California College of the Arts
Former name
School of the California Guild of Arts and Crafts (1907–1908),
California School of Arts and Crafts (1908–1935),
California College of Arts and Crafts (1936–2002)
TypePrivate art school
Established1907; 117 years ago (1907)
Endowment$36.0 million (2019)[1]
PresidentDavid C. Howse
Academic staff
500
Students1,390
Undergraduates1,063
Postgraduates327
Location, ,
United States
CampusUrban
4 acres (1.6 ha)
ColorsNew teal, paper white, black    
Websitecca.edu

The California College of the Arts (CCA) is a private[2] art school in San Francisco, California. It was founded in Berkeley, California in 1907 and moved to a historic estate in Oakland, California in 1922. In 1996, it opened a second campus in San Francisco; in 2022, the Oakland campus was closed and merged into the San Francisco campus. CCA enrolls[when?] approximately 1,239 undergraduates and 380 graduate students.[3]

History

Treadwell Mansion (Oakland, CA)
The CCA campus in San Francisco's design district (in the foreground below)

CCA was founded in 1907 by Frederick Meyer in Berkeley as the School of the California Guild of Arts and Crafts during the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. The Arts and Crafts movement originated in Europe during the late 19th century as a response to the industrial aesthetics of the machine age. Followers of the movement advocated an integrated approach to art, design, and craft.[4] The initial campus was in the "Studio Building" at 2045 Shattuck Avenue, and they had forty three enrolled students.[5]

In 1908 the school was renamed California School of Arts and Crafts. In 1910, the school moved to the site of the former Berkeley High School building at 2119 Allston Way (at Grove Street, now Martin Luther King Way).[5]

The college's Oakland campus location was acquired in 1922, when Meyer bought the four-acre James Treadwell estate at Broadway and College Avenue. Two of its buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.[6] After the San Francisco campus was opened, the Oakland campus continued to house the more traditional, craft based studios like the art glass, jewelry metal arts, printmaking, painting, sculpture and ceramic programs.

In 1936, it became the California College of Arts and Crafts (CCAC).[7][8] In 1940 a Master of Fine Arts program was established.[9]

In the 1980s, the college began renting various locations in San Francisco, and in 1996 it opened a campus in the city's Design District, converting a former Greyhound maintenance building.[10]

21st century and modern history

In 2003, the college changed its name to California College of the Arts, under the leadership of president Michael S. Roth.[7][11]

In 2016, it was decided to close the Oakland campus and consolidate all activities at the San Francisco campus. The final day of classes at Oakland was May 6, 2022. The college said it will "redevelop the campus with community gathering spaces, affordable housing, office space for arts nonprofits and bike parking while preserving the campus’s cluster of historic buildings and trees."[12]

Clifton Hall, one of the dormitories at the Oakland campus, was bought by the city of Oakland to use for public housing.[13] Other parts of the Oakland campus remained unused in 2024, with plans to create a mixed-use development with hundreds of residential units.[14]

List of presidents

  1. Frederick Meyer (1907–1944)[8][15]
  2. Spencer Macky (1944–1954)[16]
  3. Daniel S. Defenbacher (1954–1957)[17][18]
  4. Joseph A. Danysh (acting; 1957–1959)[18][19][20]
  5. Henry X. Ford (1960–c. 1985)[21][22]
  6. Neil Hoffman (1985–1994)[23][24]
  7. Lorne Michael Buchman (1994–1999)[11][25][26]
  8. Michael S. Roth (2000–2007)[27]
  9. Stephen Beal (2008–2023)[28]
  10. David C. Howse (2023–present)[28]

Academics

Montgomery Building, San Francisco campus

CCA offers 22 undergraduate and 10 graduate majors.[29] In 2021, CCA unveiled a BFA in Comics.[30] CCA confers the bachelor of fine arts (BFA), bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of architecture (BArch), master of fine arts (MFA), master of arts (MA), master of architecture (MArch), master of advanced architectural design (MAAD), masters of design (MDes)[29] and master of business administration (MBA) degrees.

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, located near the San Francisco campus in a facility on Kansas St., is a forum for contemporary culture. In 2013 the Wattis Institute recruited a new director, Anthony Huberman, formerly of Artist's Space in New York.[31]

In the U.S. News & World Report rankings for 2020, CCA ranked #10 in the country for graduate fine arts programs,[32] #4 in graphic design,[33] and #6 in ceramics.[34] PayScale lists[when?] CCA as the #1 art school in the United States for return on investment and #4 for average alumni salary (bachelor's degree).[35][36] As of 2022, Niche rated CCA with an overall grade of B− (with B− for academics, A+ for diversity, and B− for value), reporting an acceptance rate of 85%, graduation rate of 67%, and average alumni starting salary of $29,400.[2] The average class size is 13 for undergraduate programs and 12 for graduate.[37] The student to faculty ratio is 8:1.[37]

Accreditation

CCA is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD), and the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

