Carroll County
Carroll County Courthouse
Carroll County Courthouse
Map of Mississippi highlighting Carroll County
Location within the U.S. state of Mississippi
Map of the United States highlighting Mississippi
Mississippi's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°27′N 89°55′W / 33.45°N 89.92°W / 33.45; -89.92
Country United States
State Mississippi
Founded1833
Named forCharles Carroll of Carrollton
SeatCarrollton (Northern District)
Vaiden (Southern District)
Largest townVaiden
Area
 • Total635 sq mi (1,640 km2)
 • Land628 sq mi (1,630 km2)
 • Water6.3 sq mi (16 km2)  1.0%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total10,597
 • Estimate 
(2018)
9,911
 • Density17/sq mi (6.4/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitecarrollcountyms.org

Carroll County is a county in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,597.[1] Its county seats are Carrollton and Vaiden.[2] The county is named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton,[3] the last surviving signatory of the Declaration of Independence.

Carroll County is part of the Greenwood, Micropolitan Statistical Area. Bordered by the Yazoo River on the west and the Big Black River to the east, it is considered within the Mississippi Delta region. Most of its land is in the hill country.

The Porter Wagoner song "The Carroll County Accident" was set here. The county is referred to in the third verse of Bobbie Gentry's 1967 hit song, "Ode to Billie Joe".

History

This area was developed by European Americans for cotton plantations near the rivers. These were dependent on the labor of large gangs of enslaved African Americans. After the American Civil War, many freedmen worked as sharecroppers or tenant farmers on the plantations. Other areas were harvested for timber.

After the Civil War, whites used violence and intimidation to suppress voting and enforce white supremacy. In 1890 the state legislature disenfranchised most blacks, who were a majority in the state, by creating barriers to voter registration; it also passed Jim Crow laws, segregating public facilities and treating freedmen and their descendants as second-class citizens.

In the period from 1877 to 1950, Carroll County had 29 documented lynchings of African Americans, the second-highest number in the state. Nearby LeFlore County had a total of 48 lynchings in this period.[4]

Twenty-five of these killings were committed in little more than a one-month period in Carrollton, the county seat, in the late winter of 1886.[5] One local man was lynched in February, taken from jail where he was serving a sentence. Twenty-four deaths are associated with what has been known as the "Carrollton Courthouse Massacre", called a "riot" at the time and blamed on African Americans by the grand jury. But 60 armed, masked white men entered the courthouse, fatally shooting brothers Ed and Charley Brown, the black plaintiffs who had filed an assault case against a white man, and 18 other blacks, who died that day. Another three black men died of their wounds soon after. The father of the two Brown brothers was also fatally shot days later. No one was prosecuted for these killings.[5]

Geography

Carroll County consists of rolling hills, largely covered with trees.[6] The county's highest point is adjacent to State Highway 35, 8 miles (13 km) WSW of Winona, at 540' (165m) ASL.[7] According to the Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 635 square miles (1,640 km2), of which 628 square miles (1,630 km2) is land and 6.3 square miles (16 km2) (1.0%) is water.[8]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
184010,481
185018,49176.4%
186022,03519.2%
187021,047−4.5%
188017,795−15.5%
189018,7735.5%
190022,11617.8%
191023,1394.6%
192020,324−12.2%
193019,765−2.8%
194020,6514.5%
195015,499−24.9%
196011,177−27.9%
19709,397−15.9%
19809,7764.0%
19909,237−5.5%
200010,76916.6%
201010,597−1.6%
2018 (est.)9,911[9]−6.5%
US Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2013[1]
Swamp in Carroll County in winter
Swamp in Carroll County in winter

From 1940 to 1970, the county population declined markedly, as many African Americans left in the Great Migration to West Coast cities that had a growing defense industry. Others went North to Chicago and other industrial cities. Rural whites also moved to cities to find work.

2020 census

Carroll County racial composition[14]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 6,529 65.3%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 3,030 30.31%
Native American 15 0.15%
Asian 29 0.29%
Other/Mixed 241 2.41%
Hispanic or Latino 154 1.54%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 9,998 people, 3,827 households, and 2,685 families residing in the county.

