Statue of the Buddha wearing the Iranian three-pointed chamail, Ghorband valley, Fondukistan monastery, circa 700 CE.[1]
Statue of the Buddha wearing the Iranian three-pointed chamail, Ghorband valley, Fondukistan monastery, circa 700 CE.[1]
Buddha wearing a crown and cape. Painting in niche "I" at Bamiyan, 7th century CE.
Buddha wearing a crown and cape. Painting in niche "I" at Bamiyan, 7th century CE.

The chamail is a type of poncho-like clothing from Central Asia.[2]

As a result of Central-Asian influence, this type of clothing also appears in Indian works of art of the 1st millennium CE, as in Ajanta or Bagh.[2] The chamail was probably introduced in India by the Sakas or the Kushans.[2] The chamail also appears in Gandharan Buddhist sites such as Fondukistan and Bamiyan, and even as far as Xinjiang.[2] In Kashmir also, the chamail appears on the Buddha or Bodhisattavas during the 6-7th century CE.[2]

Examples

References

  1. ^ Compareti, Matteo (2009). "Iranian Elements in Kaśmīr and Tibet Sasanian and Sogdian Borrowings in Kashmiri and Tibetan Art". Transoxiana. 14.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Compareti, Matteo (2014). "Some Examples of Central Asian Decorative Elements in Ajanta and Bagh Indian Paintings". The Silk Road. 12: 40–41.
  3. ^ Brancaccio, Pia (2010). The Buddhist Caves at Aurangabad: Transformations in Art and Religion. BRILL. pp. 80–82, 305–307 with footnotes. ISBN 978-9004185258.
  4. ^ DK Eyewitness Travel Guide India. Dorling Kindersley Limited. 2017. p. 126. ISBN 9780241326244.

Sources