The first miniature from Manasses' Chronicle: the author (right) next to Tsar Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria and Jesus Christ.
The first miniature from Manasses' Chronicle: the author (right) next to Tsar Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria and Jesus Christ.

Constantine Manasses (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος Μανασσῆς; c. 1130 - c. 1187) was a Byzantine chronicler who flourished in the 12th century during the reign of Manuel I Komnenos (1143-1180). He was the author of a chronicle or historical synopsis of events from the creation of the world to the end of the reign of Nikephoros Botaneiates (1081), sponsored by Irene Komnene, the emperor's sister-in-law. It consists of about 7000 lines in political verse. It obtained great popularity and appeared in a free prose translation; it was also translated into Bulgarian in the 14th century.[1][2]

In 1969 Bulgaria issued two sets of stamps depicting important scenes of the chronicle, to celebrate it.[citation needed]

Manasses also wrote the poetical romance Loves of Aristander and Callithea, also in political verse. It is only known from the fragments preserved in the rose-garden of Macarius Chrysocephalus (14th century). Manasses also wrote a short biography of Oppian, and some descriptive pieces (all except one unpublished) on artistic and other subjects.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Manasses, Constantine". Encyclopædia Britannica. Vol. 17 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 541.
  2. ^ Chronicle edition: Bekker, Bonn 1837; the Bulgarian translation, Cronica lui Constantin Manasses, by Ioan Bogdan and I. Bianu, Bucharest, 1922.

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