Charles Bradley
Personal information
Born (1959-05-16) May 16, 1959 (age 62)
Havre de Grace, Maryland
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Listed weight215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High schoolEdgewood (Edgewood, Maryland)
CollegeWyoming (1977–1981)
NBA draft1981 / Round: 1 / Pick: 23rd overall
Selected by the Boston Celtics
Playing career1981–1984
PositionShooting guard
Number35, 30
Career history
As player:
19811983Boston Celtics
1983Seattle SuperSonics
1983–1984Albuquerque Silvers
1984Wyoming Wildcatters
As coach:
1989–1994BYU (assistant)
1994–1997Metro State
1997–2000Loyola Marymount
Career highlights and awards
  • 3× First-team All-WAC (1979–1981)
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at NBA.com
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at Basketball-Reference.com

Charles Warnell Bradley (born May 16, 1959) is an American former basketball player and coach. He was selected by the Boston Celtics in the first round (23rd pick overall) of the 1981 NBA draft. Born in Havre de Grace, Maryland, Bradley was a 6'5" shooting guard from the University of Wyoming. He played in three National Basketball Association (NBA) seasons, from 1981 to 1984, with the Celtics and Seattle SuperSonics. In his NBA career, Bradley played in 110 games and scored a total of 347 points. He additionally played one season in the Continental Basketball Association (CBA). After being released by the SuperSonics, he split the majority of the 1983–84 season between the Albuquerque Silvers and Wyoming Wildcatters, averaging 12.9 points, 3.4 rebounds and 3.5 assists in 34 games.[1]

Following his playing career, Bradley became a college coach, first as an assistant at Brigham Young, then as head coach at Metro State and Loyola Marymount (LMU). He was head coach at LMU from 1997 to 2000, resigning after a 2–26 season.[2]

References

  1. ^ "1984–85 Continental Basketball Association Official Guide, page 223–4". Continental Basketball Association. Fall 1984. ((cite magazine)): Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  2. ^ "Report: Aggers new Loyola Marymount coach". UPI.com. March 31, 2000. Retrieved June 20, 2020.