  326. ^ Brantley, Ben (February 18, 2002). "Theater Review; Bea Arthur's Ceremony Lacking All Innocence". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  327. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 25, 2002). "I'm Not Rappaport – Broadway Play – 2002 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "I'm Not Rappaport (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  328. ^ a b "'Rappaport' to Close". The New York Times. September 5, 2002. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  329. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 4, 2002). "Our Town – Broadway Play – 2002 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Our Town (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  330. ^ Brantley, Ben (December 5, 2002). "Theater Review; Life. Death. Life. Death. Yep, Grovers Corners". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  331. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 23, 2003). "The Retreat From Moscow – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Retreat from Moscow (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2003)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  332. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (October 24, 2003). "Theater Review; Here Lies The Ruin Of a Love". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  333. ^ a b "At This Theatre: Booth Theatre". Playbill. October 17, 1917. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  334. ^ McKinley, Jesse (December 9, 2004). "Arts, Briefly; Broadway Bloodletting". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  335. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 19, 2009). "The Story of My Life – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Dividing the Estate (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2008)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  336. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (January 10, 2009). "'Dividing the Estate' to Survive in Hartford". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  337. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 15, 2009). "Next To Normal – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Story of My Life (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  338. ^ a b McElroy, Steven (February 23, 2009). "Short 'Story of My Life'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  339. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 15, 2009). "Next To Normal – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
    "Next to Normal (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  340. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (November 10, 2010). "'Next to Normal' to Close on Jan. 16". ArtsBeat. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  341. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 19, 2011). "High – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "High (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  342. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (April 20, 2011). "'High,' With Kathleen Turner, Will Close on Sunday". ArtsBeat. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  343. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 3, 2011). "Other Desert Cities – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Other Desert Cities (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  344. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 4, 2011). "Painful Family Secrets Laid Bare". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  345. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 7, 2015). "Hand to God – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Hand to God (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  346. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (September 9, 2015). "'Hand to God' Sets Broadway Closing Date". ArtsBeat. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  347. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 21, 2019). "Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  348. ^ a b Green, Jesse (April 22, 2019). "Review: Taylor Mac's 'Gary' Finds Hope and Humor on a Pile of Corpses". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  349. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 2, 2019). "Freestyle Love Supreme – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Freestyle Love Supreme (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  350. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (October 3, 2019). "'Freestyle Love Supreme' Review: Hip-Hop Saves the World". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  351. ^ Moniuszko, Sara M (June 29, 2020). "Broadway suspends performances through 2020 amid coronavirus, extends ticket refunds to 2021". USA Today. Archived from the original on July 5, 2020. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  352. ^ "'Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf' Cancels Broadway Run". Deadline. March 21, 2020. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  353. ^ a b c The Broadway League (March 11, 2020). "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – Broadway Play – Opened Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2020)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  354. ^ Harms, Talaura (October 7, 2021). "Hip-Hop Improv Show Freestyle Love Supreme Returns to Broadway October 7". Playbill. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  355. ^ "Mic Drop! See the Cast of Freestyle Love Supreme Return to Broadway". Broadway.com. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  356. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 2021). "Freestyle Love Supreme – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Freestyle Love Supreme (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2021)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  357. ^ a b The Broadway League (2022). "for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf – Broadway Play – 2022 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow Is enuf (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  358. ^ a b Collins-Hughes, Laura (April 21, 2022). "Review: 'For Colored Girls' Returns, Leading With Joy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 22, 2022.
  359. ^ Geier, Thom (May 6, 2013). "Broadway box office: Despite Tony snub, Bette Midler sees a big boost in ticket sales". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  360. ^ Hetrick, Adam; Purcell, Carey (November 17, 2014). "The Elephant Man, With Bradley Cooper, Breaks Box-Office Record". Playbill. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  361. ^ "Production Gross". Playbill. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  362. ^ The Broadway League (November 29, 1915). "Our American Cousin – Broadway Play – 1915 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Our American Cousin (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1915)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  363. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  364. ^ The Broadway League (January 6, 1916). "David Garrick – Broadway Play – 1916 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "David Garrick (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1916)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  365. ^ The Broadway League (April 10, 1916). "The Co-respondent – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Co-respondent (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1916)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  366. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  367. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1918). "The Better 'Ole, – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  368. ^ The Broadway League (December 2, 1924). "Paolo and Francesca – Broadway Play – 1924 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Paolo and Francesca (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  369. ^ The Broadway League (August 31, 1925). "The Fall of Eve – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Fall of Eve (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  370. ^ The Broadway League (January 29, 1926). "John Gabriel Borkman – Broadway Play – 1926 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "John Gabriel Borkman (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1926)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  371. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  372. ^ The Broadway League (September 22, 1930). "Uncle Vanya – Broadway Play – 1930 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Uncle Vanya (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  373. ^ The Broadway League (November 1, 1930). "The Man in Possession – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Man in Possession (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  374. ^ The Broadway League (September 22, 1931). "The Breadwinner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Breadwinner (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  375. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  376. ^ The Broadway League (November 3, 1931). "After All – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "After All (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  377. ^ The Broadway League (November 13, 1931). "If Love Were All – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "If Love Were All (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  378. ^ The Broadway League (January 13, 1932). "Jewel Robbery – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Jewel Robbery (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  379. ^ The Broadway League (April 12, 1933). "For Services Rendered – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "For Services Rendered (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  380. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  381. ^ The Broadway League (May 15, 1933). "Candide – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Candide (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  382. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  383. ^ The Broadway League (February 8, 1940). "Two For The Show – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Two for the Show (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  384. ^ The Broadway League (January 20, 1941). "The Cream in the Well – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Cream in the Well (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  385. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  386. ^ The Broadway League (March 20, 1946). "He Who Gets Slapped – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "He Who Gets Slapped (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  387. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  388. ^ The Broadway League (April 2, 1947). "Tenting Tonight – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Tenting Tonight (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  389. ^ The Broadway League (May 14, 1947). "Portrait in Black – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Portrait in Black (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  390. ^ The Broadway League (October 7, 1947). "Duet for Two Hands – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Duet for Two Hands (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  391. ^ The Broadway League (October 21, 1947). "An Inspector Calls – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "An Inspector Calls (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  392. ^ The Broadway League (January 18, 1949). "The Shop at Sly Corner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Shop at Sly Corner (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  393. ^ The Broadway League (February 8, 1949). "King Richard III – Broadway Play – 1949 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Richard III (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  394. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 38.
