Bradley McGee
Personal information
Full nameBradley John McGee
Born (1976-02-24) 24 February 1976 (age 45)
Sydney
Height1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Weight72 kg (159 lb)
Team information
Current teamRetired
DisciplineRoad and track
RoleDirecteur sportif
Rider typeTime trialist
Professional teams
1999–2007Française des Jeux
2008Team CSC
Managerial team
2009–2012Saxo Bank–SunGard
Major wins
Grand Tours
Tour de France
2 individual stages (2002, 2003)
Giro d'Italia
1 individual stage (2004)

Bradley John McGee OAM (born 24 February 1976 in Sydney, New South Wales) is an Australian former professional racing cyclist. He is currently the head coach of the New South Wales Institute of Sport (NSWIS).[1] He started cycling in 1986 at the age of ten. He lives in Sydney and in Nice, France.

Career

His greatest success as a road cyclist has been winning the 2003 prologue of the Tour de France, and leading the race for three days in 2003. In 2004 he wore the leader's pink jersey of the Giro d'Italia for one day. In 2005 he wore the leader's golden jersey for four days in the Vuelta a España. He was the first Australian to lead the Tour of Spain, and the first to wear the leader's jersey of all three Grand Tours.

Brad McGee riding for Française des Jeux during the Stage 20 individual time trial of the 2005 Tour de France.
Brad McGee riding for Française des Jeux during the Stage 20 individual time trial of the 2005 Tour de France.

As a track cyclist and Australian Institute of Sport scholarship holder he met success in individual and team events. He won a gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens as a member of the team pursuit (with Graeme Brown, Brett Lancaster, and Luke Roberts) in world record time of 3:58.233. He won a silver medal for the Olympic 4000m pursuit. At the 2000 Summer Olympics in his home town of Sydney, he set an Australian record of 4 minutes, and won a bronze medal for the pursuit. In Atlanta at the 1996 Summer Olympics he won two bronze medals, for the individual pursuit and the team pursuit.

At the 1994 Commonwealth Games he won gold medals in the individual and team pursuit. At the 1998 Commonwealth Games he defended his Commonwealth titles to win gold in both events. At the 2002 Commonwealth Games he won the individual pursuit.

He was awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) in the 2005 Australia Day Honours List. Other awards include:

Bradley McGee is today a member of the 'Champions for Peace' club, a group of 54 famous elite athletes committed to serving peace in the world through sport, created by Peace and Sport, a Monaco-based international organisation.[3]

Major results

Track

1993
1st
Individual pursuit, UCI Junior Track World Championships
National Junior Track Championships
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Teams pursuit
1994
Commonwealth Games
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
UCI Junior Track World Championships
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
National Junior Track Championships
1st
Elimination race
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Scratch race
1st
Team pursuit
1995
1st
Team pursuit, UCI Track World Championships
National Track Championships
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
1996
Olympic Games
3rd
Individual pursuit
3rd
Team pursuit
1997
National Track Championships
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
1st
Individual pursuit – Quartu Sant'Elena, UCI Track World Cup Classics
1998
Commonwealth Games
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
1999
Oceania International Grand Prix
1st
Individual pursuit
1st
Team pursuit
2000
3rd
Individual pursuit, Olympic Games
2002
1st
Individual pursuit, UCI Track World Championships
1st
Individual pursuit, Commonwealth Games
2004
Olympic Games
1st
Team pursuit
2nd
Individual pursuit
1st
Individual pursuit – Manchester, UCI Track World Cup Classics
2007
3rd
Individual pursuit – Manchester, UCI Track World Cup Classics
2008
1st
Team pursuit – Los Angeles, UCI Track World Cup Classics
3rd
Team pursuit, UCI Track World Championships

Road

1993
1st
Time trial, National Junior Road Championships
1996
1st Stage 2 Tour of Cologne
1998
9th Chrono des Nations
1999
Tour de l'Avenir
1st Stages 3 (ITT) & 10
1st Prologue Tour de Normandie
8th Overall Tour de Wallonie
2000
1st Stage 5 Herald Sun Tour
2001
1st Stage 4 Grand Prix du Midi Libre
1st Stage 2b (ITT) Route du Sud
4th Overall Circuit de la Sarthe
7th Paris–Camembert
10th Grand Prix Eddy Merckx (with Jacky Durand)
2002
1st Stage 7 Tour de France
Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré
1st
Points classification
1st Prologue
2nd Overall Circuit de la Sarthe
2nd Overall GP Erik Breukink
10th Overall Critérium International
10th Tour de Vendée
2003
Tour de France
1st Prologue
Held
after Stages 1–3
1st Stage 8 (ITT) Tour de Suisse
2nd Overall Ronde van Nederland
1st Stage 6
3rd Overall Tour de Picardie
5th Grand Prix Eddy Merckx (with Baden Cooke)
6th Grand Prix du Morbihan
8th Overall Circuit de la Sarthe
8th Grand Prix de Rennes
2004
1st
Overall Route du Sud
1st Stage 3 (ITT)
8th Overall Giro d'Italia
1st Prologue
Held
after Stages 1 & 3–4
8th Grand Prix des Nations
9th Overall Tour de Romandie
1st Prologue
2005
1st Grand Prix de Villers-Cotterêts
8th Overall Tour de Suisse
1st
Points classification
1st Stage 3
Vuelta a España
Held
after Stages 1–4
2006
8th Overall La Méditerranéenne

Grand Tour general classification results timeline

Grand Tour 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Pink jersey Giro d'Italia 127 8 DNF
Yellow jersey Tour de France 83 109 133 105
Gold jersey Vuelta a España DNF DNF
Legend
Did not compete
DNF Did not finish


References

  1. ^ "Porte secures white jersey and likely top-eight finish". 29 May 2010.
  2. ^ "Cycling champion Brad McGee pedals into Hall of Fame". Sport Australia Hall of Fame website. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  3. ^ Peace and Sport