Buffalo County
Alma Area Museum in Old Buffalo County Training School and Teachers College Building in Alma, Wisconsin.
Alma Area Museum in Old Buffalo County Training School and Teachers College Building in Alma, Wisconsin.
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Buffalo County
Location within the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°23′N 91°45′W / 44.38°N 91.75°W / 44.38; -91.75
Country United States
State Wisconsin
Founded1854
Named forBuffalo River
SeatAlma
Largest cityMondovi
Area
 • Total710 sq mi (1,800 km2)
 • Land672 sq mi (1,740 km2)
 • Water38 sq mi (100 km2)  5.3%
Population
 • Total13,317
 • Density19.7/sq mi (7.6/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.buffalocounty.com

Buffalo County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2020 census, the population was 13,317.[1] Its county seat is Alma.[2] The county was created in 1853 and organized the following year.[3][4]

History

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Buffalo County, founded in 1853, is named for the Buffalo River, which flows from Strum to Alma, where it empties into the Mississippi River. The Buffalo River obtained its name from the French voyager Father Louis Hennepin, who named it Riviere des Boeufs in 1680. The first permanent settlement was established in 1839, located in what is now Fountain City. This settlement was originally named Holmes' Landing after a family who traded with the Sioux and Chippewa. Buffalo County was settled primarily by Swiss, German, and Norwegian immigrants who were drawn to the area by the growing lumber industry, fertile soils, access to the Mississippi, and available land. By 1848, a second community was established called Twelve Mile Bluff, which is now known as Alma.

Soils of Buffalo County
Soils of Buffalo County

Agriculture developed during the 1850s on top of the ridges where natural prairies and oak savannas occurred, which made working the land much easier. With the lack of good roads, settlement remained along the Mississippi River, where farmers could ship their grain on steamboats. The development of the Northern Rail from Winona, Minnesota, allowed for development away from the river, and by 1890, farmers were transporting their goods predominantly by rail.

The Civil War gave a boost to the local economy with the rising demand for wheat, which was the main crop of the county. The postwar period brought a large influx of settlers; however, because of declining soil fertility, many moved west rather than adopt crop rotation and fertilization.[citation needed] With the price of wheat falling, farmers turned to dairy farming, and by the 1880s, local creameries had started to appear.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 710 square miles (1,800 km2), of which 672 square miles (1,740 km2) are land and 38 square miles (98 km2) (5.3%) are covered by water.[5]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Railroads

Buses

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18603,864
187011,123187.9%
188015,52839.6%
189015,9973.0%
190016,7654.8%
191016,006−4.5%
192015,615−2.4%
193015,330−1.8%
194016,0905.0%
195014,719−8.5%
196014,202−3.5%
197013,743−3.2%
198014,3094.1%
199013,584−5.1%
200013,8041.6%
201013,587−1.6%
202013,317−2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010[10] 2020[1]

2020 census

As of the census of 2020,[1] the population was 13,317. The population density was 19.7 inhabitants per square mile (7.6/km2). There were 6,506 housing units at an average density of 9.6 per square mile (3.7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 95.0% White, 0.3% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Ethnically, the population was 2.5% Hispanic or Latino of any race.

2000 census

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Buffalo County
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Buffalo County

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 13,804 people, 5,511 households, and 3,780 families residing in the county. The population density was 20 people per square mile (8/km2). There were 6,098 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.69% White, 0.12% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. 0.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 44.3% were of German, 22.1% Norwegian and 8.8% Polish ancestry. 96.9% spoke English, 1.6% Spanish and 1.1% German as their first language.

There were 5,511 households, out of which 30.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 6.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.40% were non-families. 27.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.10% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 100.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.40 males.

In 2017, there were 121 births, giving a general fertility rate of 58.4 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the 22nd lowest rate out of all 72 Wisconsin counties. 33 of the births were to unmarried mothers, 88 to married mothers.[12] Additionally, there were fewer than five reported induced abortions performed on women of Buffalo County residence in 2017.[13]

Communities

Cities

Villages

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Ghost towns/neighborhoods

Politics

United States presidential election results for Buffalo County, Wisconsin[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 4,834 61.85% 2,860 36.59% 122 1.56%
2016 4,048 57.99% 2,525 36.17% 408 5.84%
2012 3,364 47.79% 3,570 50.72% 105 1.49%
2008 2,923 41.76% 3,949 56.41% 128 1.83%
2004 3,502 46.13% 3,998 52.67% 91 1.20%
2000 3,038 45.75% 3,237 48.74% 366 5.51%
1996 1,800 32.39% 2,681 48.25% 1,076 19.36%
1992 2,029 29.19% 2,996 43.11% 1,925 27.70%
1988 2,783 44.08% 3,481 55.14% 49 0.78%
1984 3,325 52.74% 2,921 46.34% 58 0.92%
1980 3,569 48.11% 3,276 44.16% 573 7.72%
1976 2,844 44.25% 3,448 53.65% 135 2.10%
1972 3,079 54.40% 2,461 43.48% 120 2.12%
1968 2,992 54.21% 2,112 38.27% 415 7.52%
1964 2,091 36.31% 3,663 63.60% 5 0.09%
1960 3,464 55.37% 2,790 44.60% 2 0.03%
1956 3,387 59.83% 2,266 40.03% 8 0.14%
1952 4,233 67.92% 1,988 31.90% 11 0.18%
1948 2,350 47.07% 2,563 51.33% 80 1.60%
1944 3,416 63.19% 1,948 36.03% 42 0.78%
1940 4,056 60.76% 2,516 37.69% 103 1.54%
1936 2,481 40.05% 3,434 55.44% 279 4.50%
1932 1,711 34.03% 3,252 64.68% 65 1.29%
1928 3,027 61.88% 1,836 37.53% 29 0.59%
1924 1,324 33.05% 176 4.39% 2,506 62.56%
1920 3,082 85.40% 299 8.28% 228 6.32%
1916 1,492 56.54% 1,043 39.52% 104 3.94%
1912 1,239 48.65% 848 33.29% 460 18.06%
1908 1,937 63.72% 1,027 33.78% 76 2.50%
1904 2,147 68.35% 911 29.00% 83 2.64%
1900 2,091 62.40% 1,205 35.96% 55 1.64%
1896 2,301 61.89% 1,302 35.02% 115 3.09%
1892 1,523 49.46% 1,393 45.24% 163 5.29%


Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "2020 Decennial Census: Buffalo County, Wisconsin". data.census.gov. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 11, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 20, 2007. Retrieved November 12, 2007.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Archived from the original on April 14, 2017. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  10. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved January 17, 2014.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ "Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables". Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved June 20, 2019.
  13. ^ Reported Induced Abortions in Wisconsin, Office of Health Informatics, Division of Public Health, Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Section: Trend Information, 2013-2017, Table 18, pages 17-18
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 9, 2020.
  15. ^ Mulligan, William H., Jr.; Cooke, Chauncey Herbert (2007). A Badger Boy in Blue: The Civil War Letters of Chauncey H. Cooke. Detroit, Michigan: Wayne State University Press. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-8143-3343-3. Retrieved March 29, 2016.

Further reading

Coordinates: 44°23′N 91°45′W / 44.38°N 91.75°W / 44.38; -91.75