This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Spanish. (August 2020) Click [show] for important translation instructions. View a machine-translated version of the Spanish article. Machine translation like DeepL or Google Translate is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English Wikipedia. Consider adding a topic to this template: there are already 4,953 articles in the main category, and specifying|topic= will aid in categorization. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary accompanying your translation by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation. A model attribution edit summary is Content in this edit is translated from the existing Spanish Wikipedia article at [[:es:Carne de chango]]; see its history for attribution. You should also add the template ((Translated|es|Carne de chango)) to the talk page. For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.

Carne de chango (Spanish for "monkey meat")[1] is a lime-marinated, smoke-cured cut of pork loin principally seen in the Catemaco region of the state of Veracruz in Mexico.[2]

The switch from monkey meat to pork meat arose from the hunting to the edge of extinction of the two monkey species resident in the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas.

References

  1. ^ Raver, Anne (20 June 2002). "NATURE; With Dinner, a Fern Course". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 April 2011.
  2. ^ Carl Franz & Lorena Havens (2012). The People's Guide to Mexico. Avalon Publishing. p. 498. ISBN 9781612380490.((cite book)): CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)