Boyne City, Michigan
City of Boyne City
Looking east along Water Street in the Boyne City Central Historic District
Looking east along Water Street in the Boyne City Central Historic District
Motto: 
"Where Life Meets Lake"
Location within Charlevoix County
Location within Charlevoix County
Boyne City is located in Michigan
Boyne City
Boyne City
Location within the state of Michigan
Boyne City is located in the United States
Boyne City
Boyne City
Location within the United States
Coordinates: 45°12′44″N 85°00′50″W / 45.21222°N 85.01389°W / 45.21222; -85.01389Coordinates: 45°12′44″N 85°00′50″W / 45.21222°N 85.01389°W / 45.21222; -85.01389
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyCharlevoix
Settled1856
Incorporated1885 (village)
1907 (city)
Government
 • TypeCity commission
 • MayorHugh Conklin
 • ManagerMichael Cain
 • ClerkJessica Puroll
Area
 • Total5.34 sq mi (13.82 km2)
 • Land3.98 sq mi (10.32 km2)
 • Water1.35 sq mi (3.50 km2)
Elevation594 ft (181 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total3,816
 • Density957.59/sq mi (369.77/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code(s)
49712
Area code231
FIPS code26-09820[5]
GNIS feature ID0621826[4]
WebsiteOfficial website
City hall and municipal building
City hall and municipal building
U.S. Post Office in Boyne City
U.S. Post Office in Boyne City

Boyne City (/bɔɪn/) is a city in Charlevoix County in the U.S. state of Michigan.[4] The population was 3,816 at the 2020 census. The city is located at the southeastern end of Lake Charlevoix where Boyne River drains into the lake.

History

The area was first settled as early as 1856 by the families of John Dixon and John Miller in 1856, which was part of Emmet County until Charlevoix County was organized in 1869. Miller first named the settlement Boyne, as it was near the already-named Boyne River, which derived its name from a river in Ireland. A post office named Boyne opened on September 29, 1869 with Miller serving as the first postmaster. Others moved to the area with the opening of the Pine Lake House by A. J. Hall in 1879. The community incorporated as a village in 1885 and was renamed Boyne City in 1904. It incorporated as a city in 1907.[6]

Boyne City was home to the Buelah Home, which was built by Herman Swift in 1902. It served a housing facility for delinquent boys. By 1910, the Buelah Home housed approximately 200 boys, who were also reviled by the community for committing numerous crimes and causing mischief. Soon after, Swift was accused of molesting numerous boys under his care, and criminal charges were filed. It became a cause célèbre in northern Michigan, and it made headlines throughout the country. Many boys who accused Swift of the charges dropped out of the lawsuit to avoid public scrutiny. The case dragged on for three years before eventually making its way to the Michigan Supreme Court under chief justice Joseph H. Steere. Swift was acquitted, but it led to the Buelah Home being closed in 1912 and demolished in 1920.[7][8]

The city contains three listings on the National Register of Historic Places. The downtown area along Lake Street and Water Street has been included into the Boyne City Central Historic District. The municipal Boyne City Water Works Building was constructed in 1910 when the city was experiencing a tremendous growth in population, and the building continues to serve its purpose as a city water system booster station. The Chicago and West Michigan Railroad Charlevoix Station was built in 1892 as a station along the Chicago and Michigan Lake Shore Railroad, and it now serves as a museum and rental hall.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.34 square miles (13.83 km2), of which 3.98 square miles (10.31 km2) is land and 1.35 square miles (3.50 km2) is water.[3]

The principal geographic feature of the city is Lake Charlevoix. The Boyne River also flows through this city into Lake Charlevoix. Young State Park is just northwest of the city limits in Evangeline Township.

