Chaeremon of Alexandria (/kəˈrmən, -mɒn/; Greek: Χαιρήμων ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς, gen.: Ancient Greek: Χαιρήμονος; fl. 1st century AD) was a Stoic philosopher and historian.[1] His father – about whom nothing is known – was called Leonidas, and he was probably born no later than 10 AD.[1] He may have been the grandson of the Chaeremon who accompanied the Roman prefect Aelius Gallus on his tour of Egypt in 26 AD.[1] He was probably one of the ambassadors to Claudius from Alexandria in 40 AD.[2] According to the Suda, he was the head of the Alexandrian school of grammarians, and he may also have been head of the Museion.[2] He also taught Nero, probably before 49 AD when Seneca the Younger became Nero's tutor.[2]

All of Chaeremon's works are lost, though three titles are preserved: the History of Egypt, Hieroglyphika, and On Comets, along with a number of fragments quoted by later authors.[a][2] Aside from his three works whose titles are known, a fragment of a grammatical treatise by Chaeramon also survives.[2] Ancient sources describe him as a Stoic, and his surviving writings on Egyptian mythology are from a "typically Stoic" perspective.[2]

One of the poems from Martial's eleventh book of Epigrams mocks Chaeremon; as Martial did not usually attack living figures Chaeremon presumably died before 96 AD when Epigrams XI was published.[2]

Notes

  1. ^ Pieter van der Horst includes 14 certain and 14 doubtful fragments in his edition of Chaeramon's works.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Chaeremon". Oxford Dictionary of African Biography. ISBN 9780195382075.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g van der Horst, Pieter Willem (1987). Chaeremon: Egyptian Priest and Stoic Philosopher. Leiden: Brill. p. ix.
  3. ^ van der Horst, Pieter Willem (1987). Chaeremon: Egyptian Priest and Stoic Philosopher. Leiden: Brill. p. xi.