Clofedanol
Clofedanol.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesColdrin, Gentos, Pectolitan, Ulo, Ulone
AHFS/Drugs.comMicromedex Detailed Consumer Information
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Identifiers
  • 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-dimethylamino-
    1-phenyl-propan-1-ol
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.011.219 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC17H20ClNO
Molar mass289.80 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • Clc1ccccc1C(O)(c2ccccc2)CCN(C)C
  • InChI=1S/C17H20ClNO/c1-19(2)13-12-17(20,14-8-4-3-5-9-14)15-10-6-7-11-16(15)18/h3-11,20H,12-13H2,1-2H3 checkY
  • Key:WRCHFMBCVFFYEQ-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Clofedanol (INN) or chlophedianol (BAN) is a centrally acting cough suppressant used in the treatment of dry cough. Clofedanol has local anesthetic, antispasmodic, and antihistamine properties,[1] and may have anticholinergic effects at high doses.[2]

Side effects

Adverse effects may include irritability, drowsiness, nightmares, vertigo, nausea or vomiting, visual disturbances or hallucinations, and urticaria. There are potential interactions with other anticholinergics, CNS depressants, and alcohol.[3]

Pharmacology

Unlike many other antitussive drugs such as dextromethorphan, it binds poorly to the sigma-1 receptor.[4]

Synthesis

Clofedanol synthesis: R. Lorenz and H. Henecka, U.S. Patent 3,031,377 (1962).
Clofedanol synthesis: R. Lorenz and H. Henecka, U.S. Patent 3,031,377 (1962).

Society and culture

Chlophedianol was approved for OTC status in 1987 by the FDA OTC monograph process[5] and its safety and efficacy data are limited. It was formerly sold over-the-counter in the United States under the trade name Ulo, as a syrup with a dosage of 25 mg/5 mL; however, it has been withdrawn from the market.[6]

It is marketed in Canada under the trade name Ulone. GM Pharmaceuticals owns the patents to 113 combinations with Chlophedianol and was the first company to launch the cough suppressant in the United States.[7]

It is sold in Japan as an over-the-counter drug under the name Coldrin.[8] It has been marketed in Germany as Pectolitan and in Spain as Gentos.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Martín, Alfonso Velasco (2004). "Tratamiento sintomático de la tos y del resfriado común". Farmacología clínica y terapéutica médica. p. 260. ISBN 9788448604271.
  2. ^ "Clofedanol" (in French). BIAM. 1998-07-24. Retrieved 2007-04-15.
  3. ^ Schlesser JL (1991). Drugs Available Abroad, 1st Edition. Derwent Publications Ltd. p. 29. ISBN 0-8103-7177-4.
  4. ^ Klein M, Musacchio JM (October 10, 1988). "Dextromethorphan binding sites in the guinea pig brain". Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 8 (2): 149–156.
  5. ^ "Department of Health and Human Services. Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Parts 310, 341, and 369. Docket No. 76N-052T. Cold, cough, allergy, bronchodilator, and antiasthmatic drug products for over-the-counter human use; final monograph for OTC antitussive drug products. Federal Register 1987;52(155):30042-57" (PDF). FDA.gov. 1987-08-12.
  6. ^ Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations, March 2020 Edition (Report). Food and Drug Administration. March 20, 2020. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  7. ^ "How Odes Mitchell Built a Pharmaceutical Empire". D Magazine. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  8. ^ "クロフェダノール:コルドリン" [Clofedanol: Coldrin]. Medicine 110 (in Japanese). Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  9. ^ Schlesser JL (1991). Drugs Available Abroad, 1st Edition. Derwent Publications Ltd. p. 29. ISBN 0-8103-7177-4.