Cachupa, the national dish of Cape Verde
Cachupa, the national dish of Cape Verde
Location of Cape Verde
Location of Cape Verde
Chamuças
Chamuças
Grilled chicken with tomatoes, popular on the island of Fogo
Grilled chicken with tomatoes, popular on the island of Fogo
Grogue, the Capeverdean grog
Grogue, the Capeverdean grog
Couscous with molasses and goat cheese
Couscous with molasses and goat cheese

The cuisine of Cape Verde is a West African cuisine largely influenced by Portuguese, Southern and Western European and West African cuisine. Cape Verde was a colony of Portugal from its colonization until 1975.[1]

Because the archipelago is inside the Atlantic Ocean, fish is very important in Cape Verdean cooking.

Overview

One of the most important aspects of Cape Verdean culture is the beverage grogue, a strong rum made from distilled sugar cane on the islands of Santo Antao and Santiago. The beverage is made in towns such as Paul on Santo Antao and Cidade Velha on Santiago using a trapiche. A variation of the drink is ponche (punch) which is sweetened with condensed milk or sugarcane molasses. Due to the intoxication on consuming grogue, it is consumed by many Cape Verdean musicians seeking inspiration.[2]

Corn and beans are staples of Cape Verdean cuisine.[3] Also popular are rice, fried potatoes, cassava and vegetables such as carrots, kale, squash, fish and meat such as tuna, sawfish, lobster, chicken, grilled pork and eggs. One legacy of the Portuguese on the islands is olives and Alentejo wines which are still imported.[4]

Cachupa, a stew, is considered the national dish of Cape Verde which includes mashed maize, onions, green bananas, manioc, sweet potatoes, squash and yams. Manioc balls are one of the most common in Cape Verde.[5]

Seafood dishes include bafa and búzio cabra, made from bubonian conch (Persististrombus latus).

In December 2002, the Cape Verdean government prohibited the killing of turtles by law, per their participation in the Convention on Biological Diversity in 1995 e a Convenção sobre Comercio Internacional de Espécies de Fauna e Flora Selvagem Ameaçadas de Extinção (CITES).[6] The dish once popular on Santiago Island named turtle steak has slowly disappeared.

Strela is Cape Verde's most popular beer who started production in 2006, it superseded Portuguese beers including Super Bock and Sagres (in 2009).[7]

Meals

Beverages

Desserts

See also

References

  1. ^ King, Russell (2001). The Mediterranean Passage: Migration and New Cultural Encounters in Southern Europe. Liverpool University Press. p. 104. ISBN 0-85323-646-1.
  2. ^ Flood, Callie (July 2010). Cape Verde (Other Places Travel Guide). Other Places Publishing. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-9822619-2-7.
  3. ^ a b Raymond Almeida. "Cachupa di Cabo Verde". UMassD. Archived from the original on 2006-12-05. Retrieved 2017-01-17.
  4. ^ Ham, Anthony (2009). West Africa. Lonely Planet. p. 233. ISBN 978-1-74104-821-6.
  5. ^ Maria Augusta Carvalho (2013). Comeres de África Falados em Português. Casa das Letras. p. 129. ISBN 978-972-46-2188-3
  6. ^ "Cabo Verde: Tartarugas marinhas ameaçadas de extinção em menos de dez anos - RTP Notícias". ww1.rtp.pt. Archived from the original on 2012-02-29. Retrieved 2008-07-07.
  7. ^ "Cabo Verde: Cerveja Strela ultrapassou Sagres e quer passar Superbock" [Strela drink Surpassed Sagres and to Surpass Superbock]. SAPO CV (in Portuguese). 27 November 2009. Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 10 November 2016.
  8. ^ "Grogue Official". Grogue Official. Retrieved 13 October 2016.

Further reading