Carroll County
Carroll County Courthouse in Carrollton
Carroll County Courthouse in Carrollton
Map of Kentucky highlighting Carroll County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°40′N 85°08′W / 38.67°N 85.13°W / 38.67; -85.13
Country United States
State Kentucky
Founded1838
Named forCharles Carroll of Carrollton
SeatCarrollton
Largest cityCarrollton
Area
 • Total137 sq mi (350 km2)
 • Land129 sq mi (330 km2)
 • Water8.7 sq mi (23 km2)  6.4%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total10,810 Decrease
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitewww.carrollcountygov.us

Carroll County is a county located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Carrollton.[1] The county was formed in 1838 and named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last living signer of the Declaration of Independence.[2] It is located at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 137 square miles (350 km2), of which 129 square miles (330 km2) is land and 8.7 square miles (23 km2) (6.4%) is water.[3] It is the third-smallest county by area in Kentucky.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18403,966
18505,52639.3%
18606,57819.0%
18706,189−5.9%
18808,95344.7%
18909,2663.5%
19009,8256.0%
19108,110−17.5%
19208,3462.9%
19308,155−2.3%
19408,6576.2%
19508,517−1.6%
19607,978−6.3%
19708,5236.8%
19809,2708.8%
19909,2920.2%
200010,1559.3%
201010,8116.5%
202010,8100.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790-1960[5] 1900-1990[6]
1990-2000[7] 2010-2020[8]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 10,155 people, 3,940 households, and 2,722 families residing in the county. The population density was 78 per square mile (30/km2). There were 4,439 housing units at an average density of 34 per square mile (13/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 95.16% White, 1.94% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.42% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 3.25% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,940 households, out of which 33.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 11.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.30% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 29.90% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 12.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 101.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,925, and the median income for a family was $44,037. Males had a median income of $33,588 versus $20,974 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,057. About 10.40% of families and 14.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.80% of those under age 18 and 21.60% of those age 65 or over

Communities

Politics

Carroll County was strongly pro-Confederate during the Civil War: only 2.70 percent of its white population volunteered to serve in the Union Army, which constitutes the fourteenth-lowest of 109 counties extant as of the 1860 election, and was indeed lower than for the whole of seceded Tennessee.[10] Consequently, Carroll County remained overwhelmingly Democratic for the next century and a quarter, being the only Kentucky county outside the heavily unionized coalfields to vote for George McGovern in 1972. The first Republican to carry Carroll County was Ronald Reagan in 1984, and the growing social liberalism of the Democratic Party has meant the county has voted increasingly Republican since the turn of the century,[11] although Hillary Clinton's 28.69 percent – even if over fifteen percent worse than any previous Democrat – was still as good as she received in any rural white southern county.

United States presidential election results for Carroll County, Kentucky[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 2,954 71.42% 1,116 26.98% 66 1.60%
2016 2,588 67.13% 1,106 28.69% 161 4.18%
2012 1,999 54.32% 1,629 44.27% 52 1.41%
2008 2,032 52.99% 1,716 44.75% 87 2.27%
2004 2,175 55.81% 1,688 43.32% 34 0.87%
2000 1,818 51.96% 1,601 45.76% 80 2.29%
1996 1,170 36.14% 1,689 52.18% 378 11.68%
1992 1,046 27.92% 2,119 56.57% 581 15.51%
1988 1,702 46.81% 1,913 52.61% 21 0.58%
1984 1,824 53.65% 1,564 46.00% 12 0.35%
1980 1,076 32.33% 2,127 63.91% 125 3.76%
1976 815 26.30% 2,251 72.64% 33 1.06%
1972 1,228 47.71% 1,308 50.82% 38 1.48%
1968 868 27.54% 1,765 56.00% 519 16.47%
1964 491 15.81% 2,592 83.48% 22 0.71%
1960 1,135 33.78% 2,225 66.22% 0 0.00%
1956 1,130 34.08% 2,169 65.41% 17 0.51%
1952 1,019 28.06% 2,605 71.72% 8 0.22%
1948 639 18.66% 2,626 76.67% 160 4.67%
1944 755 22.02% 2,662 77.65% 11 0.32%
1940 804 21.55% 2,915 78.15% 11 0.29%
1936 794 22.39% 2,718 76.63% 35 0.99%
1932 761 20.05% 3,015 79.45% 19 0.50%
1928 1,649 46.91% 1,863 53.00% 3 0.09%
1924 1,306 36.59% 2,243 62.85% 20 0.56%
1920 906 21.88% 3,209 77.49% 26 0.63%
1916 535 23.15% 1,757 76.03% 19 0.82%
1912 317 15.09% 1,573 74.87% 211 10.04%


In gubernatorial elections, Carroll has remained solidly Democratic: no Republican gubernatorial candidate ever carried the county until 2019, when Carroll County voted for Matt Bevin.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 34.
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  8. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  10. ^ Copeland, James E.; ‘Where Were the Kentucky Unionists and Secessionists’; The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, volume 71, no. 4 (October, 1973), pp. 344-363
  11. ^ Cohn, Nate; ‘Demographic Shift: Southern Whites’ Loyalty to G.O.P. Nearing That of Blacks to Democrats’, The New York Times, April 24, 2014
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 30, 2018.


Coordinates: 38°40′N 85°08′W / 38.67°N 85.13°W / 38.67; -85.13