Chippewa
Chippewa-Hiawatha
Overview
First serviceMay 28, 1937
Last serviceFebruary 2, 1960
Former operator(s)Milwaukee Road

The Chippewa consisting of mostly conventional components, and later known as the Chippewa-Hiawatha, with a streamlined consist was a passenger train operated by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad ("Milwaukee Road") between Chicago, Illinois and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. It operated from 1937 to 1960. The Chippewa-Hiawatha was one of several regional trains to carry the "Hiawatha" brand.

History

The Milwaukee Road introduced the Chippewa on May 28, 1937,[1][2] after an inspection tour of the new rolling stock for residents along the route.[3][4][5] The new train featured streamlined coach equipment and a 6-hour running time,[6] two hours faster than previous services. Its original northern terminus was Iron Mountain, Michigan, 291 miles (468 km) north of Chicago in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The trains operated daily, carrying number 21 northbound and 14 southbound. The northern terminus was extended twice: first to Channing on October 18, 1937[7] and then finally in March 1938 to Ontonagon, on the southern shore of Lake Superior.[8][9][10][11]

In the fall of 1948 the Milwaukee Road re-branded the train Chippewa-Hiawatha[12][13] and upgraded its equipment, including Beaver Tail parlor cars. Dieselization followed in 1950. After that the train was downgraded as the Milwaukee Road's passenger service contracted. Service north of Channing was deemed unprofitable[14][15][16] and ended on December 29, 1953. Parlor service ended north of Milwaukee in 1956. In April 1957 the train's name reverted to the Chippewa. Despite public support for the service,[17][18][19] the Milwaukee Road discontinued the train altogether on February 2, 1960.[20][21][22]

Equipment

An advertisement depicts a third-generation Beaver Tail car on the rear of the Midwest Hiawatha in the 1940s. The Chippewa received these cars in 1948.
An advertisement depicts a third-generation Beaver Tail car on the rear of the Midwest Hiawatha in the 1940s. The Chippewa received these cars in 1948.

Much of the Chippewa's equipment came second-hand from its more famous cousin. The original Chippewa operated with two coaches, a railway post office (RPO), dining car, and parlor car. As part of a reshuffling of equipment on the Milwaukee Road in late 1948 the Chippewa received the "Beaver Tail" parlors made famous by the original Hiawatha. Motive power was provided by Class A 4-4-2 steam locomotives between Chicago and Milwaukee, and by the Class F3 Pacifics north. Dieselization came in 1950 with Erie-builts from Fairbanks-Morse. Later diesels included EMD E7s, EMD FP7s, and finally EMD GP9s. The train received newer equipment in 1948, including third-generation Beaver Tail parlors. These cars were removed in 1951 along with the full dining car.[23]

Between 1950-1952 a Doodlebug replaced conventional equipment between Channing and Ontonagon.[24]

References

  1. ^ "'Chippewa' Makes First Run Today". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. May 28, 1937. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ "'Chippewa' Train Will Carry Mail". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. May 21, 1937. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ "'Chippewa' Train Coming Tomorrow". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. May 25, 1937. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ "'Chippewa' Is Here On Visit". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. May 26, 1937. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ "New Train Is Inspected By Many Citizens". The Sheboygan Press. Sheboygan, WI. May 28, 1937. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ "Chippewa Fastest Train In the U.P." The Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, MI. July 23, 1937. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  7. ^ "Change in Chippewa's Schedule Starts Today". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. October 18, 1937. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  8. ^ Scribbins 1970, pp. 188–194
  9. ^ Official Guide of the Railways 1950, p. 993
  10. ^ "Milwaukee To Run Chippewa Train As Far As Ontonagon". The Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, MI. February 11, 1938. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ "Chippewa Run Extended". Ironwood Daily Globe. Ironwood, MI. Escanaba Press. February 13, 1938. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ "Schedules the Same, Train's the Same, Chip's Got New Name". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. July 30, 1948. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  13. ^ The Milwaukee Road (August 17, 1948). "The miles fly by on the new Chippewa Hiawatha (advertisement)". Lansing State Journal. Lansing, MI. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  14. ^ "Service Cancellation Granted to Railroad". The Winona Republican-Herald. Winona, MN. November 28, 1953. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  15. ^ "Rail Service Ordered Abandoned By Court". Battle Creek Enquirer. Battle Creek, MI. Associated Press. December 2, 1953. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  16. ^ "PSC Must Relent In Railroad Case". The Holland Evening Sentinel. Holland, MI. UP. November 28, 1953. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  17. ^ "Channing Trains Backed By PSC". The Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, MI. Associated Press. January 30, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  18. ^ "Move To Save 'Chippewa' Train". The Post-Crescent. Appleton, WI. Associated Press. February 1, 1960. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  19. ^ "ICC Receives Four Protests On Chippewa Train Removal". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Green Bay, WI. February 24, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  20. ^ Scribbins 1970, p. 200
  21. ^ "Milwaukee Road Drops Channing Chippewa Train". The Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, MI. Associated Press. January 23, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  22. ^ "Milwaukee Road Moves Up Date To Curtail Service". The Escanaba Daily Press. Escanaba, MI. February 2, 1960. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  23. ^ Scribbins 2008, pp. 33–34
  24. ^ Scribbins 1970, p. 199