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States Census,[15] there were 10,769 people, 4,071 households, and 3,069 families in the county. The population density was 17/sqmi (7/km2). There were 4,888 housing units at an average density of 8/sqmi (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 62.67% White, 36.61% Black or African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. 0.73% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,071 households, out of which 32.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.20% were married couples living together, 15.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.60% were non-families. 22.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.01.

The largest ancestry groups in Carroll County were English 51%, African 38.6%, and Scots-Irish 12.1%

The county population contained 24.50% under the age of 18, 9.60% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 25.70% from 45 to 64, and 13.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,878, and the median income for a family was $35,711. Males had a median income of $28,459 versus $19,695 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,744. About 13.70% of families and 16.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.30% of those under age 18 and 23.50% of those age 65 or over.


Education

Carroll County School District is the area public school district. It operates one high school, J. Z. George High School, and formerly operated Vaiden High School.

Carroll Academy is an area private school that is financially supported by the Council of Conservative Citizens, a white supremacist group.[16]

Pillow Academy in unincorporated Leflore County, near Greenwood, enrolls some students from Carroll County.[17] It originally was a segregation academy.[18]

Communities

Towns

Unincorporated places

Notable people

Politics

United States presidential election results for Carroll County, Mississippi[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,924 68.83% 1,729 30.33% 48 0.84%
2016 3,799 68.72% 1,680 30.39% 49 0.89%
2012 3,960 66.09% 2,007 33.49% 25 0.42%
2008 3,902 65.41% 2,037 34.15% 26 0.44%
2004 3,664 65.52% 1,900 33.98% 28 0.50%
2000 3,165 64.28% 1,726 35.05% 33 0.67%
1996 2,629 53.28% 2,041 41.37% 264 5.35%
1992 1,695 54.96% 1,182 38.33% 207 6.71%
1988 2,628 62.51% 1,560 37.11% 16 0.38%
1984 2,823 65.70% 1,462 34.02% 12 0.28%
1980 2,153 50.92% 2,037 48.18% 38 0.90%
1976 1,561 49.29% 1,566 49.45% 40 1.26%
1972 1,777 73.31% 580 23.93% 67 2.76%
1968 138 4.32% 925 28.96% 2,131 66.72%
1964 2,043 95.42% 98 4.58% 0 0.00%
1960 207 14.06% 425 28.87% 840 57.07%
1956 234 15.09% 1,080 69.63% 237 15.28%
1952 535 31.42% 1,168 68.58% 0 0.00%
1948 14 1.14% 74 6.04% 1,138 92.82%
1944 68 4.52% 1,438 95.48% 0 0.00%
1940 38 2.63% 1,408 97.37% 0 0.00%
1936 19 1.81% 1,030 98.10% 1 0.10%
1932 9 0.75% 1,189 99.17% 1 0.08%
1928 49 4.26% 1,102 95.74% 0 0.00%
1924 70 7.25% 895 92.75% 0 0.00%
1920 184 21.30% 669 77.43% 11 1.27%
1916 34 3.42% 943 94.96% 16 1.61%
1912 16 2.09% 653 85.36% 96 12.55%


See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved September 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 70.
  4. ^ Lynching in America, 3rd ed. Archived 2017-10-23 at the Wayback Machine, Supplement by County, p. 6
  5. ^ a b Susie James, "Carrollton Courthouse 'Riot' of 1886", Commonwealth (Greenwood MS), 12 March 1996; special to the Clarion-Ledger (Jackson MS); accessed 31 March 2018
  6. ^ Carroll County MS (Google Maps, accessed 25 January 2020)
  7. ^ Carroll County High Point, Mississippi (PeakBagger.com - accessed 25 January 2020)
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved January 25, 2020.
  10. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 25, 2020.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 12, 2021.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  16. ^ Beirich, Heidi (October 28, 2010). "White Supremacist Group Backs Private Academies in Mississippi". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved December 3, 2014.
  17. ^ Profile of Pillow Academy 2010-2011 Archived 1 December 2001 at the Library of Congress Web Archives. Pillow Academy. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  18. ^ Lynch, Adam (November 18, 2009). "Ceara's Season". Jackson Free Press. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 4, 2018.

Coordinates: 33°27′N 89°55′W / 33.45°N 89.92°W / 33.45; -89.92