Notable people

Main article: List of California College of the Arts people

References

  1. ^ As of June 30, 2019. "U.S. and Canadian 2019 NTSE Participating Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2019 Endowment Market Value, and Percentage Change in Market Value from FY18 to FY19 (Revised)". National Association of College and University Business Officers and TIAA. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Explore California College of the Arts". Niche. Retrieved March 27, 2022.
  3. ^ "California College of the Arts (CCA) Overview". US News. Archived from the original on April 17, 2016. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  4. ^ Edwards, Robert W. (2012). Jennie V. Cannon: The Untold History of the Carmel and Berkeley Art Colonies, Vol. 1. Oakland, Calif.: East Bay Heritage Project. pp. 79–86, 102, 688. ISBN 9781467545679. An online facsimile of the entire text of Vol. 1 is posted on the Traditional Fine Arts Organization website ("Jennie V. Cannon: The Untold History of the Carmel and Berkeley Art Colonies, vol. One, East Bay Heritage Project, Oakland, 2012; by Robert W. Edwards". Archived from the original on April 29, 2016. Retrieved June 7, 2016.)
  5. ^ a b "Glance by California College of the Arts". issuu.com. October 10, 2007. pp. 8–9. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Issuu.
  6. ^ "Treadwell Mansion & Carriage House". Oakland Wiki. Retrieved May 13, 2022.
  7. ^ a b "College Milestones". California College of the Arts. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "California School of Arts and Crafts becomes California College of Arts and Crafts". Oakland Tribune. April 19, 1936. p. 18. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Catalogue for 1942-1942 California College of Arts and Crafts. Oakland, California: California College of Arts and Crafts. 1942. p. 7.
  10. ^ Le, Anh-Minh (July 5, 2013). "CCA a seat of Calif. furniture design". SFGATE. Retrieved March 27, 2022.
  11. ^ a b Bonetti, David (March 31, 2000). "CCAC names Roth its 8th president". SFGATE. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  12. ^ Cabanatuan, Michael (May 6, 2022). "California College of the Arts bids farewell to Oakland". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  13. ^ King, John. "How a stylish Oakland dorm has become much-needed homeless housing". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved February 23, 2024.
  14. ^ Orenstein, Natalie (February 7, 2024). "Hundreds of homes could replace California College of the Arts campus in Rockridge". The Oaklandside. Retrieved February 23, 2024.
  15. ^ "Founder's Day at California College of Arts and Crafts". Media Burn Archive (video). 1972. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  16. ^ CCAC the Art College in the Community. the Press of the California College of Arts and Crafts. pp. 16–17. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  17. ^ "Oakland, Berkeley to Honor New CCAC Head at Banquet". Oakland Tribune. October 17, 1954. p. 75. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b "College Art News". College Art Journal. 17 (1): 76–84. September 1, 1957. doi:10.1080/15436322.1957.10795857. ISSN 1543-6322. Daniel S. Defenbacher has resigned as President of the California College of Arts and Crafts. Joseph A. Danysh has been named Acting President
  19. ^ Hughes, Edan Milton (1986). Artists in California, 1786-1940. Hughes Publishing Company. p. 361. ISBN 978-0-9616112-0-0 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ "Joseph Danysh Returns to Bay, Scene of Early Triumphs". Oakland Tribune. August 4, 1957. p. 104. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Ford Named Arts, Crafts College Head". Oakland Tribune. March 31, 1960. p. 36. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "H.X. Ford Gets Presidency of Arts College". Oakland Tribune. August 9, 1959. p. 25. Retrieved March 27, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "MIAD goes to L.A. for its new president". OnMilwaukee. March 28, 2007. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  24. ^ "Hoffman Quits As Head Of Art Institute School". Chicago Tribune. April 2, 1985. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  25. ^ Baker, Kenneth (March 18, 2000). "CCAC Appoints New President". SFGATE. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  26. ^ "Lorne Buchman Named President Of Pasadena Art Center College Of Design". Artforum. July 9, 2009. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  27. ^ "California College Of The Arts Names Stephen Beal President". Artforum. May 15, 2008. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  28. ^ a b Bravo, Tony (October 25, 2023). "California College of the Arts announces new president". Datebook, The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 27, 2024.
  29. ^ a b "Two new graduate programs, starting fall 2015". Art & Education. Archived from the original on May 13, 2016. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  30. ^ "Comics". CCA. Retrieved September 10, 2021.
  31. ^ Bliss, Chris. "Anthony Huberman Appointed Director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts". cca.edu. Archived from the original on October 15, 2018. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  32. ^ "Best Art Schools - Best Fine Arts Programs". U.S. News & World Report.
  33. ^ "Best Art Schools - Best Graphic Design Programs". U.S. News & World Report.
  34. ^ "Best Art Schools - Best Ceramics Programs". U.S. News & World Report.
  35. ^ "Best Value Art Colleges". Payscale.
  36. ^ "Best Art Colleges". Payscale.
  37. ^ a b "Facts & Figures". CCA. Retrieved March 31, 2022.


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