Central Election Commission
CIK
Agency overview
Formed1993
HeadquartersMoscow
Employees15
Agency executive
WebsiteCIKRF.ru
Emblem of the Central Election Commission
Emblem of the Central Election Commission
Former logo of the Central Election Commission
Former logo of the Central Election Commission

The Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation (Russian: Центральная избирательная комиссия Российской Федерации (Центризбирком)) is the superior power body responsible for conducting federal elections and overseeing local elections in the Russian Federation founded in September 1993. It consists of 15 members. The President of Russia, State Duma and Federation Council of Russia each appoint five members. In turn, these members elect the Chairman, Deputy Chairman and Secretary. The Commission is in power for a four-year term.

On 30 January 2007, amendments to the Russian election legislation, which would allow people without higher education in law to become members of the Central Election Commission, were passed by the President of Russia.[1][2]

History

In 1917-1918 there was the All-Russian election commission for the Constituent Assembly, in the Far East in 1920-1922 - The Central Election Commission for the elections to the National Assembly, 1937-1989 - The Central Election Commission on elections to the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR, in the USSR in the same period - the Central Election Commission on elections to the Supreme Soviet of the USSR, in 1989–1993. Central Election Commission for the Election of the MPs of the RSFSR, in 1993-1995 - Central Election Commission for the Election of the Members for the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation.

The Central Election Commission on elections to the State Duma was established by a decree of the President of the Russian Federation Boris Yeltsin of 24 September 1993. The first composition of the commission - 20 people - was approved by the head of state on 29 September 1993. Ten of them been at the suggestion of regional parliaments, and the other ten represented the bodies of executive power of the subjects of the Russian Federation. A prerequisite was that applicants had a higher legal education or a degree in law (then, since 2007, a higher education degree was required).

After the parliamentary elections in December 1993, the institution was renamed into the Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation.

International Cooperation

The CEC of Russia is a member of the Association of Central and Eastern European Election Officials.[3]

Chairpersons

Name Term of office
Start End
Nikolay Ryabov September 1993 14 November 1996
Alexander Ivanchenko 14 November 1996 24 March 1999
Alexander Veshnyakov 24 March 1999 26 March 2007
Vladimir Churov 26 March 2007 27 March 2016
Ella Pamfilova 28 March 2016

Members

The composition of the Central Election Commission, as of February 2021.

Name Appointed by
Ella Pamfilova President
Alexander Kinyov
Vasily Likhachyov
Yevgeny Shevchenko
Boris Ebzeyev
Nikolai Levichev State Duma
Yevgeny Kolyushin
Sergey Sirotkin
Valery Kryukov
Valery Galchenko
Anton Lopatin Federation Council
Mayya Grishina
Siyabshakh Shapiyev
Alexander Klyukin
Nikolay Bulayev

Subordinate organizations

The following organizations are operating under Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation according to the corresponding presidential decrees of the President of Russia.[4]

Functions

Central Electoral Committee of the Russian Federation:

The Russian Center for Training in Electoral Technologies under the Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation

Logo of the RCTET at the CEC of Russia
Logo of the RCTET at the CEC of Russia

An institution subordinate to the Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation. The main goals of its activities are training of election organizers and other participants in the electoral process, as well as improving the level of legal culture of citizens.[6] Since 2015, the Center has a branch in the Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol.[7]

Since 2008, the Center for the Development of Information Technologies and Technology at the Central Executive Committee of the Russian Federation together with the scientific and technical center "Poisk-IT" has been developing and implementing a specialized software package for monitoring the media.[8] The goal was to ensure equal distribution of airtime among candidates and parties, to comply with the procedure for publishing election results and to timely suppress violations in this area.[9] According to experts, despite the futility of applying this system to the electoral process in foreign countries,[10] it remains extremely popular to ensure the legality of elections in Russia itself.[11]

In 2018, the format of conducting among students, graduate students and young teachers of the "Сontest for the best work on the issues of electoral law and the process" underwent significant changes, and the competition itself was called "Atmosphere". Since 2019, the rules for holding the Olympiad "Sophium" among students in grades 9-11 have changed.

Also in 2019, the official Youtube channel called “Simply about the Elections” was restarted, containing educational and enlightening materials on electoral topics.

At the end of 2019, the scientific journal "Citizen. Elections. Power" was included in the List of peer-reviewed scientific publications by decision of the Presidium of the Higher Attestation Commission.

One of the constant lines of educational work with youth is to conduct study tours of the building of the Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation.

The existing assessments of the results of the Center’s activities have changed significantly over time. If in mid-2017 experts agreed on the overall inefficiency of this state structure,[12] then by the end of 2019 independent observers directly linked the reduction in violations in election commissions of various levels with the actions of the RCTET at the Central Executive Committee of Russia.[13]

Gallery

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Nagornykh, Irina; Farizova, Suzanne; Khamraev, Victor (20 January 2007). "CEC is open to experienced non-lawyers". Kommersant (in Russian). Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Ikstens, Jānis and more (October 2001). "Party and Campaign Funding in Eastern Europe: A Study of 18 Member Countries of the ACEEEO". International Foundation for Electoral Systems. Cite journal requires |journal= (help) found at Google Scholar Archived 2004-07-14 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Organizations Affiliated to the CEC of Russia".
  5. ^ "67-ФЗ от 12 июня 2002 года "Об основных гарантиях избирательных прав и права на участие в референдуме граждан Российской Федерации"".
  6. ^ "The order of the President of the Russian Federation dated 01.11.1994, No. 558-rp". President of the Russian Federation (in Russian). Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Charter". RCTET at the CEC of Russia (in Russian). Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  8. ^ "The software package of the information-analytical system of the Russian Center for Training in Electoral Technologies at the CEC of Russia". Poisk-IT (in Russian). Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  9. ^ Frolenkova, Olga (September 2015). "Training of election officials and improving the legal culture of voters" (PDF). Elections in Europe. 11: 60–66.
  10. ^ "Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation stretched out on America". Commersant (in Russian). 20 October 2008. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  11. ^ "For the first time, an independent pool of election experts will be formed at the CEC". Izvestia (in Russian). 11 July 2016. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  12. ^ "CEC improves training system for selective technologies". Izvestia (in Russian). 3 July 2017. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  13. ^ Melkonyantz, Grigory (5 December 2019). "Speech to the CEC on values in the training process for election commissions". Golos (in Russian). Retrieved 12 February 2020.

Coordinates: 55°45′27″N 37°37′35″E / 55.75750°N 37.62639°E / 55.75750; 37.62639