Cadet Grey
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#91A3B0
sRGBB (r, g, b)(145, 163, 176)
HSV (h, s, v)(205°, 18%, 69%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(66, 16, 231°)
SourceISCC-NBS
ISCC–NBS descriptorGrayish blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Cadet grey (sometimes spelled cadet gray in parts of the United States) is a somewhat blue-greyish shade of the color grey. The first recorded use of cadet grey as a color name in English was in 1912.[1] [inconsistent] Before 1912, the word cadet grey was used as a name for a type of military issue uniform.

Variations

Space cadet

Space Cadet
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#1E2952
sRGBB (r, g, b)(30, 41, 82)
HSV (h, s, v)(227°, 63%, 32%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(18, 29, 260°)
SourceResene
ISCC–NBS descriptorDark blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color space cadet.

Space cadet is one of the colors on the Resene Color List, a color list widely popular in Australia and New Zealand. The color "space cadet" was formulated in 2007.

Cadet blue

Cadet Blue
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#5F9EA0
sRGBB (r, g, b)(95, 158, 160)
HSV (h, s, v)(182°, 41%, 63%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(61, 30, 195°)
SourceX11
ISCC–NBS descriptorLight bluish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the grayish blue web color cadet blue.

The first recorded use of cadet blue as a color name in English was in 1892.[2]

In 1987, cadet blue was formulated as one of the X11 colors, which in the early 1990s became known as the X11 web colors.

Cadet

Cadet
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#536872
sRGBB (r, g, b)(83, 104, 114)
HSV (h, s, v)(199°, 27%, 45%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(43, 15, 224°)
Source[Unsourced]
ISCC–NBS descriptorGrayish blue
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color cadet, a dark shade of cadet grey.

The first recorded use of cadet as a color name in English was in 1915.[3]

Military use

Uniform of a Confederate artillery corporal

The name cadet grey stems from its use in uniforms of the United States Army, in particular, cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

Both armies in the American Civil War initially included uniforms in the color, including the 7th New York Militia,[4] but it was primarily identified with those of the Confederate States of America. By 1863, all troops were asked to obey the Regulations for the Confederate States Army and have cadet grey uniforms.[5] The lack of a formal uniform at the beginning of the war, with some Confederates wearing blue and some U.S.-allied state militias still wearing gray, caused significant confusion for both sides in the First Battle of Manassas.

Cadet grey was previously chosen for the Army of the Republic of Texas in 1835 and 1840.[6][7]

Under the name "pike grey" (Hechtgrau) this color distinguished the jäger regiments of the Austrian (and subsequently Austro-Hungarian) armies from 1801 until 1915.[8] In 1908 it was adopted as the universal color of the new field service uniform for the army as a whole.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 191; Color Sample of Cadet Grey: Page 95 Plate 36 Color Sample C4
  2. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 191; Color Sample of Cadet Blue: Page 93 Plate 35 Color Sample A9
  3. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 191; Color Sample of Cadet: Page 115 Plate 46 Color Sample A6
  4. ^ Marvel, William (2007). Mr. Lincoln Goes to War. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 978-0-618-87241-1.
  5. ^ Miller, David (2001). Uniforms, Weapons, and Equipment of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books. pp. 118–120. ISBN 1-84065-257-8.
  6. ^ Robinson, James W. (2004). The Laws of Texas 1822–1897. Texas: The Lawbook Exchange. p. 997. ISBN 1-58477-416-9.
  7. ^ Reid, Stuart; Hook, Richard (2003). The Texan Army 1835-46. Osprey Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 1-84176-593-7.
  8. ^ Haythornthwaite, Philip (1986). Austrian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (1): Infantry. London: Osprey. pp. 35–36. ISBN 0-85045-689-4.
  9. ^ Jung, Peter (2003). The Austro-Hungarian Forces in World War I (1). London: Osprey. p. 16. ISBN 1-84176-594-5.