  395. ^ The Broadway League (September 4, 1951). "Lace on Her Petticoat – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Lace on Her Petticoat (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  396. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 1953). "Late Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Late Love (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  397. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 39.
  398. ^ The Broadway League (October 29, 1952). "Dial "M" for Murder – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  399. ^ The Broadway League (September 23, 1954). "All Summer Long – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  400. ^ The Broadway League (December 5, 1955). "The Matchmaker – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "The Matchmaker (Broadway, Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 1955)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  401. ^ The Broadway League (April 17, 1963). "Rattle of a Simple Man – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Rattle of a Simple Man (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  402. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 40.
  403. ^ The Broadway League (September 29, 1963). "Spoon River Anthology – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Spoon River Anthology (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  404. ^ The Broadway League (January 31, 1968). "Avanti! – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Avanti! (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  405. ^ The Broadway League (May 2, 1968). "Leonard Sillman's New Faces of 1968 – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Leonard Sillman's New Faces of 1968 (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  406. ^ The Broadway League (October 16, 1974). "Brief Lives – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Brief Lives (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1974)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  407. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 42.
  408. ^ The Broadway League (January 2, 1979). "Monteith & Rand – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Monteith & Rand (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1979)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  409. ^ The Broadway League (September 20, 1981). "An Evening With Dave Allen – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "An Evening with Dave Allen (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  410. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1983). "American Buffalo – Broadway Play – 1983 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "American Buffalo (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  411. ^ The Broadway League (February 28, 1988). "A Walk in the Woods – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "A Walk in the Woods (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1988)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  412. ^ The Broadway League (October 5, 1988). "Michael Feinstein in Concert: "Isn't It Romantic" – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Michael Feinstein in Concert: "Isn't It Romantic" (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1988)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  413. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 35; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 97.
  414. ^ The Broadway League (December 14, 1989). "Tru – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
    "Tru (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  415. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 97.
  416. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 36.
  417. ^ The Broadway League (April 10, 2005). "The Pillowman – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Pillowman (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  418. ^ McGrath, Charles (April 26, 2005). "'The Pillowman' Audience: Shocked and a Bit Amused". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  419. ^ The Broadway League (November 21, 2005). "Seascape – Broadway Play – 2005 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Seascape (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  420. ^ Brantley, Ben (November 22, 2005). "Twilight by the Sea With Talking Lizards". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  421. ^ The Broadway League (May 4, 2006). "Faith Healer – Broadway Play – 2006 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Faith Healer (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  422. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 5, 2006). "Ralph Fiennes, Portraying the Gaunt Genius in 'Faith Healer'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  423. ^ The Broadway League (October 25, 2006). "Butley – Broadway Play – 2006 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Butley (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  424. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 26, 2006). "Zingers Shoot Forth From Inside a Toxic Fog". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  425. ^ The Broadway League (March 29, 2007). "The Year of Magical Thinking – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Year of Magical Thinking (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2007)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  426. ^ Brantley, Ben (March 30, 2007). "The Sound of One Heart Breaking". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  427. ^ The Broadway League (December 6, 2007). "The Seafarer – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Thurgood (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2008)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  428. ^ Brantley, Ben (December 7, 2007). "A Devil of a Christmas". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  429. ^ The Broadway League (April 30, 2008). "Thurgood – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  430. ^ Isherwood, Charles (May 1, 2008). "Trials and Triumphs on the Road to Justice". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  431. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 2012). "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – Broadway Play – 2012 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  432. ^ The Broadway League (April 24, 2013). "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  433. ^ The Broadway League (September 26, 2013). "The Glass Menagerie – Broadway Play – 2013 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Glass Menagerie (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  434. ^ The Broadway League (December 7, 2014). "The Elephant Man – Broadway Play – 2014 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Elephant Man (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2014)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  435. ^ The Broadway League (February 25, 2016). "Hughie – Broadway Play – 2016 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Hughie (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  436. ^ The Broadway League (June 6, 2016). "An Act of God – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "An Act of God (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  437. ^ The Broadway League (October 30, 2016). "Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Broadway Play – 2016 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  438. ^ The Broadway League (March 2, 2017). "Significant Other – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Significant Other (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2017)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  439. ^ The Broadway League (November 29, 2017). "Meteor Shower – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "Meteor Shower (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2017)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  440. ^ The Broadway League (May 31, 2018). "The Boys in the Band – Broadway Play – 2018 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
    "The Boys in the Band (Broadway, Booth Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Retrieved January 23, 2022.

Sources