1973 Cadillac ambulance

A combination car was a vehicle that could serve either as a hearse or as an ambulance,[1] and had the capability of being swapped between those roles without much difficulty.[2] This hybrid usage of the cars reflects an era when funeral homes offered emergency ambulance service in addition to their primary trade, especially in smaller towns and rural areas.

Combination cars were often built on a Cadillac Commercial Chassis[3] and were customized by coachbuilders such as Superior, Miller-Meteor, Hess & Eisenhardt and Cotner-Bevington.

Design features

1961 Chrysler New Yorker Briarean Combination
This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources in this section. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Combination cars often include:

Decline

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources in this section. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Usage of passenger car or station wagon derived vehicles as ambulances began to decline in the early 1970s and became impractical in the US around 1979. This was due to new federal regulations increasing the required equipment and interior space, as well as a major downsizing of the passenger cars upon which ambulances and funeral cars were previously built.

References

  1. ^ "Hearse Homecoming". www.popularmechanics.com. Archived from the original on 18 July 2006.
  2. ^ "Friends of the Professional Car Society – Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc". www.professionalcarsociety.org. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  3. ^ "The (new) Cadillac Database Professional Cars on Cadillac Chassis 1967–1969". www.car-nection.com. Archived from the original on 27 August 2006.