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Casey Sander
Born
Clinton O. Sander

(1956-07-06) July 6, 1956 (age 67)
OccupationActor
Years active1982–present
Children2

Clinton O. "Casey" Sander (born July 6, 1956) is an American actor known as the character "Captain" Jimmy Wennick on the short-lived TV series Tucker. His television credits also include Criminal Minds, The Golden Girls,[1] Grace Under Fire, Home Improvement,[1] Malcolm in the Middle, Rules of Engagement, Sons of Anarchy, Mad Men, Silicon Valley, The Newsroom, Buffy the Vampire Slayer,[2] Hunter, NCIS, NCIS: Los Angeles and Marvin Marvin, among other shows. He more recently had a recurring role on the TV sitcom The Big Bang Theory as Bernadette's father, Mike,[3] and also appeared in four episodes of The Ranch as Roger Hollister.

Early and personal life

Sander was born in Washington, D.C. His father was an Air Force lieutenant colonel.[4] While attending Nathan Hale High School in Seattle, Washington, as sophomore, he played shortstop on the school's baseball team.[2]

In his senior year, he was a 10th round draft pick for the California Angels and was accepted after he graduated from high school in 1973. Though he had turned down football scholarships from Washington and Washington State University, he had an unsuccessful season with the Angels and was eventually released. Sander and Richard Karn attended the same junior high school in Seattle and played against each other on their respective high schools’ football teams.[2]

After being released from the Angels and playing one season for the Seattle Rainiers, he accepted a football scholarship from University of Puget Sound. He considered becoming a sports broadcaster and took up an acting class in hopes it would help his performance. He participated in college plays including Waiting for Godot. After earning a teaching degree, he briefly taught at Curtis Senior High School in University Place, Washington. After quitting, he drove to Los Angeles and worked as a shipyard hand, log-cabin builder, bartender and car dealer to get by before getting an acting agent.[2]

His first significant work was in print advertising including being the "Winston man" for Winston Cigarettes.[5] Sander has a son, Max, and a daughter, Mimi.[2]

In 2020, Sander appeared as a guest on the Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip marathon fundraiser episode of The George Lucas Talk Show.

Selected filmography

References

  1. ^ a b "An Unusual Slant to the Right `Grace Under Fire' Character Wade Swoboda Is 'Archie Bunker with a Brain'". The News Tribune. Tacoma. 1993-10-27. Retrieved 2013-11-26.
  2. ^ a b c d e Raley, Dan (2005-05-24). "Where Are They Now: Casey Sander, ballplayer-turned-actor". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 2013-11-26.
  3. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (2012-04-12). "'The Big Bang Theory': 'Grace Under Fire' Neighbor to Play Bernadette's Dad". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2013-11-26.
  4. ^ "Casey Sander Biography". filmreference.com. Retrieved 2013-11-26.
  5. ^ Mendoza, N.F. (1994-12-20). "Actor's life mirrors his sitcom character". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2013-11-26.