Climate

This climatic region has large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Boyne City has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps.[9]

Climate data for Boyne Falls, Michigan
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 52
(11)
55
(13)
67
(19)
84
(29)
90
(32)
97
(36)
100
(38)
102
(39)
98
(37)
85
(29)
75
(24)
64
(18)
102
(39)
Average high °F (°C) 28
(−2)
31
(−1)
37
(3)
54
(12)
68
(20)
77
(25)
81
(27)
80
(27)
70
(21)
61
(16)
43
(6)
32
(0)
55
(13)
Daily mean °F (°C) 20
(−7)
21
(−6)
26
(−3)
42
(6)
53
(12)
63
(17)
67
(19)
66
(19)
58
(14)
49
(9)
35
(2)
25
(−4)
44
(7)
Average low °F (°C) 12
(−11)
11
(−12)
16
(−9)
30
(−1)
39
(4)
49
(9)
53
(12)
52
(11)
46
(8)
38
(3)
27
(−3)
18
(−8)
33
(1)
Record low °F (°C) −24
(−31)
−29
(−34)
−19
(−28)
−3
(−19)
16
(−9)
25
(−4)
34
(1)
31
(−1)
22
(−6)
16
(−9)
−10
(−23)
−21
(−29)
−29
(−34)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.0
(51)
1.8
(46)
1.7
(43)
2.7
(69)
2.6
(66)
4.4
(110)
3.2
(81)
3.0
(76)
3.7
(94)
3.0
(76)
2.9
(74)
2.4
(61)
33.3
(850)
Source: [10]

Transportation

Major highways

Airport

Railroad

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890450
1900912102.7%
19105,218472.1%
19204,284−17.9%
19302,650−38.1%
19402,9049.6%
19503,0284.3%
19602,797−7.6%
19702,9696.1%
19803,34812.8%
19903,4783.9%
20003,5030.7%
20103,7356.6%
20203,8162.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census

As of the 2010 census,[13] there were 3,735 people, 1,635 households, and 1,011 families living in the city. The population density was 920.0 inhabitants per square mile (355.2/km2). There were 2,292 housing units at an average density of 564.5 per square mile (218.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.9% White, 0.4% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 3.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 1,635 households, of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.8% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.2% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.85.

The median age in the city was 41.9 years. 23.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.6% were from 25 to 44; 29% were from 45 to 64; and 16.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 census

As of the 2000 census,[5] there were 3,503 people, 1,468 households, and 932 families living in the city. The population density was 896.7 inhabitants per square mile (346.2/km2). There were 1,935 housing units at an average density of 495.3 per square mile (191.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.92% White, 0.11% African American, 1.14% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.74% of the population.

There were 1,468 households, out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.4% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females aged 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,819, and the median income for a family was $44,096. Males had a median income of $29,558 versus $22,583 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,030. About 8.9% of families and 11.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those aged 65 or over.

Culture

Road signage along M-75
Road signage along M-75

Events

Sports

Education

Boyne City is served entirely by its own school district, Boyne City Public Schools, which serves the city and large portions of several neighboring townships.[15]

Notable residents

References

  1. ^ City of Boyne City (2020). "Boyne City: City Commission". Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  2. ^ City of Boyne City (2020). "Boyne City: Departments". Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 21, 2022.
  4. ^ a b c U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Boyne City, Michigan
  5. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ Romig, Walter (October 1, 1986) [1973]. Michigan Place Names: The History of the Founding and the Naming of More Than Five Thousand Past and Present Michigan Communities. Great Lakes Books Series (Paperback). Detroit, Michigan: Wayne State University Press. p. 73. ISBN 978-0-8143-1838-6.
  7. ^ "The Lost Boys: Author probes dark days of child abuse in Boyne City". The Northern Express. 5 May 2013. Retrieved August 4, 2022.
  8. ^ "Author of 'Lost Boys' to speak at Carnegie April 22". Petoskey News-Review. 12 April 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Boyne City, Michigan
  10. ^ "Average Weather for Boyne City, MI: Temperature and Precipitation". Weatherbase. Retrieved July 28, 2022.
  11. ^ Michiganrailroads.com (2022). "Station: Boyne City, MI". Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  14. ^ "National Morel Mushroom Festival".
  15. ^ Michigan Geographic Framework (15 November 2013). "Charlevoix County School Districts" (PDF). Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  16. ^ United States Congress. "Charles Archibald Nichols (id: N000090)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  17. ^ Fox, Margalit (2004-10-15). "John Tebbel, 91, Writer and Historian of Publishing, Dies". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-06-23.