Buckberg mountain is a hill above the Hudson River that played a role in American Revolutionary War strategy concerning the Hudson Highlands.

History

The mountain slopes rise directly from the riverbank to an elevation of about 793 feet (242 m) above Tomkins Cove, a section of Stony Point, New York, in Rockland County. It is flanked on the north and south by Camp Addisone Boyce of the Girl Scouts of the USA and Camp Bullowa of the Boy Scouts of America. In recent years its forests have been largely subdivided and developed for upscale housing.[1] Buckberg lies about two miles (3 km) south and slightly west of Dunderberg Mountain.

Buckberg is the site of Washington's Lookout, an observation point used by General George Washington and Colonel “Mad” Anthony Wayne to plan a surprise attack on British troops in the Battle of Stony Point. The post overlooked Haverstraw Bay and afforded views of the Hudson River to the north and south.[2][3] "Washington-Wayne Lookout Park" is a 5.2-acre (21,000 m2) historic site on the slopes of Buckberg purchased in February 2000 by a consortium led by the Open Space Institute, with funds provided by the "Lila Acheson and DeWitt Wallace Fund for the Hudson Highlands." [4][5][6]

A few reliable sources are said to place Buckberg outside the Hudson Highlands.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Weinstock, Cheryl Platzman (2001-08-12). "If You're Thinking of Living In/Tomkins Cove; A Bucolic Hamlet in Growing Demand". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-03-10.
  2. ^ [1] "Archived copy" (PDF). The Hudson Valley Magazine. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-03-27. Retrieved 2009-02-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Revolutionary War Battles 1775-1783". www.myrevolutionarywar.com. Retrieved 2020-03-10.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-10-21. Retrieved 2009-02-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ l, We have picked; About, Scapes That We Care. "Where and How We Protect Land for Recreation". Open Space Institute. Retrieved 2020-03-10.
  6. ^ Gibson, Wendy (2002-12-06). "State Parks Announce Historic Preservation Awards". New York State Office of Parks. Archived from the original on 2006-09-24. Retrieved 2020-03-09.