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Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, Michael Spinks and Marvis Frazier

Boxing in the 1980s was filled with important fights, events and personalities that shaped the sport.[1] Boxing in the 1980s was shaped by many different situations, such as the continuous corporate battles between the different world sanctioning organizations, the void left by Muhammad Ali as the sport's ambassador and consequent search for a new boxing hero, the continuous presence of Don King as the sport's most famous promoter, the surge of rival promoters as Bob Arum, Butch Lewis and Murad Muhammad, and major rule changes. In 1986, Mike Tyson emerged as a fresh new face in the heavyweight division, which had seen a decline in champion quality level (particularly in the WBA side) after Ali's retirement and, later on, after longtime WBC ruler Larry Holmes' prime. In addition, the IBF and WBO began operating.

Another important aspect of boxing in the 1980s was the rivalry between five world champions: Wilfred Benítez, Roberto Durán, Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns and Sugar Ray Leonard.[citation needed] Of all the possible match-ups between these five, Benitez-Hagler was the only one that never happened. The circle of fights between these five gladiators actually began on November 30, 1979, when Leonard beat Benitez by knockout in round fifteen to win the WBC world Welterweight title, on the same night Hagler drew (tied) with Vito Antuofermo in his first bid to become the world's middleweight champion.

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References

  1. ^ "HBO Boxing: The 1980s – – Boxing News – Ring News24". Ring News 24. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  2. ^ Steven Pye. "Remembering Alan Minter v Marvin Hagler: one of boxing's lowest moments". the Guardian. Retrieved March 28, 2016.